Sunday, April 19, 2020

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 19, 2020): Boys and Body Parts

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 19, 2020): Boys and Body Parts:
Q: Name part of the human body in seven letters. The first four letters, in order, spell a familiar boy's name. The second through fifth letters, in order, also spell a familiar boy's name. What body part is it?
Change the 6th letter to the one immediately before it in the alphabet. You can rearrange the letters to spell a plural of another body part.

Edit: Hint: AREOLAE
A: EARLOBE --> EARL, ARLO

171 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. If you take away all letters that are repeated in the body part and rearrange, you get an answer that works

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  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  5. For some reason this took about two seconds. No clue here – it’s just the way it was.

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  6. Remove the 1st and 3rd letters and reverse the remaining for something you don't want.

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    Replies
    1. Nice hint, eco.
      Or, remove 3 of the body part's first 4 letters to get something worn on the body. Add two letters to this worn thing to get a third boy's name.

      LegoAddsThatTheRemovedLettersInOrderFormACommonVerbThatIsVitalToAHealthyBody

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    2. eco, I think your clue will go viral

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    3. Nice! My answer works with this clue.

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  7. I enjoyed last night's performance by the Rolling Stones.

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    1. You can't always get what you want, but sometimes you get what you need (or deserve). That's Karma.
      There is, however, one place where you can get anything you want. Except Alice, of course.

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  8. You can split a 7-letter body part into two girl's names with no overlap.

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  9. The list of Covid-19 lockdown activities is notably short: While my better half feeds the horses and picks up some milk, I take out the trash.

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  10. Blaine - thanks for teaching me a new vocabulary word and for keeping it clean here. I’ve also learned something new about the connection of this week’s answer to me personally.

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    1. That new vocab word connects loosely to this week's answer itself. Do you have something in common with Clint Eastwood?

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    2. Yes (but it’s not our bank accounts!).

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  11. Alas, ‘round here it used to be that nothing could stop the Tar Heels except their cross-town rivals.

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  12. Didn't STOM Thurmond have an out-of-wedlock son named TOMA ?

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  13. This puzzle got me thinking of disparate things like quarks, and whether there are other types of nog than eggnog. My train of thought proves that a mind is a terrible thing...

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  14. In Seattle the first hour on our NPR affiliate is aired 3 times, and the second hour 2 times. I listened to the first puzzle airing in bed and went back to sleep. I awoke to listen again to the 3rd airing. I may be wrong, but I believe they shortened it. I seem to recall that WS said his answer was 17 steps and then listed them, but then said there is a 15 step answer. Now he is saying the 15 step answer is the winner, but they have not changed it on their web site.

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  15. Sdb: I heard the 15 and 17 word answers too.

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    1. It made it sound like he was accepting his 18 word answer, and not the 16 word answer, which has now been corrected, but not on their web site.

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    2. It was confusing to say the least

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  16. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  17. Last week's puzzle, only had 100 correct submittals. As this one doesn't require jumping through linguistic hoops, I'm guessing there will be 1500 correct submittals.

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  18. The 3rd, 5th, and 6th letters also spell a boy's name.

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  19. In my 50 years on the planet, I've never met anyone named SCRO or CROT.

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  20. Replies
    1. I can't say which comment helped

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    2. Yea, any clue i made was purely subconscious as i could not come up with anything except the obvious reference to George Bush and his Frank's sign.

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    1. Jan: Were you a hall monitor?

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    2. I wasn’t sure about my comment, but if Jan says it’s TMI, it’s gone! I’ll say this instead: The body part makes me think of an actress whose first name can also be a man’s name (and was the name of an actor who was most famous around the same time, in the same medium.)

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    3. No, I wasn't a hall monitor. But, Blaine provides this forum for us, and asks us to stick to his rules, and if we police ourselves it makes it more likely that this space will remain available to us. I've had plenty of posts deleted by him, and I've deleted some on the advice of my fellow Blainevillagers.

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  22. Replies
    1. Arguably, but is "Ohns" a boy's name?

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    2. Johnson is a body part in the same way Dick, Peter, Rod, Woody, Willy, and John Thomas are.

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    3. Is this going to be another lengthy discussion?

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    4. It's not how lengthy the discussion, it's how you discuss it that makes it lengthy.

