Sunday, March 03, 2019

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 3, 2019): Who Doesn't Love Anagrams?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 3, 2019): Who Doesn't Love Anagrams?:
Q: Name a popular restaurant chain in two words. Its letters can be rearranged to spell some things to eat and some things to drink. Both are plural words. What things are these, and what's the chain?
I could say a couple things, but I'd immediately give it away. I'm pretty sure the food or drink items are not on the restaurant chain's menu.

If the couple things were "pizza, pizza", that would definitely give it away.
A: LITTLE CAESARS --> LATTES + ECLAIRS

236 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The first anagram that came up for the restaurant chain is probably what STRAP would like to do.

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    2. STRAP is prosecuting anagrams as a form of organized crime.

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    3. The Internet Anagram Solver comes up with LACERATE SLITS near the top of its list.

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  2. Hey, the food(s) and drink(s) go well together!

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  3. Neither plural food or drink is available at the restaurant chain in question.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Where are the grammar police when we need them?

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    2. Not only are the plural food and drink not available at the restaurant chain, you can't even get a small side salad there.

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  4. No unused clues in the On Air Challenge this week.

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  5. I would be happy to sit down with this food and this drink together.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Replies
    1. WW - There's more to your clue than I originally thought. Nice one.

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  7. You can tear up your lists for this one...

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  8. Suggests a possible self-referential presidential sobriquet.

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  9. Ooh, this is a bit like last week's.

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  10. Some word pairs happen to be just amazingly anagramatically rich. This restaurant chain is another one of those word pairs.

    LegoWhoIsNotAboveGlommingOntoAnagramWhenCreatingPuzzles

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    Replies
    1. Lego, I don't suppose you could help out a fellow Puzzlerian on this one? I got nothing.

      Delete
    2. Two plurals, how many chains have two “s” letters. Hint: not many at all.....

      I feel that WS, adding the plurals clue, made this puzzle so not challenging. It was just an unnecessary piece. But perhaps he is writing for 5th graders.

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    3. Is the word STEAKHOUSE involved?

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    4. Yes, cranberry, STEAKHOUSE is indeed an involved word.

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    5. Oh interesting, my solution wasn't a steakhouse...

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    6. SDB,
      Did you throw sand in the gearbox by being WAY too literal????

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    7. SDB,
      "Steakhouse" is an involved word but it was not involved in this puzzle.

      Delete
    8. Dead Duck,
      I never said it was. It was an inappropriate question to be asked here. I answered it appropriately. Also, I was not "throwing sand in the gearbox" as I do not have any sand, nor is there a gearbox evident. I was not "WAY too literal" either. I was simply being literal, as was my answer of "No" to your post. I believe I was entirely consistent.

      As I understand it, the purpose of this blog is in no way for us to give into cranberry's incessant demands for hints. Our hints are to be enigmatic, yet prove, after the deadline, that we have solved it. I hope this reply is not too involved.

      Delete
  11. Not a rerun but it bares repeating.

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  12. It’s a shame this puzzle did not go live in the middle of March.

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  13. Also anagrams into a phrase that describes the current administration.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't that the truth! Or maybe not.

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    2. Also anagrams into an astronomical redundancy.

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    3. As for the current administration, what do you think are the odds that they end up on the losing end of a RICO statute?

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    4. Jan: I object and don't take a shine to the redundancy part.

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    5. One of Edward G. ROBINSON's greatest MOVIE roles was that of LITTLE CAESAR, who he played in the 1931 breakout movie of the same name.

      Little Caesar was a mobster, so I mentioned CONTRACTS. His character's actual name was RICO, so I mentioned the RICO statutes a few times when people were discussing the President.

      Speaking of RICO, let's hope that Manafort gets about 20 years in about 20 minutes. Cheers!

      Delete
  14. There's a solid alternate answer involving a restaurant chain that is probably better-known in the south. Less solid is the observation that RACKS of lamb can be tastily paired with TUBS of sangria.

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  15. Etymological Hint: Reduplication

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  16. Once again I'm not coming up with an answer. I'm in a real slump lately.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cranberry: It is really not hard. Think.

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    2. I have never gone there and never will.

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    3. I refuse to patronize any chain restaurants, and don't ever do the fast food joints. I like to enjoy what I eat.

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    4. The hardest part is coming up with the food and drink. I keep wanting to use ALES, but I know it's wrong. But then I don't know the restaurant to begin with. It's a vicious cycle.

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    5. Cranberry,
      Don't think that trying to solve it from the back end is the best strategy for this puzzle. Not that many famous restaurant chains with two word names.

