Sunday, December 27, 2020

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 27, 2020): Never a Foot Too Far, Even

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 27, 2020): Never a Foot Too Far, Even
Q: Think of a familiar two-word phrase (5, 2). Replace the last letter with the next letter of the alphabet. The result will be a palindrome (the seven letters will read backward and forward the same). What phrase is it?
Please maintain a 2m distance.

Edit: The term is more commonly heard in Britain.
A: QUEUE UP

236 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    1. Blaine, I don't think that pushmi-pullyu is taking your advice: it's got four legs altogether, or only two feet a part.

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  2. Just solved it. But you'll have to wait for a clue.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    2. Glad I worked on it before coming here and hope this confirms my submitted solution. Great clue.

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  3. Remove all vowels. The remaining letters name a famous toy.

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  4. Only the well mannered will solve this puzzle.

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  5. I wanted to be the first to leave a clue. Damn you Dr. K.

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    1. If it's any consolation, Ben, I believe this is my first "first" on the blog. I usually take a while to solve and get as frustrated as any with my own ineptitude. Your time will surely come.

      And, in other, related news, my self-imposed moratorium on submissions ends next month. After I won in January 2020, after 30 years of entries, my wife, good egalitarian-socialist that she is, played Poe's Raven and wanted me to submit "Nevermore." Fortunately, cooler heads--namely, mine--prevailed, and I decided to take a year off. And, should it take another 30 years to win again, I do realize that on the bright side I could well be the puzzle's first centenarian.

      Best to you and yours this holiday season.

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    2. A fellow suptuagenarian. Probably won't make that next Saturn- Jupiter conjunction in 2080- either.

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    3. QUEUE UP.

      Please accept my apologies, Dr. K -- I wasn't actually complaining that you posted first. I was merely cluing the fact that I was in line behind you!

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    4. No apologies necessary, Ben. In the words of the Beatles, "I should have known better." Sometimes my credulity astounds even me. I think my autobiography would have to be titled Gullible's Travels.

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  6. An instant message from my brother's daughter is a NIECE IM.

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  7. Feeling giddy about solving this one so promptly.

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  8. The phrase is a homophone of another familiar two-word phrase.

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  9. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  10. I posted on Sun Dec 27, at 05:56:00 AM PST on last week's thread:

    The one on-air puzzle item which I had not figured out before-hand was also the only puzzle item that was ommitted!!

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  11. I posted on Sun Dec 27, at 06:02:00 AM PST on last week's thread:

    Hey, SDB. If you're having trouble with this week's puzzle, there's a local TV station which might help you figure it out when their local news gets into the sports section.

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  12. I want it, I want it, I want it, I want it!

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  13. Let x (or some other variable) = 7.

    LegoAdds"AndThenSolveFor...HeyWaitThatAin'tGonnaHelpYouSolveThisAtAll!"

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  14. I'm pretty sure I've seen the resulting palindrome as a "brand name" on Amazon selling cheapo versions of more successful products.

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  15. Replace the 6th letter of the original phrase with two other letters to get homophone of a well-known brand.

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  16. Kudos to David Curren for an elegant puzzle! I'm glad I solved it before coming here, though, because some of the early comments are pretty revealing.

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    1. Thank you! When I found out that my submission had been chosen, I was dreading the typical posts that often show up here about its being far too easy, banal, etc.

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    2. Congrats, David. (I didn't realize you were DBC.) I enjoyed the puzzle also. Yes, "elegant," Lancek, and in my case the way I solved it I'd like to think had its own share of elegance. Thank you, DBC, for the contribution.

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    3. Great puzzle. I think there will be a small number of correct answers.

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    4. Great puzzle David. Requires careful reading of the clue.

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    5. Nice puzzle, David! I just biked through your town on the Minuteman Bikeway. Do you know Steve Baggish, another puzzle contributor from Arlington?

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    6. Please accept my kudos also, David. It is a very fine puzzle (one that I am now in the process of trying to "riff-off" for the next edition of Puzzleria! (which will again upload a day early, in the wee hours of New Year's Eve day, this Thursday).

