Sunday, February 23, 2020

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 23, 2020): Word Operation

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 23, 2020): Word Operation:
Q: Name a well-known game in 8 letters. Drop the 5th letter, move the 1st letter into the vacated spot, and you'll name, in order, a part of the human body. What game is it?
So to verify, 8 for the first part and 7 for the second.

Edit: You spend a lot of time counting cards that add to 15.
A: CRIBBAGE --> RIB CAGE

216 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. P.S. The NPR website currently shows the incorrect puzzle.

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    2. So, potentially, one could win twice this week!?

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    3. I see that the NPR website has been updated!

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    4. It has now been updated with the correct puzzle.

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    5. But last I checked, it's still missing a "submit answer" link! While that's still missing, you can use THIS ONE!

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    6. Pro tip: if you don't see the link, just go to any of the prior weeks – it's always the same

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  2. That took about 15 seconds to solve.

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  3. I was able to solve it with time to spare so I can move onto other things today.

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  4. Take the even numbered letters of the game. Rearrange. You get a mammal.

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  6. Did you use a pen to solve this puzzle?

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  7. Even I got this one. Just a little hint: It's mentioned in an episode of The Monkees. Name the episode, the air date, and which Monkee made a reference to it. Hey, Hey...

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    1. If that's a guess, you're right. If not, then my God! Have I met my match!

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    2. Not a guess. The game is popular in my family and that episode, especially the way that word is pronounced, has always stuck with me.

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    3. Faithful Monkee watcher here but I don't remember this episode. I do remember the woodie station wagon. Anyone else here have one in their family?

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    4. Does a 1987 Dodge Caravan, with Woodie trim count?
      https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/87-90_Dodge_Grand_Caravan.jpg

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    5. Neat observation, but naming episode and date would lead even more directly to the answer than this clue already does, IMHO.

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    6. Yes, but since there are 50+ plus episodes, roughly 26 minutes apiece that's...well that's...That's a lot of tv viewing.

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  8. Replies
    1. So with the Corona thing should I cancel my trip to Tuscany? What is the name of the French game where you build out a bunch of cities?

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    2. Plantsmith, are you thinking of Carcassonne?

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  9. So, what part of the body is the ONOMOLY?

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    1. It's connected to the CRASBLE.

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    2. I had the same question about the OMIDOES.

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    3. How about ORNCOLE, KEESALL or INGROSS?

      Or perhaps HEAPANT, EINREER, NTEAOPE or ILDWOAR?

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    4. I reverse engineered this puzzle, thinking of (without internet or other lists) body parts first.

      In honor of our crazy emperor with no clothes, Learrobe would be a good game.

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    5. I once had to go in for CEDAUCE surgery. While I was there, they also checked my UGOTWAR. Unfortunately, later that day I fell and sprained my OFTSALL. Talk about pain! To this day it still hurts when I try to play MSTOBACH!

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    6. My favorite games to play are EHUMBRUS, EPATOLLA, and TURESHRA. But those last two can be murder on the old ACCBRAT. Right now, my INENINS are killing me just thinking about it!

      Delete
  10. Two of the body part’s functions are specifically mentioned in an oath the U.S. Constitution requires.

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  12. I never could decide what category this game fell into.

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  14. I'm surprised how easy this was.

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  15. Any silent letter(s) in this one?

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    Replies
    1. Like last week, some forecastle agree and some will not.

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    2. Merriam-Webster.com has ˈkri-bij.
      Dictionary.com has krib-ij.
      So, while it seems to me there is a silent B in this week's game, it's unclear which one it is.
      I will not agree to have a battle over it, however.
      And I found skydiveboy's reply both clever and amusing.

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  16. NPR is Joking with me...I can't find the submission thigamajig on their website. Is this a cagey way that they have of keeping me from sending in the answer?

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    1. Just scroll down to the end of the page and you'll see a heading that says Connect. Click it and then you'll see the link to the Sunday Puzzle answer submission.

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    2. Actually, the heading says Connect, then there is a list that includes Contact. That is what you click.

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    3. Thanks Wordsmythe, but it was one hell of a damned long page. I hadn't gone far enough. Time to change my name from C A P to technological dinosaur. Nah, I'll stay with C A P. Sometimes I'm reminded that this isn't a garden of Eden and even after you get the answer, it still takes work.