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    6. At least tell me if both plural forms end in S.

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    7. They're more likely to end in indigestion.

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    8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    9. CB,
      That would certainly cut down on the number of restaurant names you have to sort through, if that is, in fact, the case.

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    10. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    12. Curtis, I don't think this blog is great for "straight forward answers." Can't speak for Blaine, or everyone, but I think we tend to work better with elliptical hints.

      Delete
  17. Trump and Cohen = Unmatched Porn

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  18. This restaurant chain was in the news recently. Not fake news. --Margaret G.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Doesn't that mean the republicans won't have seen it?

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    2. we are here for the puzzle, not politics. relax

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    3. Not sure who you mean by "we". There is a contingent "here" that has had political discussions for several years. Some are very active, some less so.

      So long as the majority doesn't object (and more importantly our host, who has absolute rulership powers) the political discussions will continue.

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    4. Well spoken, eco. What I noticed about Disappointment's post is how hypocritical it is, since it seems to be all about politics.

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    5. its sad how everything, even a peaceful puzzle is bombarded with politics!

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    6. What is sad about paying attention the what is really important in our lives?

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    7. This whole conversation is a big disappointment.

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    8. My clue was not meant to be political. Simply that Little Caesars issued a warning recently about a fake online coupon. https://www.today.com/food/fake-coupon-goes-viral-offering-3-free-little-caesars-pizzas-t149526 --Margaret G.

      Delete
  19. Kinda place one can patronize wearing one's Weekend Edition Lapel Pin on one's NRA cap.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suspect you could count the number of NRA hats sporting a Weekend Edition Lapel Pin on one finger. I'll let you decide which finger that might be.

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  20. Hey, you need a token Deplorable on the Board.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How did you know Hillary Clinton and I don't attend each other's party's?

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  21. How about a word for things that are eaten and a word that sounds like things that are eaten?

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  22. You know this restaurant could cater either one of them. They'd even handle a STRAP event on the side.

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    Replies
    1. Restaurants don't worry about patrons wearing NRA hats skipping out without paying. They know they are always loaded.

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    2. Trooper once stopped a fellow wearing such a hat. Handed the Trooper his driver's license, registration, and CCP card. Trooper asked if fellow had any guns in the vehicle. Fellow said, "Just the .12 Gauge in rack, 9MM under the seat, .45 in the glove compartment, .25 in my ankle holster, and AR15 in the trunk. Trooper said, "What are you afraid of?" Fellow said, "Not a thing." He musta been loaded.

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  23. I'm unclear on the question: can the chain name be rearranged to both food and drink, or each separately? As in, if the chain were MY DINER, do the letters MYDINER contain both food and drink, or does MYDINER anagram to the food as one word and to the drink as another?

    (Using food and drink as shorthand. No idea is "something to eat" is metaphorical or not.)

    Please and thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If the question were 2 things you might find in a barn, Taco Bell can be rearranged to BALE, COLT.

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    2. I love the people in this comment section.

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    3. Me, too. 

      Check out this avalanche on I-70 in CO this weekend: Snow Motion.

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    4. I live in BRECKENRIDGE. It’s been an unbelievable few days of snow.

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  24. The letters are only anagrammed once to get the answer.

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  25. It took me 2 weeks of unanswered puzzles.But not this week...my,my!

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  26. Mort,

    Dump the Donut and rearrange to get back to your business' current name. They dropped Donut, pretty recently.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Had not heard about that. Will have to look at the store about 2mi. from my house next time I am out.

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  28. PANDA EXPRESS -> SANDPAPER SEX.

    It's very much not the answer, but I still laughed

    ReplyDelete
  29. Did you know that Simon and Garfunkel (whose names don't anagram into anything, as far as I can tell) originally wrote the song "Here's to you, Mrs. Roosevelt..." about the wife of the 32nd President.

    They had to change the lyric to "Here's to you, Mrs. Robinson..." when they got the contract for the movie.

    That explains why "our nation turned its lonely eyes to you." Ooh ooh ooh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I mentioned Simon and Garfunkel only to get to this sentence:

      They had to change the lyric to "Here's to you, Mrs. ROBINSON..." when they got the CONTRACT for the MOVIE.

      One of Edward G. ROBINSON's greatest MOVIE roles was that of LITTLE CAESAR, who he played in the 1931 breakout movie of the same name.

      Little Caesar was a mobster, so I mentioned CONTRACTS. His character's actual name was RICO, so I mentioned the RICO statutes a few times when people were discussing the President.