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    5. The Urban Dictionary has a contentious word from last week to add.
      And common or not, it offered an overwhelmingly better answer.
      As I have said before, for an enigmatologist Will Shortz has glaring lack of interest in, and sense of nuance in, enigmatology.

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  23. NPR has still not corrected its answer on their web page.

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    1. Still 17 steps on the site? Georgia governor is opening up state on Friday. Please God don't let me die in Georgia.

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  24. By the way, my answer submission from last week was: Large sarge surge suage stage stale stall small.

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    1. Several of us knew of that answer, but it does not qualify because suage is not a common word.

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    2. i guess you are not a metal worker.

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    3. In metal working, I've only seen it spelled swage.

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    4. Ed Norton spelled it sewage, but he never seemed too bright.

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  25. Replies
    1. Speaking of Oklahoma, are you still having the meeting of Blaine's people in the state whose postal code is the last 2 letters of Oklahoma (MA=Massachusetts)?

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    2. Bobby, I am planning on June 16th in Brewster, MA, right now. We'll see as time gets closer.

      Colorado is doing a "soft opening" May 4; 50% of businesses will be reopening. Golf courses, state parks, hair salons, will be open; schools will remain closed. . .but we are still asked to social distance when outside our homes.

      Our governor, Jared Polis, is a fantastic communicator and leader; he described well what may lie ahead for Colorado for the remainder of 2020.

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    3. I’ve been looking forward to joining you in Brewster on June 16th, but unfortunately, it’s not realistic to think I will be flying cross country by then. I hope there will be another occasion to meet some of you in person. In the meantime, stay safe and sane.

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    4. Thanks for your update, Lorenzo.

      Since we are road tripping, we have a bit more flexibility and will stay socially distanced enroute. We still hope to be with mom on her mid-June birthday.

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    5. Social distancing on a cross-country road trip could be challenging. On the other hand, it looks like gas will be cheap.

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    6. True on both accounts. But, we are adept at heading off the interstate where needed. Maybe I should buy a couple of barrels of oil now and stockpile them ;-).

      If it doesn't make sense, we won't go . . .but we've done a practice run with no public restrooms, bringing our own food, and only stopping for gas at the pump.

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    7. Word Woman,

      I would love to be there to wish your Wonderful mother the happiest of birthdays.
      Please be my proxy.

      LegoWhoSuspectsThatWordWoman'sMotherIsQuiteAWordWomanHerself!

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    8. I shall indeed, Lego. Thank you. Ninety is a big deal but if it needs to be 90+, we'll do that.

      I am so happy Maizie and I traveled to be with her in February. She is strong and healing well now.

      In the meantime, my brothers are foraging hostas for her to cook as a "wild mountain vegetable." Always something new to try!

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  26. Replies
    1. I was going to say Frank's - (sign) but that would be TMI?

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  27. No, Alabama. But you were close.

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  28. You could do the same puzzle with an AMOUNT, instead of a BODY PART.

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  29. All boys go through a phase of being obsessed with their body parts. I don't think that's the question though.

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  30. Just watching the news regarding oil prices going below 'zero $$' and am wondering if now is a good time to fill up the ol' gas tank? With negative crude oil prices, it might be the case that "they" pay me to fill up!?

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    1. https://www.theonion.com/theoretical-commodities-trader-explodes-into-flash-of-p-1842984205

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    2. Jan, maybe I'll wait one more day!

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  31. The Minuteman Commuter Bikeway in Arlington, MA, now sports Burma-Shave-type signs promoting social distancing.

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    1. Yeah, me an' Mar read 'em all as we drove past.

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  32. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  33. Back when I lived in California, there was a moment we rented a house at the Intersection of Routes 35 and 84. Up in the Mountains of La Honda. It was so beautiful up there.

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    1. I'm a little surprised this clue survived.

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  34. Bilirubin came to mind immediately. I have not been motivated to puzzle this week so I'm going with it anyway. LOL #longtimepuzzler #neveralapelpin

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  35. yes I KNOW IT DOES NOT ANSWER THE PUZZLE or have correct number of letters and isn't really a body part. I just found it amusing. #puzzlesareforfun #supportNPR #bekindonthisblog

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  36. Hello! I am a Windows Movie Maker 6 user, and I recently purchased Rehan's Shader TFX to improve the program. I need him to send me the registration code though, but I cannot seem to get in contact with him. I tried the emails on his site, but no response. I am now attempting to contact anyone and everyone who recently posted on the Windows Movie Maker Forum site (I found your name on this site and looked you up, http://www.windowsmoviemakers.net) for help with getting the Rehan Shader TFX registered and working. Please let me know if you can help me!

