Sunday, February 16, 2020

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 16, 2020): Be Quiet!

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 16, 2020): Be Quiet!:
Q: What familiar 10-letter word contains a silent B, E, and O — not necessarily in that order. And those three letters don't have to be consecutive in the word.
I hope I don't get called this week.
A: SUbPoENAeD

170 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Was it meant as a Valentine's Day puzzle?

    ReplyDelete

  3. The word has been recently used an action without the intended result.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Decent, if not terribly challenging puzzle.

    Happy Sunday, puzzle people.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I, too, know the answer but – ask as nicely as you want – I’m not going to say.

    ReplyDelete
  6. https://i.pinimg.com/originals/66/58/df/6658dfb33b147745d6dc76aeaec32004.jpg

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just got a screen that said visit pinmig.com

      Delete
    2. Odd, I paste it in multiple browsers and I get the jpg.

      Delete
    3. Well, my cell phone is not a smart phone. It's dumbed down.

      Delete
  7. I should have solved it quicker than I did because it applied to me last year.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Some, including me, appear to have passed this week’s test, if I read the above correctly. This puzzle also reminds me of the 7th inning stretch.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Huh. I'd been pronouncing the answer incorrectly. I used to say one of the silent letters. I'm guessing I'm not the only person here who read a word, then discovered it was pronounced a different way. When I was young, I thought infrared was the past tense of infrare. 😁

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I too have always pronounced it incorrectly. I think I have the right answer, but it surprises me because I swear I have heard it pronounced the way I do.

      Delete
    2. Courtney, your comment reminds me of kitchen cabinets. Also - does one pronounce the "th" in "clothes"? I do, as a voiced th. Many don't.

      Delete
    3. Pronunciation is a pseudoscience...

      Delete
  10. The word can be rearranged into a phrase that describes a recent holiday. The last letter and the last 3 letters of this phrase can be instances of the first 4 letters of the phrase.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. February 7 is e Day, which is based upon e=2.718281828. "Subpoenaed" is an anagram of "based upon e". The last 3 letters are "one" like the number 1. We use base 10, but you can have base 1 and base e.

      Delete
    2. Is that anything like A 440 or John Cage's silent opus 4'33"?
      Probably not, huh? Anyway it's a deep bonus. ;)

      Delete
  11. The answer can be rearranged into a two-word phrase that describes one of a group of individuals who were recently [answer]. Another 10-letter phrase (4, 6) describing some of these individuals is not the intended answer but also includes a silent, B, E, and O.

    The answer can also be rearranged into a single, hyphenated word that describes the seed of the coffee plant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    2. @ron, I was think “dumb people,” but close enough for government work!

      Delete
    3. this gave me the answer... i think your clue is a little too obvious with your bracketed [answer] ...

      Delete
    4. This thread didn't help me until Blaine removed the "serve" clue which I miraculously was able to recall.

      Delete
  12. 'Tis a fine fun puzzle by a fellow (or female... not sure) Minnesotan. But in my answer, which seems to be the consensus here, I might argue that a letter other than the "E" is silent. No problem, of course, with the O and B.
    Another minor quibble... the puzzle reads:
    What familiar 10-letter word contains a silent B, E, and O – not necessarily in that order. And those three letters don’t have to be consecutive in the word.
    I cannot for the life of me think of any word of any length in which a silent B,E, and O, in any order, are consecutive!

