Sunday, April 26, 2020

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 26, 2020): Eight Letter Landmark

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 26, 2020): Eight Letter Landmark:
Q: Name a famous American landmark in 8 letters. The first 4 letters in order are the first 4 letters of the name of a famous person associated with this landmark. Who is it? Here's a hint: The famous person's name also has 8 letters.
Bonus puzzle: Find another 8-letter word that starts with the same two letters. It also starts and ends with the same letters as the landmark. What word is it?

Edit: The bonus puzzle answer was ALPHABET which starts with A and ends with Z.
A: ALCATRAZ --> AL CAPONE

111 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    4. Oops, sorry! The replies were all gone by the time I checked back here, but I gather my clue was too revealing.

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  3. Blaine and I seem to have come up with different solutions. I’ll just have to keep digging to see if I can find his.

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    1. I would double check your assumptions. I think you and I are headed in the same direction.

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    2. Aha! I see our favorite contributor, Ms Direction, has been at play here, as well.

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  4. Back in the day, before he became famous, Ben Bass (of “Ben Bass and Beyond”) was a frequent participant on this blog. Congrats to Ben for his NYT gig and this week’s puzzle.

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    1. Will mentioned that Ben Bass is "now making cryptograms twice a week for The New York Times". I've subscribed to the Times for decades (online now that I've moved out of the NY area), and pay an additional subscription fee for access to the crossword and other puzzles, yet this was news to me. Turns out the Times is offering Ben's cryptograms and some other new puzzles to its tree-murdering print readers only. Will, if you're still checking this blog, how about giving your socially distancing electronic fans a break, and opening up the new puzzles to us, too?

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    2. I've always enjoyed Ben Bass' contributions. For about six years, I went by the name "Other Ben" on this blog, in deference to Ben Bass.

      But he's been long gone, so I am now Lord Ben in these parts. Damn, I'm old.

      And, as Lord Ben, I will murder any tree that gets in the way of my puzzle solving.

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    3. I always thought there was something a bit fishy about his name.

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    4. ...and it kinda made me Wanda.

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    5. And, speaking of Will's other role, I don't think there's a hint in today's crossword, but I'd love to be proven wrong.

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  5. This place reminds me of one of my favorite films, a good book.

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  6. A bunch of state postal abbreviations going on here.
    Northeast

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  7. Linked movies might show that ignorance is a virtue.

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  8. Clever. A little bird solves it for me.

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  9. Nice puzzle -- and Blaine's bonus puzzle is even better! Congratulations all around.

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  10. Don’t fret; go back to the head.

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    1. My references were musical. For guitar, mandolin, etc. players, "Don't fret" might imply "Use a CAPO," and "go back to the head" refers to the musical instruction "da CAPO." Both, of course, point to Al CAPOne.

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  11. Well it' not Lord Pentland from the PENTAGON...

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  12. Probably coolest landmark in U.S. is Carhenge in Alliance, Nebraska, which i visited once. Truly breathtaking. Not sure about the name though.

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    1. Before his company returned exclusively to the manufacturing of clothing, Hamilton Carhartt made several models of 4-cylinder cars. No word on whether there are any of his cars at Carhenge, but if there are, I guess you claim he's associated with the place.

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    2. ^^^ I guess you could claim ^^^

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  13. I’m having chicken for dinner – how about you?

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    1. I don't see anything relevant above, but if you say so...

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    2. jan - Blaine removed the same comment earlier.

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    3. Ah. Sorry. Great minds think alike, I guess. I missed the deleted comments, since Blaine posted the new puzzle after I left for a bike ride, and they were gone before I could click the "Notify me" button.

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    4. Ha! I almost added the GMTA cliche to my above post. At least this week I am certain my hint (more a proof than a hint) will not be a giveaway.

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  17. This puzzle reminds me of a puzzle in 2018.

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    1. The answer to the puzzle on July 15, 2018 was Al Capone and Al Pacino.

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  18. This puzzle reminds me of one of my favorite Tandem skydiving students.

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  19. Last week, I offered a clue to the puzzle answer regarding a place I'd once lived. Jan offered a poke in my ribs, thinking I'd said too much.

    Now another "place puzzle" and I'll allow that I've lived near this one too! Not that close, though.

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  20. I'll bet the librarian from an old Star Trek episode got this one immediately.

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    1. I'm not prepared to claim that leads to the answer, but...

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  21. Risky business reaching such an exclusion, Mr. Holmes. . . er. . . jan.

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  23. No clue here, but I should also point out that the Chrysler Building in New York City was constructed by Walter Chrysler, the head of the Chrysler Corporation.

    That counts as an answer, but makes for the world's most boring puzzle.

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  25. Mozart at the National Park for the Performing Arts?