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    1. Chef Floyardee, as I replied to one of your other contact attempts I don't have any contact for Rehan either, beyond what's on his website

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    2. Anyone with a brain migrated off that deprecated software years ago. You’ve now spent more time trying to reviving a dead horse than it would have cost to learn and acquire new software. WTF.

      (disclosure: I was a Windows Movie Maker user and fan but geez, I also owned a 1971 Pontiac.)

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  37. Spain has announced there will be no Running of the Bulls this year in Pamploma due to the COVID-19 virus pandemic. And that's no bull.

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  38. Do we really want to start a Goringavirus? Spain's had more than enough trouble already! DD.E.

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    1. Since you ask. I happen to be an avid fan of the corrida. My post, if you happened to miss it, is nothing more than a joke, or a play on words. I used to live in Spain BTW. I would also add that if you are apposed to the corrida, you are almost certainly ignorant of its reality. I also want to exclaim my disgust with the running of the bulls in Pamploma. It is nothing more than a display of human stupidity. And another point I would like to make is that Hemingway did not really understand the corrida. Hemingway thought it was about death, as he thought everything was about, but in fact the corrida is about life and the ability of man to conquer seemingly unconquerable adversity. It is perhaps the pinnacle of performance art. It is not a sport as so many think. It may be well worth your time to actually look further into it via books, and not the internet.

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    2. sdb -- I indeed spent a couple of years in Spain and
      I went to the bullfights three times a week. The bull calves are branded when they are born and very seldom brought into contact with humans until the day of the corrida. All meat is given to the poor. Sometimes the matador can petition the judges to spare the life of particularly brave bull, which petition is usually granted. I imagine he will go on to sire some brave progeny. A bullfight is a glorious carefully choreographed ballet. My time was spent in Barcelona for the most part, and the corrida is now banned there. Anyway,it's usually American tourists who get gored in the runs. Go figure... My comment was just a play on words...No need for you lecture.
      D.E. p.s.Always sit on the shady side.

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    3. From the bull's point of view the corrida certainly seems to be about death. But they don't get to express their opinion about how this "sport" plays with them. And how do they win, other than having a slight possibility to continue living?

      Though it's become rather tacky over the years, Cirque du Soleil did show that we can be entertained without the involuntary use of animals.

      Sports where all participants are willing and have a chance at winning are noble.

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    4. DE:
      Sorry to have misunderstood your post, as I thought you had misunderstood mine. Seems to be one of the pitfalls of blogging. I was so sorry to hear of the banning of the corrida in Catalonia back in 2011. I saw El Juli and Enrique Ponce perform at Monumental. Of course their courts have since intervened and overturned that travesty of justice, but I do not know where things stand there now.

      eco:
      Bullfighting is not, nor ever was, a "sport." It is an art form. The bull is not expected or supposed to survive. If you are going to denigrate the corrida I would suggest you do some informed reading on the subject first and not revert to cliches.

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    5. I prefer art that doesn't involve killing animals. Besides the work of Dr. Mengele, what informed reading do you recommend?

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    6. I went to one and only one bullfight while visiting Spain in the early 70"s. Just appalling, so much blood, horrific. Madness. Never again. Men dressed in ridiculous outfits. I can understand Mr. Macho Hemmingway going for this kind of absurd violence,- but anyone else- I Don't get it. Just appalling. Never again. At the end the horses drag out the vanquished bull in a very undignified manner. Barbaric.

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    7. I found the right book to read: "War as Art: it's the pits and that's great" by Michael Vick. Though it's about dog fighting, not bull fighting.

      I'm on the Art in History chapter where he asserts that Jackson Pollock's only contribution was using colors other than red for his spatter patterns.

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    8. A lot of sports result in death. Humans are a cruel species. Perhaps all of those killed got together and developed covid-19 as a wining prize?

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    9. DE - I suspect you are also an aficionado of Corrida de Rej籀nes?

      BB - Right, except, again, the corrida is not a sport, but an art form. That being said, how about all the horses that die each year due to horse racing? We don't want to discuss that uncomfortable fact do we? Next to my enjoyment of a great bullfight is my enjoyment of someone arguing against it while chomping down on a ration of delicious chicken mac-nuggets, or perhaps a blood red burger.