    Leobego(The"eob"AtTheBeginningIsSilent)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Lego-
      I thought Will was going to use you in the on air “LL” puzzle (Lego L____)! Oh well.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Snipper. That did not cross my mind while listening to the on-air contestant (who, incidentally, did quite well on Will's LL quiz). Such a scenario would have been fun... and embarrassing for all involved, perhaps unfolding something like this...
      LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO: And the winner this week is Dick Ehrman of Lincoln, Nebraska. Congratulations, Dick.
      DICK EHRMAN: Thanks Lu Lu.
      GARCIA-NAVARRO: Dick, are you ready to play The Puzzle?
      EHRMAN: Well, I guess there's one way to find out.
      WILL SHORTZ: All right, Dick. I'm going to give you some words starting with the letter L. For each one, give me another word starting with L that will complete a common two-word phrase. For example, if I said language, you might say lab, as in language lab.
      EHRMAN: OK.
      SHORTZ: Your first one is a two-letter answer: Lu.
      EHRMAN: Oh, easy! Lu Lu, as in our congenial host!
      SHORTZ: Lu Lu is it. Good. Now six-letter answers. And your first one is Lego.
      EHRMAN: Hmm, Lego... Lego Land?
      SHORTZ: No, we're looking for a six-letter word.
      EHRMAN: Lego Logoff?
      SHORTZ: Great guess. I hear many people do that. But not what we're looking for.
      EHRMAN: Lego La-Z-Boy?
      SHORTZ: Again, good guess. I hear he's quite a slouch.
      EHRMAN: I'm drawing a blank. Lulu, help me out.
      GARCIA-NAVARRO: Sorry, Dick. I haven't a clue!
      EHRMAN: Will? How about a hint?
      SHORTZ: We're running short on time. I'll give it to you. Lego Lambda.
      EHRMAN and GARCIA-NAVARRO: Who the heck is that!


      LegoLoggingOff

      Delete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  14. If one says it with a strong Canadian accent, OUTCLIMBED could be construed as an alternate answer.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Replies
    1. The bean soup Ed prepared had 239 beans in it because Ed had heard the joke.

      Delete
  16. Some people will just ignore this puzzle.

    ReplyDelete
  17. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have absolutely no bdelloidea.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Bonus Puzzles to WranglE with, I've been feeling gUilty about not posting any.

    You'rE saying damN, I thouGHt he was goNe!

    1) Name a familiar 6 letter word with a silent G, H, and K.
    2) Name a familiar 7 (or 9 or 10) letter word with a silent E, G, and H.
    3) Name a familiar 7 letter word with a silent E, T, and W.
    4) Name a familiar 8 letter word with a silent G, H, and U.
    5) Name a familiar 13 letter word with a silent C, E, and P.
    6) Name a (not quite so) familiar (but you know it) 10 letter word with a silent A, E, R, and T.
    7) Name a familiar 12 letter word with a silent D, E, K, and W.

    Silent letters are not necessarily in the order given.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course the E in gone is silent, too lazy to fix.

      Delete
    2. At least you've acknowledged your error...

      Delete
    3. Fine Bonus puzzles, eco. I've solved a few. Quite sure my answer to Number 1 is not errant. Number 3 was a struggle but solvable. Still working on the others.
      While researching Number 3, I stumbled upon a good word with an E, T and W, with all three not silent: "ecotown!"

      LegoWhoObservesThatMost"PronunciationPuzzles"TendToResideNotInEcotownsButInInefficientGrayAreas

      Delete
  20. Feisty hound treat. At least I would end up doing it. It'd be neat if I could get Marvin.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Not sure if there would be any advantage in sending in my answer in lower or upper case.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I thought my answer deserved to be ignored at first.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Some woodwinds have a single reed, some have a double reed. A NOREEDOBOE would be silent, woodn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Then what would the orchestra tune to?

      Delete
    2. No problem. 4'33" is on the program.

      Delete
    3. https://youtu.be/JTEFKFiXSx4

      Delete
    4. A NOREEDOBOE would not be silent if you used it to hit the TYMPANI.

      Also, of interest ONLY to the assembled members of Blainesville, if you used an OBOE to hit the TYMPANI you would be using up all vowels with just two instruments.

      Delete
    5. Ben, We might want to hit our tympani with an oboe in one hand and a tuba in the other.

      LegoWhoSuggestsThatWithThoseThreeInstrumentsWeOughtToBeAbleToMaintainA"BuoyantBioTempo!"

      Delete
    6. Actually, in music with all the flats and sharps you have a few extra letters like A-flat and E-flat. There is also A-sharp and even A-sharp, which is the leading tone to F-sharp.

      Delete
    7. Sorry, that's E-sharp which is the leading tone to F-sharp. A-sharp is the mediant.

      Delete
    8. To see an illustration of a guy pounding TYPANI with an OBOE and TUBA (mentioned in my Tue Feb 18, 08:37:00 AM PST comment), open this link and scroll down just slightly.

      LegoLikesIllustria!

      Delete
    9. What would the Orchestra tune to? Likely A=440?