      Speaking of RICO, let's hope that Manafort gets about 20 years in about 20 minutes. Cheers!

      Delete
    2. 47 months!!!
      WHAT A TRAVESTY OF JUSTICE.

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    3. Doesn't matter, SDB; Trump's likely to pardon him anyway. But any state convictions will stick.

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    4. jan,
      I do know all that, but I still think it does matter because it sends a message to others who would be less likely to receive a pardon. The message is that all you have to do should you get caught is just beg forgiveness. White collar criminals get all the breaks because many of the judges are also crooked. Not in Alabama though, of course.

      Delete
  30. George Costanza could solve this week’s puzzle!

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    Replies
    1. Only if one of the foods were Bosco. And Bosco is neither a drink, nor a food?

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    2. I didn't know they were still making Bosco. A teaspoon of that crap just ruins my single malt scotch.

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    3. You should be using Fox's U-Bet instead. Bosco is for fake blood, as in Psycho.

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    4. Don't ever trust George Costanza with a puzzle clue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyEFiaUQYGE

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  31. Another search-to-anagram-solver puzzle, but superior to last week.
    I was surprised to discover a couple of these "restaurants" sort of nearby. I have no idea how long they have been there.

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  32. how are people getting this so fast! i thought last weeks was easier than this weeks :(

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  33. I'm not getting it so fast! Stop rubbing it in!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just think about the puzzle carefully.

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    2. How much more carefully can I think about it? The three best places I can think of(with two S's)are Logan's Roadhouse, Outback Steakhouse, and Longhorn Steakhouse, and after that I got no anagrams! Any help would be appreciated! Tell me if I'm on the right track! Anyone! I HATE THIS PUZZLE!

      Delete
    3. And consider that SDB's response wasn't "blog administered".

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    4. Which response from SDB? He's got a lot of posts on here.

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    5. I included a link to SDB's response.

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    6. Considering WS only uses incredibly easy answers (I cannot think of a situation where someone in this country has not heard of this restaurant) AND he belabored the point of plural words (some things, some things, plural...) which would give all but the feeblest of minds two off the letters, you should be able to get it in a very short period of time.

      Delete
    7. Yeah, but like Ben noted, it's better to work it out on the elliptical, lest you get BA'd.

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    8. I do have other things on my mind, so that could make things more difficult. I'm seeing my therapist Thursday.

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    9. Hopefully he will be seeing you too.

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    10. I found a 2 word jumble solver.

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    11. i am horrible at reading these cryptic messages. so frustrating!

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  34. Cran, you'd be surprised how close you are.

    MJ, you're pretty lucky, as I recall PV hasn't been invaded by the chains or much of anything. In fact, last time I was there (15+ years ago) I could have sworn there was another cafe or general store besides Hopper's. Or am I living the dream?

    Maybe it was Hopper's - I drove all the way up there to meet potential clients and look at a site. Getting to PV was no problem, some ice and sleet, but we couldn't make it up to the site on Snow Mountain because it was, well, snowing too hard....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did say "sort of" nearby. About 15 miles to each in different directions.
      Snow Mountain? That is a wilderness area, high, cold and isolated. If you had made it to the site, you might still be there.

      Delete
    2. Yeah, 15 miles is about what I saw, but I only looked SW. I suspect SE has one too.

      Actually I don't remember where the site was, especially since we didn't get there, and now I think it was >20 years ago. I just remember some very rural roads to the NE of "downtown" PV, sleet and snow, going up some moderately steep grades, and the clients chickening out. I was willing to go farther - 8 years in upstate NY makes one a fool.

      Besides, we couldn't get stuck as long as the retreat path was downhill. Dead maybe, but not stuck.

      Delete
    3. Just try to out loud say "very rural roads" 8 times fast.

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    4. Even better if you try to say it like Tom Brokaw.

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  35. Bonus Puzzle: A few weeks ago WS had a word reversal puzzle where the answer was "Wishing Well" and "Well-Wishing". In that spirit, each of the words below can be preceded or followed by a word to form either a compound word or a common 2 word phrase.

    For example, if the clue were race ___, ___ race the answer would be race car, car race. Note that unlike this example, the clues endeavor to have words that are not so closely related. The same infill word can occur in multiple answers, and 1 answer is a proper noun.