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    10. eco - I'm wondering how you defend your enjoyment of hunting, which you informed me of recently, which is definitely a sport, and not at all fair?

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    11. SDB: Obviously you didn't follow the link I had posted of the trophies I shot. Some electrons were lost in what I imagine was a horrible digital carnage.

      I'm happy to discuss horse racing. It should also be banned, especially thoroughbred track racing where an extraordinary number of horses die, and they breed the animals to have longer right legs than left.

      I haven't had a blood red burger or chicken nuggets in almost 30 years, so I will keep arguing. I don't understand how you can justify corrida as an art form, or sport. Do you also enjoy dog fights? Please clarify the difference. Zoosadism may be a sign of psychosis.

      And BB, there is an enormous difference between deaths that may result from an accident in sports, and sports (or art forms!) that have the intention to torture, kill or cause grievous bodily injury (boxing, anyone?). The deadliest human sport is base jumping, and the rate there is about 1:2000. Those killed are willing and hopefully informed participants.

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    12. Your link does not open. I don't need to see it to know about hunting. There is no similarity between dog fights, cock fights and the art of bullfighting, but you clearly know nothing about what you are talking about. You suggested I inform you of reading on the subject. All I can think of since you asked that is what Albert Einstein had to say:
      "The height of stupidity is most clearly demonstrated by the individual who ridicules something he knows nothing about."
      Albert Einstein

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    13. It's important you understand the link to hunting, or you will remain in your ignorance. Try this: https://drive.google.com/file/d/10mFpJa4WZrEayjztFP5gEBrRUU-5mJx1/view?usp=sharing

      You still haven't proposed any profound reading that would justify the art of torturing 250,000 animals per year. I, like the people of most civilized nations, await your brilliant explanation. So do explain, oh wise one.

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    14. And name calling instead of offering reasoned arguments? Congratulations on going full Trump!

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    15. Your link still does not open. Why don't you test it before you post it?
      I suggested you read Albert Einstein's writing on stupidity. Anything else I could suggest would be a waste of time for someone as ignorant and closed minded as you. You seem to think you are the end all of knowledge on every subject under the sun. You know a great deal about architecture and some other things, but you have limits as we all do. Why is it you have never done anything with your architectural abilities? Don't think I haven't checked, because I have.

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    16. I checked the links both times (do they work for others? WW said they did when I posted them in January). But since you struggle I will tell you my hunting was with a Nikon D3400 with a 300 mm zoom lens. The animals didn't seem to mind. Or even notice.

      You still call names rather than make the merest effort to explain, so I ask you again to provide information that would open the closed minds of billions of people. One good read if you can. If you can't, I understand. I have never studied the details of the Nazi experiments on twins, Jews, Slavs and disabled, so in your estimation I must be ignorant when I say those were deplorable. Remarkable, just remarkable.

      And that you bring up absolute falsehoods (lies, as it were) about what I have or haven't done with my architectural abilities is appalling. I don't know what you checked, and really don't care. It confirms you seem to have some serious issues.

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    17. You are like a pitbull. You never let go. You accuse me of name calling while you are yourself doing it. Now you are calling me a liar. Well if I am a liar then prove it. Or would you rather I post links (that work) to your pathetic website and your accomplishments?

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    18. I did not call you a liar, I wrote that you threatened me with falsehoods. Whether they are from ignorance on your part of intentional lies is fairly irrelevant. They are false nonetheless. Parallels combine and astound.

      Interesting that you, recently the victim of personal attacks, should be the first to willfully and stridently violate Blaine's admonition that we do not do such on this blog. Sad, really.

      My website has more to do with a lack of ability in computer programming, and lack of time for constructing websites. I have also been unwilling to spend money on it; I have little interest and even less need. I have been plenty busy without having updated mine for over a decade, I do not need it for my business. You offer a pretty pathetic use of a single source for your personal attack on me, which was also, in case you hadn't noticed, completely irrelevant to the discussion at hand. There's a term for that.

      You still offer no evidence of the virtues of bullfighting. Do you have so little faith in your beliefs that you cannot provide any backing for them? I have provided a number of reasons for my beliefs, and would be happy to distill them for you again if you need.