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    4. All right! Now your next assignment: go to YouTube and binge watch all the Monkees episodes that are available. In one of them, I am certain that Mickey Dolenz says the name of this game. It'll be a spoken in a fast rat-a-tat dialogue, so you might have to watch the episodes again to make sure you heard it right. Now isn't that a great way to have fun and check your answer at the same time? Lol😁

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    5. Mickey is the Mouse, Micky is the Monkee.

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    6. Oh yeah? Which one married the Japanese wife?

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  17. Many a body part (and life) has been lost to this game.

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  18. I think the onomolies are part of the 12th chromosome chain. Discovered at Stanford in 1992 by Dr. Mindcraft.

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    Replies
    1. Though I have not played this game it may have something to do with throwing darts?

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  19. What does one take for an ortfite infection?

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  20. I was hoping that it would be something with a fun name like Skittles.

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  22. Warning: Shamefully shameless Puzzleria! plug ahead:
    Yes, this week's NPR puzzle is not so tough, but is clever and fun to solve. In my experience, bad tough puzzles are easier to construct than good easy puzzles. Peter Collins, the author of this puzzle, consistently constructs puzzles worth solving.
    That said, if you hanker for a few tougher puzzles (puzzles that range in quality from "just north of not so bad" to "just south of sort of good"), you know exactly where to go... to Puzzleria! (see Blaine's PUZZLE LINKS)
    On our current menu we offer:
    1. An uncharacteristically excellent Billboard #1 Hit puzzle! (It was created by our friend Chuck, a Blainesvillian.)
    2. A brownstone mystery to brainstorm,
    3. Mannequinslaughter at the Haberdashery!
    4. Fistfuls of silver and green,
    5. The silence of the monograms (six "riff-offs" of last week's NPR "subpoenaed" puzzle).
    Finally, a note to Curtis: Check out the Dessert Menu on this recent Puzzleria!

    LegoWhoWishesHeWereJustWestOfNod

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  23. I solved it! I noticed Will Shortz skipped dessert #9, on air. What is (6 5) SA TO? I can't get it🍰

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    1. BirdQueen,
      Welcome to this blog.
      Have a dessert!

      LegoDessertLover

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    2. I was waiting for BA FO, but it never came.

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    3. Don't think I've ever had it. Flambé seems a waste of good ethanol.

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    4. Never had this one. And the last name is also the name of a famous actor? I heard it is good though. Still working on the other puzzle.

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    5. Surprised also there was no CR BR; 5, 6.

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    6. I always thought that BA FO would be a perfect name for one of Dick Tracey’s villains.

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    7. And CR BR would be a great name for a stripper...or a torch singer.

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    8. Just say N.O. to Ba----- Fo----.

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    9. SuperZee, agreed. And flipping the order of the words could mean to care for certain fruit on a temporary basis.

      eco, My first encounter was not there, but at a geologic conference in Casa Grande, Arizona. We presented our GIS product and were treated to BA FO that evening.

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    10. BA FO writ large: that scene from "Apocalypse Now" with napalm in the jungle, "Ride of the Valkyrie" on the soundtrack.

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    11. Now I can't get the image/sound of BA FO WR LA out of my head.

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    12. Try this: keep the Wagner, visualize Elmer Fudd chasing Bugs Bunny, singing "Kill the Wabbit!" Carrots Foster?

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    13. Don't visualize, just WATCH IT. An epic episode, along with this cutting 6 minutes.

      Chuck Jones deserved the Medal of Freedom.

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  24. You can rearrange the body part into a food and a container that food frequently comes in.

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    1. Well done, Bobby. 'Tis a food that can be kind of sticky.

      LegoFishStickLover

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    2. There's a grain of truth in that.

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  25. Replies
    1. Is this a test of our honesty?

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    2. Super hint, Clark. I have never cheated on a test, but I have slept through a few (test patterns on a B&W TV screen, that is).

      LegoWhoCommendsClarkForFightingForTruthJusticeTheAmericanWay...AndForHonesty

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  27. Many 8 letter words (_A_) produce 7 letter words (B) by the operation of today's puzzle. Solve these:
    1. Many old _A_ require new _B_ to complete their renovations.
    2. Readers here are _A_ about what those _B_ are contributing.
    3. The council meeting ended in a _A_ match re the need for more low cost _B_.
    4. A huge horse _A_ by followed by the other fox _B_.
    5. Be careful not to _A_ paint on that drying _B_.
    6. Many _A_ (capitalized?) are careful _B_ of news about immigration law.
    7. Many potheads hide their _B_ in their _A_.
    8. As prom night passed some got _A_ while others got _B_.
    9. The iron bridge _A_ was _B_.
    10. Some _A_ places require _B_ in their construction.