      Delete
    10. Yes, but not if the oboe is silent!

      Delete
  24. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  25. When I played clarinet in the orchestra, I had to have two clarinets. An A and a B flat clarinet. Had to alternate depending on the key of the piece. I remember the tune up with the oboe.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Does antimatter really matter? Does your auntie matter?

    ReplyDelete
  27. Did Mayor Pete forget to shave today? Even Nixon knew he needed to shave twice a day.

    ReplyDelete
  28. The one I really can't puzzle out: Who's gonna be Bernie's Veep?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just pray it won't be Amy Clubcar. If I have to keep seeing that Cheshire Cat disingenuous, painted on smile, I think I will defect. I wouldn't trust her to organize a picnic at an assisted living facility.

      Delete
  29. I thought Bloommorgue looked like he was being stopped and frisked last night during the debate.

    ReplyDelete
  30. SDB: Strange he did not shave. Now I am not voting for him.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sure he shaved in the morning, but with his very heavy beard he should have shaved again later.

      Delete
    2. SDB: He should have learned from Nixon...but too young I guess to know about that.

      Delete
  31. I wanted to vote for Marianne Williamson in the primary. HerHillaryness and Fauxcahontas think they're hippie dippies of the 60's, but Marianne is the genuine article. There could be Bernie's Veep.

    ReplyDelete
  32. SUBPOENAED

    My Hint:
    "I should have solved it quicker than I did because it applied to me last year." I was subpoenaed as a witness last year.

    ReplyDelete
  33. SUBPOENAED (sə-pē′nəd) silent B O E.

    My hint: I doubt you'll be "called” = “subpoenaed”

    Eco's Bonus puzzles:

    1. KNIGHT (silent G,H,K)
    2. WEIGHED, REWEIGHED, OUTWEIGHED (silent E,G,H)
    3. WRESTLE (silent E,T,W)
    4. BOROUGHS, DAUGHTER, ALTHOUGH (silent G,H,U)
    5. PSEUDOSCIENCE (silent C,E,P)
    6. The only American English words with a silent R are SARSAPARILLA and MRS. (missus) (except if you're from the Northeast: “park the car in Harvard yard”)
    7. ACKNOWLEDGED (silent D,E,K,W)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My answers were different for #2 and #4, and I had knowledgable (alt. spelling, knowledgeable would work in 13 letters, with 2 silent E's) for #7.

      #6 is forecastle, and dictionary.com, wikipedia, and Merriam-Webster all show the R as not pronounced. Now you have to find one of your weird dictionaries that says otherwise.

      Delete
    2. Some would say that "February" has a silent R.

      Delete
    3. The former morning host at my very local public radio station made a point of saying Feb-ROO-ary. Locals in Charm City pronounce it Bawl-mer, Amtrak conductors say "Next station, Bal-TEE-more."

      Delete

  34. SUBPOENAED

    "Decent, if not terribly challenging puzzle.

    Happy Sunday, puzzle people."

    As in puzzle people, not puzzle(d) people.

    ReplyDelete
  35. SUBPOENAED. No hint from me. Been busy.

    ReplyDelete
  36. SDB: wrote we could compare note. (I was subpoenaed a few weeks ago for jrsy duty.)

    ReplyDelete
  37. SUBPOENAED Ergo the, “called,” and, “Who am
    I to Judge?” commments.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Replies
    1. Thanks, SuperZee. It is quite a big deal for Smith to host her.

      Delete
    2. Good for Smith, Word Woman. I hope they don't have to organize a PENNY SOCIAL to pay NANCY PELOSI! (Do commencement speakers get paid? I wonder... not ever having been one.)
      Did you have a memorable commencement speaker, Word Woman?
      Mine was not so memorable except for his closing words of advice (which everyone remembered!), not in his commencement address but in our student newspaper interview previewing his address:
      Student Newspaper:
      Do you have anything else to say to our university community?
      Doctor James:
      The next time you wipe your ass, look at it.

      Commencement speakers at my school that I would have enjoyed hearing were Russell Baker and William F. Buckley Jr.

      LegoWhoRequiresSomeKindOfMirrorBeforeHeCanFollowDoctorJames'Advice

      Delete
    3. Hey Lego, commencement speakers are not paid but often stay in a beautiful, accomodating Smith College home. She will also receive an honorary degree. It will be live-streamed on May 17.