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  27. Yeah, can’t come up with any good (non-obvious) hints so am just going to relax with a Bulleit Rye or Templeton Rye.

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    1. Oh, I like that! May I bring over a fine Italian Punt e Mes sweet vermouth and some Luxardo Maraschino gourmet cocktail cherries and we can share stories after I explain my hint, which is a story in itself? I love Manhattans, as you now must have noticed. Oh, and I do hope you also have, or at least enjoy, a rye sense of humor.

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  28. Of course! Always enjoy a good story. I’m a bit old fashioned.

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    1. I'm not really a fan of those, but a Negroni, well now, that is a classic cocktail.

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  29. I'm being it isn't "Muir Wood" and "Muir, John". :-)

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  30. I shared the puzzle and a clue (it would likely get deleted here - a reference to a certain holiday) at another site I comment on. Here's one comment, after I let them know their guess was incorrect:

    "Ah. I was thinking it was the person's first name that had eight letters. Didn't read it right. I didn't think of the landmark, either. So it goes."

    I had to follow up that BOTH names have eight letters. Geez.

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  31. Replies
    1. I think I prefer the hoops. That class reminds me of when I was in jr. hi. One day one student arrived, in the mechanical drawing class I was taking, wearing a pair of sneakers that were a bright color; orange I think. The stupid teacher made him take them off. I don't think he would have approved of those outfits. Oh, and if a boy came to school in jr. hi not wearing a belt he would be sent home by the vice principal. Maybe that is why some of us would have a belt before we came to school.

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  32. Drop the 5th letter of the landmark and rearrange to name a European landmark.

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  33. Drop the first two letters and the last two letters of the name of the person to get the title of an administrator analogous to that of the person, perhaps.

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    1. ron, I watched that film, but I am not sure I find it credible.

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    2. Amy Goodman reported that climate scientists & environmentalists called this movie "misleading & destructive." See THIS.

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    3. I have watched the entire movie. This film is well worth watching. Be sure to watch comments during the credits: PLANET OF THE HUMANS. There are certain interests trying to have the film removed from youtube.

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    4. ron - I think you should say who those "certain interests" are. I watched the film too and found it disturbing to say the least. It was disturbing that it is coming from Michael Moore and yet it comes across as being put out by the corporate elites who are against those of us who are trying to stop the pollution which is destroying the planet. I found it disturbing to see Chris Hedges listed in the credits. I found it disturbing that it seemed to be attempting to discredit the leaders of the Green movement who are, and have been, trying to turn things around that are destroying the Earth. I found it disturbing that the film offered no alternative answer to the climate crisis. I just found it to be misleading, but confusing that Michael Moore would be involved in such a film.

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    5. Michael Moore and the film makers respond to criticism of their film. Click HERE.

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  35. A late in the game movie clue: Angela's Ashes

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  36. ALCATRAZ, ALCA(PONE)

    "Stroke of genius" >>> As in swimming stroke. . .《《《 I swam a 1.8 mile course near Alcatraz with 60 other swimmers starting at the South End Rowing Club of San Francisco one December. It was c-c-c-cold and exhilarating. 》》》

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  37. Alcatraz >>> Al Capone

    My Hint:
    “This puzzle reminds me of one of my favorite Tandem skydiving students.”

    I received a phone call one morning at home from a local KING TV producer for their Evening Magazine program, asking me if I was willing to do a Tandem skydive with a man 30 years my senior, Glenn Williams, and have it filmed for their program. I was told that Nathan Glenn Williams, #1103, had been America’s most prolific armed bank robber, and was incarcerated on Alcatraz for 25 years. He was originally from Eastern Washington, the son a wealthy apple grower. He had begun a life of robbing banks as a teenager, and been in and out of prison most of his life. He later told me he did not do it for the money, but for the thrill.

    He eventually managed to get out and turn his life around and began working with young prisoners at a local prison. He was the last person I would ever have thought to be involved in a life of crime. He was avuncular and extremely pleasant to be around and teach. A while after the show aired I received a phone call early one morning from Glenn, asking me if I was free to have lunch with him later that day. I told him I would love to, but I had a full schedule all day and would not be able to, but perhaps another time would work. That was the last time I had contact with him, but would have loved to have had that lunch. Later on he wrote a biography that I have never seen, and our libraries do not have copies of, but there is one copy left on Amazon.com for $150. It was self published. Even though I received my $12,00 stimulus deposit yesterday I think I will hold off on ordering it. I tried to see if I could find the filming via the station or internet, but was told they don’t go back that far with archives. I do have it on tape and DVD, but I can’t link that.

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  38. ALCATRAZ-->AL CAPONE

    A clever puzzle and clever hints this week.