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  28. We were talking about dropping the W in words: Alt Hitman self-published the first edition of Leaves of Grass.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I always enjoyed atching the Ide, Ide, Orld of Sports.

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    2. Yes, Super Zee. The thrill of victory may be exhilarating. But beware the agony of defeat... it is like the Ides Ides Month of March was for Caesar!
      Word Woman,
      I hear that Alt was quite the out-of-ctrl criminal! He would break and enter many a home, insert himself into people's private space, barbarously scheming to delete property, functioning more-or-less as a leech, never taking a pause from his larceny! Will the cops in blue caps lock up this scoundrel ever?!
      Just as well if they don't, I guess. For if they do he'll likely just esc. I hear he is shifty! Shall his reign of plunderous terror never end!?

      LegoWhoUrgesAllWhoHaveAPrinterToPgUpPgDnAndPrtSc

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    3. Many fell prey to Erner Erhard's Icked Itch of the Est.

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    4. No Ws would be a problem for beginning journalists. They'd have to ask ho, hat, here, hen, hy, and ho(two ho's?).

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    5. Reminds me of the film "The Olf of All Street". Or the TV show "The Est Ing". Or the book where that guy goes in search of the hite hale. Or the famous author, Illiam Adsorth Longfello. I wonder: If the PuzzleMaster himself were sick of Ws, would that make him Ill Shortz? E should all be orried right about no!

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    6. Lego-As one addicted to fitness walking, I certainly know, “The Agony of de Feet.”

      Delete
  29. Theatrical Clues: Lisa Bonet and Nathan Lane.

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  31. Ok, to whom it may concern and everybody else, here is my clue:
    The name of the game almost perfectly rhymes with the last
    name of a famous composer, when pronounced in an Anglicised manner. This composer is not as well-known as say, Bohuslav Martinu, but still ranks among the best.

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    Replies
    1. I'm being modest. Modesty is my best quality. 😎

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    2. I find that interesting because modesty has always been one of my many virtues.

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    3. It looks to me like you are referring to the wrong game and the wrong composer.

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    4. A different composer. But the right game.

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    5. Happy Birthday to my composer.

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    6. My composer is Frank Bridge, whose birthday was yesterday, not Modest Mussorgsky, which somewhat rhymes with Parcheesi.

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  32. I was running through a number of the old "prisoner" puzzles on Car Talk - hats, marbles, light switches - when it occurred to me how lucky we are that our justice system does not rely on an out-of-control, capricious, sadistic person like the Warden in those puzzles.

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  33. I think I have to cheat on this one this week. I've been racking my brain, but with nursery preparations for our twins that might arrive any time within the next month, I can't take any more time to just sit and think. Google, here I come.

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    1. This is from Deb Amlen's advice on How to Solve The New York Times Crossword, but it applies to other puzzles as well. I've seen Will Shortz express similar sentiments:

      It’s Not Cheating, It’s Learning

      Tip: Don’t be afraid to look up answers. You’ll become a better solver for it.

      Let me say something that may be controversial, but it needs to be said: It’s O.K. to look something up when solving a crossword.

      Crosswords are ultimately learning tools, whether you’re learning some trivia or an interesting new word or phrase. When you look something up, you’re learning so you’ll know it for next time.

      Of course, some solvers may tell you that looking up the answer to a clue is “cheating,” but to us, that way lies frustration and a path to giving up. And that’s no fun. Crosswords are a game, and games are supposed to be fun.

      Still not sure looking things up is fair? Here is outright permission:

      “It’s your puzzle. Solve it any way you like.” — Will Weng, the second crosswords editor of The New York Times (1969 - 1977)

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  34. Mr.Eding, If you focus on the word "cheat" and think of synonyms, it may help you.

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  35. I’m thinking Mr Edina’s post is intended as a clue. Unless he’s just kidding with us.

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    Replies
    1. Ah, yes. Caught me napping.

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    2. I am certainly not kidding about the twins! We're hoping they wait to make their debut for at least another 3 weeks. We plan to stoke their joy for games and puzzles alike, just like their parents.

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    3. Congratulations[!?] on the incoming, or are they outgoing?

      Replacing the 5th letter of the game with the 2nd letter of the game might describe your future experiences.

      Delete
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  37. Jan, still amazed at that "flat earther" stunt from this past weekend, the one you posted about.
    Sadly, some people never learn.