      Students at Rally Day were quite excited today when she was announced and erupted in chants of "Nancy! Nancy! Nancy!"

      Our speaker did not win the affection of our parents, especially, when she told us we could have gotten as good an education at a community college as at Smith.

      There have been worse speakers, but that one was up there in the fray. Your speaker sounds like he may be added to that mix of crappy (pun intended) commencement speakers.

      Delete
  39. Ok,ok. Here's my hint, to whom it may concern and everybody else:
    "Feisty hound treat" anagrams to:
    Testify under oath
    The reference to Marvin was to Marvin Gaye's "Can I Get a Witness." Both related to "subpoenaed."

    ReplyDelete
  40. Subpoenaed

    Was it meant as a Valentine's Day puzzle? Can't go a court-in' without a date.

    Bonus Answers
    1) Knight has a silent k, g, and h.
    2) Weighed has a silent e, g, and h. As do Lightable and Tightrope.
    3) Wrestle has a silent w, t, and e.
    4) Doughnut has a silent u, g, and h.
    5) Pseudoscience has a silent p, c, and e.
    6) Forecastle has a silent r, e, a, and t.
    7) Knowledgable has a silent k, w, d, and e.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Click on the AMERICAN pronunciation of FORECASTLE.

      Delete
    2. So you're saying Merriam-Webster (WS's official use dictionary) is British? They don't distinguish, but allow both pronunciations. And in their discussion of silent letters they use forecastle as an example of the silent R.

      Delete
    3. I stand by my statement that there are only 2 words in AMERICAN English with a silent R (See above) and my dictionary entry confirms this.

      Delete
    4. I had complete faith that you could find some kooky source for your argument, and once again your juvenile Free Dictionary has come through. At some point you'll realize it isn't worth the price.

      Wikipedia compares "modern and notable English dictionaries"; using that as a starting point (main dialect American only):

      1) American Heritage Dictionary: (fōk'səl, fôr'kăs′əl) also fo'c's'le fōk'səl) Their audio only gives the first pronunciation - in a very American accent, they do acknowledge the alternate pronunciations by those in ignorance. They, like many others, note that the spelling is sometimes changed to assist the ignorants.
      2) The Merriam-Webster Dictionary: The Puzzlemaster's favorite, as I noted before it also lists ˈfōk-səl, with ˈfȯr-ˌka-səl as an alternate, as well as fo'c'sle as an alternate spelling (see a pattern yet?)
      3) New Oxford American Dictionary: I have a print copy, it shows a silent R.
      4) Random House Webster's: Dictionary.com bases its content on this, and it gives 4 pronunciations: fohk-suh l, fawr-kas-uh l, -kah-suh l, fohr-, some pronounce the R.
      5) Webster's Third New International Dictionary: My massive copy lists the pronounced R as "sometimes."

      Other sources including Wiktionary, Wikipedia, Collins Dictionary, and Macmillan Dictionary are less generous to your point of view, only listing the silent R version.

      Finally, The American Heritage Book of English Usage: A Practical and Authoritative Guide to Contemporary English notes "that it is also acceptable to pronounce" with the R sound, but the silent R is the first given, as well as the alternate spelling (I'm sure you've seen the pattern by now!)

      So, you rely on one on-line dictionary launched in 2003 (barely old enough to drive) in opposition to 5 highly regarded dictionaries, Wiki, two additional dictionaries and a usage handbook.

      As Merriam=Webster notes, "R exists in forecastle only to mock landlubbers." Time to put on your bustier (with a silent R) and take a sail down the Salt River.

      Class, and your argument, dismissed.

      Delete
    5. Blaine, did you delete my response? I can remove the snark if you wish, but stand by the listings of 5 respected dictionaries and various other sources.

      Delete
    6. I read it before Blaine tossed it into dumpster 732 where it belongs.

      Delete
    7. I think it is as likely that the post never made it to the page.
      It didn't seem RBA fodder to me.

      Delete
    8. For some reason it ended up in the "moderation" folder as potential SPAM, maybe for the number of links. In any case, I just released it.