    My clue: "a little bird" was an allusion to Robert Stroud, the "Birdman of Alcatraz," who ironically was not permitted by Alcatraz's regulations to keep his birds when he was transferred there for what became a 17-year stay.

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  39. Alcatraz...Al Capone

    I was somewhat surprised when my, “Nice place to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there,” comment was deleted by Blaine, as I’ve heard it used to describe many places...including my home town (New York City). But, Blaine felt it was too much of a hint, and I defer to him.

    Not wanting to further embarrass myself by being deleted twice in one week, I refrained from commenting that the solution to his cryptically worded bonus puzzle, Alluvial, was plain see.

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    1. Although "alluvial" sort of fits Blaine's bonus puzzle, I sure hope that his intended bonus word was "alphabet."

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  40. ALCATRAZAL CAPONE, perhaps its most famous inmate.

    My hint (quickly zapped by our blog administrator probably because of this Wikipedia entry): PELICAN.

    Alcatraz means Pelican:
    The first Spaniard to discover the island was Juan Manuel de Ayala in 1775, who charted San Francisco Bay and named the island “La Isla de los Alcatraces,” which translates as “The Island of the Pelicans,” from the archaic Spanish alcatraz, “pelican”, a word which was borrowed originally from Arabic: al-qaṭrās, meaning sea eagle.

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    1. muy interesante. That's right these Arabic roots words with AL in front, Alhambra, Allah, Allspice.

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    3. Don't forget Albumen, or you might end up with egg on your face.

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  41. Speaking of birds >>>

    "The razorbill or lesser auk (Alca torda) is a colonial seabird in the monotypic genus ALCA of the family Alcidae, the auks."

    I wonder if they ever feel auk-ward?

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  42. I wrote, “Linked movies might show that ignorance is a virtue.” I draw the links between _Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)_ and _Birdman of Alcatraz_.

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  43. ALCATRAZ, AL CAPONE

    > We need a complete list of American landmarks.

    From A to Z.

    > And, speaking of Will's other role, I don't think there's a hint in today's crossword, but I'd love to be proven wrong.

    The answer at 21D is MASSACRE, but there's no mention of St. Valentine's Day.

    > 4. 181

    The on-air puzzle ("Can You Guess The Homophone?") included:

    4. To make some money, the illustrator for the old Disney film has a sample _____ to _____.

    While at Alcatraz, Al Capone lived in cell 181.

    > I've been to the landmark. It's no palace. [Deleted]

    "No palace" is an anagram of "Al Capone".

    >> I'll bet the librarian from an old Star Trek episode got this one immediately.
    > I'm not prepared to claim that leads to the answer, but...

    Mr. Atoz, the librarian in the episode "All Our Yesterdays", got upset when people went through his Atavachron without being prepared. [The episode was directed by Marvin Chomsky, Noam's cousin, and featured Mariette ("I am not Mrs. James Garner") Hartley.]

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  44. Alcatraz and Al Capone. I noted that I lived near this place, and discussed on the board last week that I lived in the Bay Area. I even lived in SF. But I've never lived at Alcatraz.

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  45. Alcatraz- Al Capone.
    Harry Potter= Daniel Radcliffe= "Escape from Pretoria"
    good movie.Not as good as escape from Alcatraz.

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  46. ALCATRAZ, AL CAPONE
    Chuck had said earlier that he was having chicken for dinner. Because he was obviously alluding to the word CAPON, I asked about it being covered in alcohol. This meant you'd put CAPON inside ALE to get AL CAPONE. Now that I think about it, I should've also suggested the cartoonist AL CAPP, who created "Li'l Abner". Then again, changing one letter in PACINO and rearranging it would also have been a good clue, but that may have been giving it away a little.

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  47. My clues - posted at the end of the prior week’s page:

    Solved easily. I’ll now treat myself to a nice Sunday morning breakfast.

    Jan - I notice something interesting here from a recent puzzle.

    “I’ll” referred to isle since Alcatraz is an island.
    “Treat” was referring to rice-a-roni, the San Francisco treat.

    And Jan - perhaps you missed it, but I was referring to your Clint Eastwood comment the previous week since he starred in the Escape from Alcatraz movie.

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  48. This week's challenge comes from listener Mark Halpin of Cold Spring, Ky. Think of two common phrases in the form "___ and ___," in which the blanks stand for four-letter words. All four words in those two phrases have different first letters, but the last three letters in the words are the same. What are the phrases?

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    1. Agreed.
      The solution came quickly, but I’m still looking for a place to start clueing from.

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    2. Add two letters to the four initial letters and arrange to get a word that might be associated with the previous week's puzzle.

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    3. Paul —
      Great observation.
      I nominate you for the coveted, “Poster of the Week,” award.

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  49. There's a strong connection to a very recent puzzle.

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  50. Over 1000 correct responses this week.

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