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    1. Never learn what? I doubt he really believed the Earth is flat. He understood well enough how to please a crowd. I guess he could have stood to learn more about packing a parachute. Should have spent some time with our skydiveboy. But I doubt SDB would suffer a fool like him so gladly.

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    2. I wouldn't say 'surprised' but the last paragraph in that article, talks with some guy who seems unfazed by that guy's death. Like he still believes in the "flat Earth" idea. Incredible...

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    3. Just a few of my thoughts on this topic.

      First off, I did not know about this guy until it was posted here that he went in. So I looked at the video and read the article, or one of them anyway, and his friends said he actually did not believe the world to be flat, but was using that as a publicity ploy. If he was trying to go up to see if the planet is round or not, he wasn't going to find out from the heights he was reaching. He could simply have looked at the live video taken from the Felix Baumgardner balloon jump to see the answer to that silly question. That stunt was never questioned as to it being fake or not, just that it was pointless.

      Secondly I don't think it is fair to say there was any fault with his parachute, or its packing, that caused it not to fully inflate. It was not fired on purpose, but seems to have been knocked loose from the rocket coming in unintended contact with the ladder that was used for entry into the rocket. That is what I read in the article. The question I have, is why he did not activate the other two parachutes. Perhaps he was knocked out or in some way incapacitated. I doubt we will ever find out.

      jan is correct in his other observations though. I am not a fan of people doing stupid stunts that stand a good chance of causing their death. I prefer taking calculated risks for those who need excitement in their lives.

      Anyway there will always be a few who will attempt to do things that have not been done before, and that is as it should be. Were it not for all the fools who died trying to be the first to fly, along with those who did it first in Brazil or this country, it needed their efforts in order to happen. Without them we would not have the 737 Max. Well maybe I could come up with a better example.

      Thanks, jan.

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    4. I just now took another look at the video and it appears that the parachute did not fail at all, but was not attached to anything. It was an extremely low deployment and it appears to have almost opened, but had no weight below the canopy to complete the process. It is not easy to see exactly what happened. I suspect the parachute was attached to the outside of the rocket some way and was knocked free upon liftoff. It came mostly open very fast, but without anything at the lower end of the lines, it could not do anything but what it did. Anyway Hughes was still inside the rocket. I think he then flat-lined.

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    5. Rest In Pieces, Mr Hughes - too soon?

      SDB, we have discussed him in the past on this blog, I recall Jan had started something. But no surprise you didn't see/ don't recall. I wonder which agency (if any) will investigate? I doubt the locals have any expertise, and this isn't really FAA/ NTSB territory.

      His various rocket adventures were practice runs, I think his ultimate plan was to go up some distance in a balloon, and then launch a rocket from that height.

      Arguing that he could have looked at Baumgardner's video (or any other rational argument) falls, er, flat with these folks. We've had pictures of a round planet for over 60 years. I'd suggest a flat earther save a lot of money and simply email or telephone random people in India and ask them how high the sun is in the sky. After they finish laughing they (the Indians) might better understand our education system and how our current White House occupant came to be.

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    6. The first photo showing the Earth's curvature was taken over 80 years ago, by Capt. Albert Stevens, from the Explorer II balloon.

      Of course, people could see the curved shadow of the Earth during a lunar eclipse long before that.

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    7. The curved shadow is because the perimeter of the flat earth is curved; it's like a giant Frisbee.

      Aren't you paying attention?

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    8. I believe it may have been mentioned on this blog in the past, but I don't spend my time paying much attention to the flat earth society. But even if he did believe the earth is flat, which I doubt very much, he was smart enough to build a rocket that worked, and he was careful enough to launch it out in a safe area where no little piggies' straw houses were put at risk.

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    9. Mad Mike's rocket was steam powered. No flames to ignite straw houses (and it's not nice to refer to ecoarchitect that way), just a lot of huffing and puffing.

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  38. Well, at least Will Shortz didn't run today's crossword three weeks ago.

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  39. After watching a bit of last night's debate, I had a vision, a la Kekulé, of an ouroboros. Would have much preferred Franklin's snake. Though I'm afraid the Tea Partiers have appropriated a better image.

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    1. Three of my Asian students were born in the year of the Snake. All of their parents chose the year of the less favorable Snake so their offspring would have less competition in school.

      These high school Snakes were all fascinated by the Ouroboros I showed them. They had not seen it before coming here from China and Viet Nam.