      Delete
    9. In the case of "bustier" we have chosen to use the British pronunciation. There is no special American pronunciation, but in the case of "forecastle" there is a British pronunciation, but also an AMERICAN pronunciation. You may, of course, use whichever one you wish to use.

      My online dictionary reveals both American and English pronunciations.

      There are many online dictionaries. Try the One Look Dictionary service...

      I still stand by my comments that certain words have an AMERICAN English pronunciation, but we do have many words of British origin where we keep the British pronunciation; "forecastle" is one of these words with a British & a different AMERICAN pronunciation...

      Delete
    10. No, there are 2 pronunciations, and both are found in American English. Tomato, tomato, etc. The AMERICAN HERITAGE Dictionary uses the fo'c'sle pronunciation first, as does Merriam-Webster (Noah Webster was born in Connecticut). And Wikipedia and Wiktionary ONLY give that pronunciation. So while both may be legitimate, you can't say that one is only British and not American.

      I believe bustier is the French pronunciation, much like metier and croupier. If you went to Vegas and pronounced it croo-peer they'd give you a lot of crap.

      Delete
    11. Let's call the whole thing auf.

      Delete
    12. Everything on the internet, especially Youtube, must be true. Your link has 34 subscribers, a sure sign of authority.

      Delete
    13. When you don't like the message, be sure to attack the messenger, it's called an ad hominem attack.

      Delete
    14. It's actually called looking for evidence and evaluating it. Nice try, but the best you can do to refute Merriam-Webster and a host of internationally recognized historic and reliable sources is to come up with 1 free online source and an obscure youtube video.

      You choose to believe those very few sources to substantiate your strident and preconceived ideas in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. Follow your gut:
      - The Red Scare
      - Domino Theory
      - Nicaraguan invaders
      - Yellowcake and WMD

      What could possibly go wrong?

      Delete
  41. SUBPOENAED

    Eco's bonuses:
    1. KNIGHT
    2. HEIGHTS (HEIGHTENS, HEIGHTENED)
    3. WRESTLE
    4. BOROUGHS, THOROUGH
    5. PSEUDOSCIENCE
    6. could not find one
    7. ACKNOWLEDGED

    ReplyDelete
  42. Was Beowulf awarded an OBE for killing Grendel?

    ReplyDelete
  43. SUBPOENAED

    For my initial post on this thread I almost wrote—instead of “I hear you, Blaine”—“I’m hearing you, Blaine,” but thought that I might receive the dreaded “This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.”

    ReplyDelete
  44. "The answer can be rearranged into a two-word phrase that describes one of a group of individuals who were recently [answer]." Some of the impeachment witnesses subpoenaed by the house might be described as ABUSED PEONs.

    "The answer can also be rearranged into a single, hyphenated word that describes the seed of the coffee plant." Despite what we call it, it's a seed -- a PSEUDO-BEAN.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A bunch of talented pop musicians walked into a studio one day. A BOP ENSUED.

      Delete
  45. My clues:

    Some, in(“summon“)cluding me, “appear” to have passed this week’s test, if I (“test-if-y”) read the above correctly.

    This puzzle also reminds me of the 7th inning stretch - Buy me “some peanuts” and Cracker Jack.

    Ok - perhaps more than a stretch with that one.

    ReplyDelete
  46. a small child's ears never register any of the letters in OBEY, so they're all silent.

    ReplyDelete
  47. a small child's ears never register the letters in OBEY -- so they must all be silent.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Except the y, which can be taken as "why," the eternal question which has been mankind's question since time immemorial.
      Thank you, Professor Irwin Corey.

      Delete
  48. SUBPOENAED
    Apparently my use of the verb "serve" was too much of a giveaway, according to Blaine. Got ABUSED PEON, BTW. What was the anagram about the recent holiday?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That was Bobby's post from Sunday. He explains it in his reply. It's an interesting clue. I never would have come up with it.

      Delete
  49. subpoenaed

    Last Sunday I said, “I, too, know the answer but – ask as nicely as you want – I’m not going to say.” I’d have to be subpoenaed.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Word Museum opening in DC on May 31, 2020. WORD!