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    19. You really are a master at distortion and "snark." At first I actually had respect for you, but when you said you wanted to read a very short piece I wrote describing an experience I had during basic training which I believe is not even a thousand words, you said you would reply in length as to what you thought of it. Well it has been over two years notw, and you keep telling me in private email that you will "maybe" actually do what you promised, but I don't even want to hear it. You proved yourself to be a flake and a phony. I long ago lost all respect for you and realized you are nothing more than a failed architect who has done nothing other than a room addition or a storage shed. You are obviously self-hating and take it out on the rest of us with your "snark." I have no intention of supplying you with works on bullfighting or anything else. Do your own research. If you are so lame at your web site then why have it at all? And why does it show nothing? Why are you listed as "inactive?" Why are you always telling us how busy you are, but seem to find the time to come up with long lists of puzzle spin offs? Yet you cannot say even say one word about the essay I emailed you? I pity you.

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    20. Wow, so your grievances boil down to my lack of offering comments on a story you sent? You really depended on me for that?

      I am not going to waste my time telling you the various projects that I have done over the years, you can live with your delusions. How I use my time (creating puzzles or otherwise) is clearly none of your business. And it is outrageous that you should assume you have an iota of say into it. And I can only hope that Blaine deletes your continued personal (and false) attacks on me. And hope that he does not opt to end all non-puzzle communication because people like you continue to violate his policy. May we not be the worse for your actions.

      Inactive listing? That's New York, where I am licensed, but have not worked for decades, and saw no reason to pay for a license I was not using. Surely you are able to check my license status in my home state, if that's your peculiar obsession.

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    21. Abraham Lincoln said it so eloquently: “You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.” I have no more time to spend with such a fool as you. You did manage to fool me for a while, and perhaps most here, but I figured you out some time ago. Now I am done trying to ignore your constant digs. I am finished with you. By by.

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    22. Best news I've had for months, though learning about your stalking is pretty creepy.

      Now you'll have more time to enjoy animals being tormented.

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    23. You really do flatter yourself.

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    24. And you embarrass yourself.

      Stalking is an apt term for someone who spends their time seeking inactive licenses.

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    25. Can I kindly suggest you both put your differences behind you? In the past, both of you have made valuable contributions to this blog. I would hate to see all of this go "poof"!
      Just a friendly suggestion!

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  39. Dr. Watson, come quick, I need you.

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  40. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. ron - Are you really buying into what this guy is selling?

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    2. Icke also thinks climate change is a hoax.

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  41. Icke thinks everything that is occurring is a conspiracy...

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    1. That I agree with. And conspiracy theories can be dangerous. I think you should delete your link. Please reconsider.

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  42. EARLOBE >>> EARL, ARLO

    "Oklahoma." There is a town called Guthrie, OK, as in ARLO Guthrie.

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    1. I was trying really hard to figure out this one word hint. Turned out to be simple after all.

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  43. EARLOBE >>> EARL & ARLO

    My Hint that was removed:
    "Not to get pedantic but I think this puzzle may have a hole in it." My earlobes have no holes in them.

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  44. EARLOBE -> EARL, ARLO

    > A well-known person with the second name has a last name that also starts with a body part.

    Arlo GUThrie

    > That new vocab word connects loosely to this week's answer itself.

    Earlobes contain loose (areolar) connective tissue.

    > Do you have something in common with Clint Eastwood?

    He has an extreme form of attached earlobe.

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    1. I thought you were referring to Sergeant Highway's summary dedecorating one of his troops.

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  45. EARLOBE (can be written as one or two words)
    EARL
    ARLO

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  46. My first comment (“I’m so glad we had this time together”) was perhaps too revealing, so I went with: “ The body part makes me think of an actress whose first name can also be a man’s name (and was the name of an actor who was most famous around the same time, in the same medium.)”

    Carol Burnett famously tugged on her EARLOBE at the end of her variety show as a way of saying hi to her grandmother. Carol O’Connor played Archie Bunker.

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  47. Earlobe>>Earl, Arlo
    My jump through hoops comment was a reference to Hoop Ear Rings - worn through the earlobe.

    And Lancek's bonus puzzle solves to Patella >> Pat, Ella

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  48. I wrote, "If you take away all letters that are repeated in the body part and rearrange, you get an answer that works." That is, LABOR.

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  49. "There are 1.4 people named ARLO for every 100,000 Americans. Based on the analysis of 100 years worth of data from the Social Security Administration's (SSA) Baby Names database, the estimated population of people named ARLO is 3,557."
    More than I would have guessed.
    121,000 for Earl.