    1. age ___, ___ age
    2. set ___, ___ set
    3. take ___, ___ take
    4. street ___, ___ street
    5. turn ___, ___ turn
    6. case ___, ___ case
    7. hand ___, ___ hand (2 answers)
    8. ware ___, ___ ware
    9. show ___, ___ show
    10. fair ___, ___ fair
    11. work ___, ___ work
    12. break ___, ___ break
    13. cave ___, ___ cave
    14. snow ___, ___ snow
    15. steward ___, ___ steward
    16. ball ___, ___ ball
    17. run ___, ___ run (2 answers)
    18. standing ___, ___ standing
    19. bid ___, ___ bid

    Please don't post answers until Thursday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bonus Answers: I know you've been waiting

      1. age-old, old age
      2. setup, upset
      3. takeout, outtake (go to and to go is another possibility)
      4. streetside, side street
      5. turnover, overturn
      6. casebook, bookcase
      7. hand over, overhand; or handoff, offhand
      8. warehouse, houseware (why didn't I think of hometown, townhome?)
      9. showboat, boat show
      10. fairway, Wayfair
      11. work over, overwork; also possibly work shift, shift work, though they are a bit closely related.
      12. breakout, outbreak
      13. caveman, man cave
      14. snow white, white snow - slang for meth or cocaine.
      15. stewardship, ship steward
      16. ball game, game ball
      17. run out, out run; or run over, overrun
      18. standing up, upstanding
      19. bid for, forbid

      Delete
  36. Will should win an Oscar for this one.

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  37. Comparing my answer to some of the given clues, I wonder if there "might" be two solutions.

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  38. I reported finding an alternate answer earlier, but it is not a two-word restaurant chain. Sorry about that. For the record, though, McAlister's (a deli chain) anagrams to RICES and MALTS. Save that one for a future puzzle involving beer ingredients.

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  39. wonder how many correct answers this week. Should be a lot. Glad someone from Oakland won last week. Near Berkeley...my area.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Very sad to hear about Alex Trebek and a pancreatic cancer diagnosis. The dreadful disease took my dad but he fought it very hard for 4.5 years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If only he’d paid attention when he read, on July 29, 2013, (category “Kids These Days”):

      “At the age of 15, Jack Andraka won an Intel Award for a noninvasive method of early detection for the pancreatic form of this disease.”

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    2. But, tragically, from what I just read, Jack's test doesn't appear yet to be available. I wonder why?

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    3. Probably didn't work well enough, or bad sensitivity or specificity. He was criticized early for not publishing openly. The little I read reminded me of the Elizabeth Holmes / Theranos story. Check out The Dropout podcast by ABC's Rebecca Jarvis.

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  41. Seems like there should be a better way to diagnose this disease earlier before at stage 4. So sad.

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  42. While the restaurant chain that is the subject of this week's puzzle has never earned even one Michelin Star, I am sure I once heard it referred to as a Black Hole.

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  43. Little Caesars > eclairs & lattes

    My Hint:

    "There definitely is a connection (to last week's Puzzle)." There is a Little Caesars Pizza @ 257 N La Brea Ave #d, Inglewood, CA 90301

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SDB: Wow, that is an over-the-top observation! Have you seen Little Caesars there? (I know you have not eaten there.)

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    2. No, I just googled little caesars la brea, and it came up.

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    3. How astute of you. I thought you did that anyway.

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    4. And should one eat one of their offerings I suspect soon after there will more than one ass toot.

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  44. LITTLE CAESAR’S >>> ECLAIRS, LATTES

    “Check, please.” >>>  “If you´ve got a hankering for something American, pop into the Little Caesar´s in the Tesco at Národní Třída in the Czech Republic.”

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  45. LITTLE CAESARS -> ECLAIRS, LATTES

    > Also anagrams into an astronomical redundancy.

    CELESTIAL, STAR

    > Absence

    An absence seizure, what used to be called petit mal epilepsy, is a Little Seizure.

    > It's as easy as child's play.

    That's a Little Seesaw.

    > Not only are the plural food and drink not available at the restaurant chain, you can't even get a small side salad there.

    No little Caesars there!

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  46. LITTLE CAESARSECLAIRS + LATTES.

    My clue: You can “tear up” your “lists” for this one: “LACERATE LISTS” anagrams to “LITTLE CAESARS.”

    “A bolt of lightning” is un ÉCLAIR en français.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Little Caesar's → eclairs, lattes

    STRAP is prosecuting anagrams as a form of organized crime. The Organized Crime Control Act of 1970 → Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act→ RICO → Edward G. Robinson's character in the 1931 film "Little Caesar", which I've seen more times than I've been to the "restaurant".