      Btw, do you know why those 12 specific animals were chosen for the Chinese zodiac?

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    2. I don't think a more contentious debate has ever benzene.

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    3. I didn't have time to wade through all that but my students say the animals were chosen because they all eat apples, a lucky fruit on the New Year.



      "I don't think a more contentious debate has ever benzene." >>> So good. Ring out!

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    4. Tigers and dragons eat apples???

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    5. See John Martin and
      "Who Knew Tasmanian Tigers Eat Apples!"

      As to dragons, they could eat anything, right? Puff apples perhaps?

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  40. No,WW only magic dragons. Did I date myself to the musical reference?

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    1. I don't know if there's a direct connection, but since 1901 1st year architecture students at Cornell celebrate Dragon Day by building a large dragon from materials "found" around campus, and, with upper class students as protectors, parading it through the campus while dodging the onslaughts of evil (and jealous) engineering students who hurl ice balls with lacrosse sticks from the roofs of buildings. Back in the day melees would abound. My class built this one, the only dual gender dragon. Amazing how much unused snow fencing you can find along roadways. Not sure which feet were mine.

      Peter Yarrow graduated from Cornell in 1959, and based the lyrics on a poem by fellow student Leonard Lipton, who in turn was inspired by an Ogden Nash poem titled “Custard the Dragon”. Was there any connection to the architecture event (which is huge on campus, no way he could not have known about it)? Or was it a beatnik reference to taking a drag on one's ciggy?

      The Green Dragon is the name of the student cafe in the architecture building.

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    2. Aren't all dragons magic? Or at least imaginary?

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    3. WW . A rather fuliginous clue?

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  41. Yeowch, I think I threw out my ACCBRAT on this one.

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  42. Remember where you saw that one first, Noah.

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  44. CRIBBAGE, RIB CAGE

    "No Words." >>> From Wiki:
    As a dramatist Sir John Suckling, the inventor of CRIBBAGE, is noteworthy for applying to regular drama the accessories being used in the production of masques. His Aglaura (printed 1638) was produced at his own expense with elaborate scenery. Even the lace on the actors' coats was of real gold and silver. The play, despite its felicity of diction, lacks dramatic interest.

    "Felicity of diction"--No words quite like those words, eh?

    "19297" Hmmmm, what was I thinking?



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  45. Replies
    1. Breaking news. Corona virus in King County. I hope you wash your hands today. Remember 30 seconds is best while you sing the "Happy birthday song."

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  46. CRIBBAGE - RIBCAGE

    I’ve long wondered, considering the way scores are kept, is Cribbage a card game, or a board game?

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  47. CRIBBAGERIBCAGE. Pegged it...

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  48. Cribbage → Rib Cage

    Did you use a pen to solve this puzzle? Pen as synonymous with cage

    With twins Mr. Eding may suffer Crib Rage.

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  49. CRIBBAGE -> RIBCAGE

    I had two allusions to the word "crib" in my comment, first as a synonym for the word "cheat," and secondly in the idea of setting up our nursery. In reality, the crib has been set up since Christmas, but baby showers have brought some finishing touches that need to be taken care of.

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  50. CRIBBAGE -> RIBCAGE

    I clued Lisa Bonet because it was less obvious than MADAM I'M ADAM and I clued Nathan Lane because he had the lead in the BIRDCAGE, the US remake of La Cage Aux Folles.

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  51. CRIBBAGE (—>RIB CAGE)

    Not too difficult. There should be quite a few correct submissions this week.

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  52. Yes, cribbage and ribcage. The Composer was Zdenek Fibich. Fibich almost perfectly rhymes with cribbage. The Modest comment was for Modest Mussorgsky. I presume sdb's "Frank" was intended to be for Cesar Franck.

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    1. Nope. As I replied up above:

      My composer is Frank Bridge, whose birthday was yesterday, not Modest Mussorgsky, which somewhat rhymes with Parcheesi.

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    2. I am a little surprised at your saying Zdenek Fibich rhymes with cribbage. I checked (no pun intended) several online pronunciations all of which have it rhyming with ...itch, not ...idge. So, I guess we will have to have it out this week as did eco and ron last week. Since I may appear to be the challenger, I will allow you to choose the weapons for this duel. However I do lean towards paintball guns.

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    3. My greatest weapon is my razor sharp wit.
      In my defense, I said "Almost perfectly rhymes with the name of a composer..." I was referring to the vowel sounds. The "ich" vs. the "age" was the "almost" in almost perfectly.