      LegoWhoNotesThat"David"IsAlsoAPalindromeIfYouReplaceItsPenultimateLetterWithADifferentOneLetterWord

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  17. I found the answer the next to last place I looked.

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  18. Hey Dr K, a “centenarian” might have an advantage to solving this puzzle. I also did a 180 after reading some of the obvious clues above that have since been “administered “ out of the blog.

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    1. That's possible. I'll have to wait and see.

      Lately, I've become fond of paradox.

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  20. Is it still considered a palindrome if the word forward and backward isn't an actual word yet reads the same both ways?

    If the answer is indeed the one that many clues are pointing to, wouldn't you also have to change the first letter in the phrase??

    I'm definitely missing something here....

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    2. DSB77: I wonder about the same question. I cannot find any rules that discuss this issue.

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    3. Some numbers are palindromes. CRISPR genetic editing stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats.

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  21. Rearrange the letters of the more American version of the phrase to get a type of flower.

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  22. This seems to be your garden-variety puzzle lately, though no anagrams involved. Incidentally there’s another homophone I don’t see mentioned above regardless of which side of the pond you live on.

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  23. Now that I solved it, my wife and I can go on to watch the movie we had gotten from Netflix.

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  24. Hey Siri? Give me a list of seven letter palandromes.

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  25. Oh, devilish tantalization of the gods!

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  26. There were no 2-week challenges this year. When will we have to wait for the next 2-week challenge?

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    1. When we can travel and congregate.

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    2. There were no 2-week challenges in the puzzle queue. We will wait in the queue for a 2-week challenge.

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  27. I wonder if the answer is considered a true palindrome. I do not know the rules. Does anyone know the rules?

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    1. AARRGGRRAA!

      I find the puzzle flawed.

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    2. WW: I do not know if it follows the rules of a palindrome.

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    3. Overall, different dictionary guidelines are equivocal.:

      Merriam-Webster.com says “word, verse, or sentence.” This seems to exclude the answer.

      Oxfordreference.com says “word, phrase, or sequence.” The “sequence” seems to allow for the answer.

      Cambridge Dictionary (dictionary.cambridge.org) says “a word or group of words that is the same when you read it forward from the beginning or backward from the end.” This seems to exclude the answer.

      Dictionary.com says “a word, line, verse, number, sentence, etc.” The “etc.” may allow for the answer.

      Wikipedia says “word, number, phrase, or other sequence of characters.” The “other sequence of characters” seems to allow for the answer.

      I wish I had my OED and my Webster’s Third New International, but at least the bookcases are finally up with some follow-up work to come (hopefully this week), and then the nearly 200 boxes of books—including the OED and Webster’s Third New International—that I haven’t seen for almost 3 years will finally get unpacked.

      Conclusion? Maybe, maybe not…

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    4. If you can call any string of random letters backwards and forwards a palindrone, then it works. Number strings, sure. But letters?

      Meh, it doesn't really work for me. Hence my capitalized example of letters above.

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    5. Excellent overview of the word "palindrome" in various lexicons, Dr. K.
      A proposed rewrite of David's excellent puzzle:
      Think of a familiar two-word phrase in 5 and 2 letters. Replace the last letter with the next letter of the alphabet. The result will read the same backward and forward. What phrase is it?

      LegoWho(SpeakingOfPalindromesAndLexicons)NotesThatThe"OED"IsTheEMERPUS"Resource("GloriaInExcelsisOED")

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    6. Thanks, Lego. Despite the scholarly trappings, I'm reminded of the following debate in Through the Looking Glass between Alice and Humpty Dumpty:

      'I don't know what you mean by "glory",' Alice said.
      Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. 'Of course you don't — till I tell you. I meant "there's a nice knock-down argument for you!"'
      'But "glory" doesn't mean "a nice knock-down argument",' Alice objected.
      'When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.'
      'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you can make words mean so many different things.'
      'The question is,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'which is to be master — that's all.'