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  50. sdb -- I'm not a fan of cockfights. However, there is a fabulous song written by Tom Russell, but the very best version is sung by Joe Ely. It's called "Gallo del Cielo" and is on you tube. One of my favorite songs of all time -- mesmerising. D.E.

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    1. DE - I'm not a fan either, but I just listened to both of those recordings and they really are good. I did not know of them before.

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  51. Well, I submitted adenoid - Aden and Deno.
    I had a student named Aden. And Deno is an alternate spelling of Dino or Deano.
    So, anyone else with the wrong answer like me?

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    1. Deborah, I, too, found this alternate back-up answer.

      At the moment Aden is more popular than Earl, by a long shot. . .

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  52. EARLOBE, EARL, ARLO.

    I wrote that this puzzle works with an AMOUNT and not just a BODY PART. Which would make the answer CARLOAD, CARL, ARLO.c

    I LOVED Rob's clue that if you "take away all letters that are repeated in the body part and rearrange, you get an answer that works.

    That answer is LABOR, which "works."

    And I wrote "ABLE clue, ROB."

    Because ABLE and ROB both hint at LABOR and EARLOBE.

    Anyway, fun puzzle.


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    1. What about your Alice's Restaurant clue above?

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  53. Mendo Jim - How many Humes and Umers are there? I didn't submit humerus, going with earlobe; but that one did come to mind early on.

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  54. Dunno about the Alice's Restaurant clue, jan; but the movie is a classic for those of us who remember THE Draft.

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  55. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  56. Do not miss cranberry's latest Cryptic Crossword Puzzle on tomorrow's Joseph Young's Puzzleria!
    It will be uploaded just 25 minutes from now.
    My hint for this week's clever NPR puzzle created by Greg Lewis was:
    "... remove 3 of the body part's first 4 letters to get something worn on the body. Add two letters to this worn thing to get a third boy's name."
    EARLOBE-EAL=ROBE
    ROBE+RT=ROBERT


    LegoRemindsAllThatALinkToPuzzzleria!CanBeFoundAtBlaine'sPuzzleLinks

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  57. Yes Jan, if you are talking to me, then I did offer an Alice's Restaurant clue.

    I did not want to mention the song or film itself, because it so directly leads to Arlo.

    But when I lived in California, we did rent one house at the intersection of 84 and 35. Which is the site of Alice's Restaurant of La Honda California.

    I miss living up there.

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    1. I've never been there, but Google Street View made it obvious what you meant by your reference to that intersection. That's why I was surprised Blaine didn't delete your clue.

      I was at the real (former) Alice's Restaurant, in Stockbridge, MA, a couple of years ago.

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  58. Blaine, what is the body part plural in your clue?

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  59. Somewhere there must be two guys named Tom and Mac who are working on a variation of this puzzle.

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  60. Blaine, I've seen enough cosplay in your annual holiday videos to think you might be interested in this appreciation.

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  61. EARLOBE—>EARL, ARLO

    I’m a bit late this week, but my clue—“take out the trash”—was a reference to Arlo Guthrie’s “Alice’s Restaurant.”

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  62. I had written: Movie Clue: The Big Sleep

    In the 1946 version of The Big Sleep, the Humphrey Bogart character often pulls on his earlobe.

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  63. My hint was a reference to Quark and Nog, two Ferengis, a species known for extensive earlobes, in the Star Trek franchise.

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  64. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from Ben Bass of Chicago, who's now making cryptograms twice a week for The New York Times. Name a famous American landmark in 8 letters. The first 4 letters in order are the first 4 letters of the name of a famous person associated with this landmark. Who is it? Here's a hint: The famous person's name also has 8 letters.

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    Replies
    1. We need a complete list of American landmarks.

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    2. Is Ben Bass of Chicago our Ben? If so, congrats!

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    3. Nope. Our Ben has *spoken* to Ben Bass. You know, about puzzles and stuff. But I am not Ben Bass. In fact, for about six years, when Ben Bass was among us, I used the name "Other Ben." But now I hold the title of "Ben."

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  65. Almost 2000 correct responses last week.

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  66. Solved easily. I’ll now treat myself to a nice Sunday morning breakfast.

    Jan - I notice something interesting here from a recent puzzle.

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