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    4. And I counter with, baggage perfectly rhymes with cribbage, and Bridge almost perfectly rhymes with cribbage, but ich does not rhyme unless your plead poetic license.

      Now on to choice of weapons. I agree with your choice of "razor sharp wit," as I believe you are half way there in that regard.

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    5. Perfect! You can supply the other half!
      Now as to the time and place.

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    6. Good try, but I don't proceed only half prepared. I keep all my wits about me. Try it sometime.

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  53. CRIBBAGE -> RIBCAGE

    > Chicago [I originally posted "Olympia", but deleted that.]

    Cribbage has been played by American submariners at least since World War II. The wardroom of the oldest active attack submarine in the United States Pacific Fleet holds the personal cribbage board of World War II submarine commander and Medal of Honor recipient, Dick O'Kane, and upon the boat's decommissioning, the board is transferred to the next oldest boat. In October, it passed from USS Olympia to USS Chicago.

    > Ah, yes. Caught me napping.

    As in a crib.

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  54. On 25 March, 1968, the Monkees episode "Mijacogeo" aired, in which a game of "creebage" was played.

    Without having solved the NPR puzzle, I was interested to try to solve this one. By searching for "Monkees" transcripts, I searched for the word "game" (and then, "play"), and in short order found the "creebage."

    Had the actual episode been mentioned, this would have been even more straightforward.

    I had fun with this, but urge people to think about being able to 'solve' a hint directly. The art is in the subtlety (SDB, WW, Lego, and Blaine especially do this wondrously), so that only those 'in the know' can appreciate a reference, IMHO. Happy puzzling!

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    1. Wow! You are absolutely right!
      I am blown away. I did not expect anybody to actually sift through the Monkees episodes, but you read the transcripts?
      I'm going to take you suggestion on the hints as well. Yes, it would have been more straightforward to include more details as to the episode but I thought that might have been a little too direct. Damn!
      The episode was directed by Micky Dolenz and was called The Frodis Caper as the alternative title and Mijacogeo the main title as you found out. Supposedly the Mijacogeo was the name of a pet that the Dolenzes had that was a mixture of each family member's name. Micky was the son of actor George Dolenz and grew up in Hollywood. I move that we set up an Unknown blogger monument in your honour.
      Ya done good.

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    2. Fun stuff! To be fair, the subset of people that do the puzzle, read this blog, and try to decipher clues, is pretty small! Often when I don't have the solution, though, I do try to solve the 'meta-puzzle' clues left here, as an interesting challenge to see how resources and algorithms can work. And, one learns about even more obscure things, such as specific Monkees episodes and the existence of online transcripts (who knew?!)

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  55. cribbage, rib cage

    Last Sunday I said, “Two of the body part’s functions are specifically mentioned in an oath the U.S. Constitutional requires.” “Protect and defend,” part of the Presidential oath, are exactly what the rib cage does for the internal organs in the chest.

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  56. CRIBBAGE, RIB CAGE
    For me, it took consulting a list of eight-letter games on the Best For Puzzles website. Didn't have to go very far down the list, obviously.

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  57. Looks like a minimum of 1190 correct answers this week.

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    Replies
    1. No, I seldom submit answers! I was basing that number on what I've seen declining in the news today! Thanks, though!

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    2. I have a recurring appointment Thursdays at 3 pm EST titled "Will Shortz Snubs Me Again"...

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  58. My clues :

    I was able to solve it with time to spare so I can move onto other things today. “Spare” as in spare rib. (Sorry not clueing for bowling)

    Looks like Mr Eding was just kidding with us indeed. “Kidding” as in “ribbing”.

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    1. Actually, pins could also point to cribbage.

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  59. I enjoy art, but am not artistic, and therefor do not know how difficult a particular paining may have been, but I do know that Jackson Pollock's success was not achieved easely.

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    Replies
    1. Some puns are unpalletable and deserve to be brushed off.

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    2. Yes, and I knew I could draw you out.

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    3. Caution, if you continue with this, you might paint yourself into a corner. But if you do, you can always chalk it up to experience. Just don’t lose your tempera.

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    4. Then stop with your vile strokes as they are making quite an ugly impression. Perhaps you are in a blue period.

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    5. Now you’ve gone and Baroque it.

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    6. So Cézanne, but I still have the masters.

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  60. Replies
    1. No, just trying to make my van Gogh so I can make some Monet.

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    2. Munch on that one for a while.

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