    I wrote "I heard that" to Buck Bard's "anagrams into a phrase that describes the current administration". To me it is a homophone, as in "Little Seize Her..." you fill in the rest.

    Jan's redundancy of celestial star anagram (STRAP has so much to do) isn't accurate, there are many celestial objects that aren't stars, and TV and movie stars are anything but heavenly.

    Cran, you'd be surprised how close you are - there's a Little Caesar's in your home town.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. eco: I forget what STRAP stands for.

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    2. Stop The Republican Asinine Politics.

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    3. Their Programs and Policies are more frightening than their politics.

      STRAP: (the) Society To Renounce Anagram Puzzles.

      Reject, Retract, Recant, Repeal, Resist, Rescind, Rebuke, Refute, Repress, Revile, Revoke, Refuse, Repel, Restrain, Repudiate, Renounce, Reform, Repulse, and Rid are occasionally used. But never Resolve.

      Delete
    4. Ego: I recalled that but could not remember all the words.Tks.

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  48. My George Costanza mention was a reference to the famous scene where he pulled a “used” eclair out of the garbage (it still had the doily, it was above the rim!)

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  49. Isn't the White House now the EEK LAIR?

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  50. No lattes, no eclairs? Meh.
    No tables, no chairs, no vegetables? No restaurant.

    ReplyDelete
  51. It seems their commercials only show pepperoni pizzas, no variety...
    It's been a long time since I have eaten at this food chain. It seems their commercials only show pepperoni pizzas, no variety... I always wonder what is in their menu?

    ReplyDelete
  52. I discovered there is a two word jumble solver online. I submitted little caesar (only takes 12 letters and do not need the other s anyway since s is used once in each word). Did not leave space between little caesar. Voilá! I found the two words for food and drink. I thought cereals was one of the answers first. But no WS call for all my effort and cleverness!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just use the INTERNET ANAGRAM SERVER for any number of words...

      Delete
    2. I just now did that and got:

      Wormy Barn Fondues
      Sown Furry Abdomen
      My Fun Snowboarder

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    3. Ron, The two word solver shows the two words together using all the letters. Saves time. Showed Eclairs and Lattes with both s's even though I only used one s in the search.

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    4. How did you manage to spell CAESARS with only one S?

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    5. Natasha, just go to ADVANCED with the Anagram Server and put in 2 for "maximum number of words" and you will obtain only 2 (or fewer: 1) word answers. Easy.

      Delete
  53. Sdb:It did not matter if I left off the last letter..s..I am so clever. I reasoned out that I only wanted words with one s. If I had two s's I would get words I did not want. Wanted words with only one s. Also, sdb..there is no apostrophe in caesars..fyi and for Blaine too

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But there is one in the very upper left corner of their official website. A very tiny one, but one nun the less.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. Someone should tell all these companies that someone is stealing their apostrophes -- Starbucks, Folgers, Barclays, Michaels, Tim Hortons...

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    4. And don't get me started on those that lost the S as well -- Joann Fabrics, Lucky, Nordstrom, J.C.Penney...

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    5. Blaine: I saw one in your post earlier and then it was removed. Is that correct..or was I imagining that? Good point (.) no apostrophes on those company names. Apostrophes must not be cost effective.

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    6. SDB: I do not see an ' on the website in left corner. Can you post it on here?

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    7. Unlike us mere mortals, Blaine can correct his mistakes (like his original Caesar's) and then deny that it ever happened. So much power.

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    8. Was Korvettes, the original post-apostrophicalypse company, the first to use discounts to punctuate their sales?

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    9. Natasha:
      Click on ron's green link above or my black link.

      https://littlecaesars.com/en-us/

      CORRECTION!!!
      I just looked at it again, and my bad, it is not a tiny apostrophe, but probably a copyright mark or whatever. It is so tiny I could not tell.

      Delete
    10. Blaine, you didn't mention all those who lost their S in the stock market.

      Delete
    11. SDB: I did see that mark before. Tks.

      Delete
  54. One unusual thing about Little Caesars around here, is that they are all closed. One person owns them around here and due to the national $5 promotions, LC can't or won't compete, so they closed them all. I don't go there but as of a few weeks ago the one near us was still locked down.

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    Replies
    1. They still have the national ads on TV but the stores are closed up.

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    2. hasn't your governor declared a state of emergency? What is your secretary of state, Anne Chovey doing about it?

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    3. Kris Kobach would've started them back up, if only to supply any visiting sports teams with buffet dinners at the governor's mansion!!

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    4. I still wonder what he is going to do next...

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  55. This comment has been removed by the author.

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