    ReplyDelete
  51. Thanks for that heads-up, Word Woman. This is the best reason I can think of (at this point in time, anyway) of taking a road trip to our nation's capital!
    Here is my heads-up to all Blainesvillians:
    Our friend Chuck, a regular poster on Blaine's blog, has contributed another of his fun-to-solve puzzles to Joseph Young's Puzzleria!, fresh of the cyberpresses, uploaded early this morning. (See the link on Blaine's PUZZLE LINKS.)
    Chuck is a very creative puzzle-maker. His latest conundrum involves a pair of #1 Billboard hits with an interesting connection.
    Stop on by and visit us!

    LegoWhoThinksThatIfParisWouldOpenAWordMuseumItOughtToBeCalled"TheLivre"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maizie and I are on it! Word Museum, here we come!

      <<< Current mood during N.P.D. and SATurday prep for SAT prep class.

      Delete
  52. I don't understand why people are so mean to minorities. After all there aren't that many billionaires anyway.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the rich are a minority. But, every time you drink Coca Cola, go to the movies, buy a computer, order from Amazon, fill your car with fuel, you are helping to support the rich because they own everything we depend on.

      Delete
    2. Thisis why i switched to Dr. Pepper. I also try and use Wall Mart for online orders.

      Delete
  53. RIP Sy Sperling, who was always at the toupee of his game.

    And Larry Tessler, who has enabled life as we know it (appropriate to cut and paste).

    ReplyDelete
  54. This week's WESUN rundown first appeared without the puzzle segment. The new puzzle segment is up now, but the posted puzzle for next week is the HEARTBEAT -> BREATHE, EAT one from a few weeks ago.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I predict 10,000 correct answers this week.

      Delete
    2. I have a feeling we'll hear a different puzzle when the show actually airs.

      Delete
    3. The on-air player is Chris Towles of Pfafftown, N.C. How many silent Fs in "Pfafftown"?

      Delete
    4. Wikipedia says "Poff-town", but they cite a site that plays an audio clip that sounds like "Poff-ton", so you may be right, except that site claims it's being spoken by a male from the United Kingdom, so maybe we should leave this to ron and ecoarchitect to fight out?

      Delete
    5. I am not a big fan of the silent W.

      Delete
    6. Are you afraid of becoming Ord Oman?

      Delete
    7. Ord Oman, Pfafftown may be the home of the Silent Majority.

      Delete
    8. Ord, short for Ordovician, works for a geologist. "O man" is hard to reconcile for this Word Woman, though.

      Pfui, geofan (good one)!

      Delete
    9. jan. I sure HOPE they change the puzzle before air time. Wouldn't it be SOOOO sad for your post above to be UNNECESSARILY DELETED by a blog administrator? ;-)

      Delete
    10. Isn't the Ordovician when many fossils were created that became major petroleum and gas reservoirs, like the 5.5 billion barrels under Oman?

      Delete
  55. Why do NPR and most media use "coronavirus" rather than its official name COVID-19? "Coronavirus" is entirely general, COVID-19 is specific.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Could be worse. COVID-19 apparently refers to the disease outbreak. They could choose to refer to the virus that causes it, SARS-CoV-2. Try pronouncing that!

      Delete
  56. Over 600 correct answers this week.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Next week's puzzle: Name a well-known game in 8 letters. Drop the 5th letter, move the 1st letter into the vacated spot, and you'll name, in order, a part of the human body. What game is it?

    ReplyDelete
  58. Name a well known game in 8 letters, remove the 5th letter. Move the 1st letter into the space just vacated by that 5th letter, and you'll name in order a part of the human body.

    ReplyDelete
  59. The current NPR puzzle page doesn't have a Submit Your Answer link, but here's one you can use.

    ReplyDelete
  60. In the on-site play, they skipped over the one item that still had me stumped.


    9. [6,5] SA- TO-

    Could that first word be SALTED?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used an online crossword dictionary to find it. I'd once seen a film about the preparation of the dessert, but didn't remember the name.

      Delete
    2. In my post above, that should've been on-air play. Stupid auto-correct!

      Delete
  61. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  62. A great game, especially if winter weather has left you bored.

    ReplyDelete
  63. Thanks, Jan - I used the link and submitted.

    ReplyDelete
  64. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  65. I just updated the Wikipedia page for the game.

    ReplyDelete