      As my son once taught me to say to some students I needed a way to talk to, "Word."

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    7. Lego, I like your rewrite!

      Avoids the palindrome moniker altogether. . .

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    8. Dr. K: My favorite passages from Through the looking Glass!

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    9. Yes, he solved the problem. Well done, Lego.

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    10. First definition in the OED:

      "A word or a sequence of words that reads, letter for letter, the same backwards as forwards."

      So I think the intended answer does qualify.

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    11. According to this definition, the intended answer does not qualify.

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    12. One of my favorite books, miraculously just recovered a moment ago by my better half (without searching through the nearly 200 boxes of books soon to be unpacked and shelved), is I Love Me, Vol. I: S. Wordrow's Palindrome Encyclopedia by Michael Donner.

      A splendid time is guaranteed for all....

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    13. Dr. K, intriguing title...and a connection to reindeer Donner as well.

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    14. If you like "Through the looking Glass" I strongly suggest you search out the great, late Jonathan Miller's video version made in B&W with some of GB's greatest actors. DVD is best because it includes the extras which he explains his version. You will love it!

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    15. I think Will anticipated the concern about what might constitute a true palindrome, which is why he included a brief definition that would apply to this puzzle. Incidentally, "Palindrome" would be a great name for a stadium in which gladiators shoot wolves form helicopters.

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    16. Just catching up on this thread--

      WW: Yes, an intriguing title and over 400 pages of alphabetically arranged palindromes (even zip codes!). The blurb on the back cover: "I Love Me, Vol. 1 is either the largest, most throroughly researched, and most entertainingly annotated collection of palindromes ever compiled or else the ramblings of a disturbed mind. I haven't decided which. Either way, I enjoyed it."--Will Shortz

      My personal take: Highly recommended. If you can find a copy, get it.

      A P. S.: Michael Donner is the former editor of Games magazine.

      And SDB: I think I saw Miller's Alice many years ago, but I'm about to revisit it today. Many thanks for the suggestion and reminder.

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  28. Though I wouldn't necessarily call the phrase terribly "familiar," it is nonetheless pretty relevant...

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    1. If I got it right then yes, I agree not particularly familiar on this side of the pond but very relevant.

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  29. Replies
    1. Per Wikipedia, "emordnilap" is a name coined for words that spell a different word in reverse. The word was coined by Martin Gardner in his notes to C.C. Bombaugh's book Oddities and Curiosities of Words and Literature in 1961.

      An example of this is the word stressed, which is desserts spelled backward.

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    2. The Martin Gardner of Scientific American? If so, I loved The Incredible Dr Matrix.

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    3. Indeed. He's mentioned early in this article from today's New York Times about John Horton Conway's game of Life. Conway died in April from Covid-19. (Interesting side note: the final picture of Conway in the article was taken by Dith Pran, a Cambodian-born photojournalist who was the subject of the 1984 documentary, The Killing Fields.)

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  30. One of the phrase words is in the title of a relatively recent, highly acclaimed movie.

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  31. BTW, more than 2000 correct responses last week.

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  32. I don't understand why my musical clue isn't "Magical Mystery Tour"?

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  33. After all this bruhaha, I thought the answer was kind of cute!

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  34. Despite all this talk of definitions, I think I’ll stick with my original answer. Not going to be snookered in to changing it!

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  35. I still remember standing on the bridge in Ballina, watching salmon leap out of the River Moy. But I didn't realize then how easy it would be to make a salad out of them, using plain mayo, even if the recipe came from the other side of the globe.

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    1. If you google "Kewpie," which another post led me to, you may find that it is a very popular brand of mayonnaise in Japan. Mayo is, of course, a county in Ireland; its name derives from the Irish for "plain of yews." Add "easy" to the mix and you have everything you need for QUEUE UP.

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  36. A better puzzle would have been if the resulting palindrome resulted in a real word.

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    1. assuming i answered it correctly, i agree. I also think that it's a phrase that nobody that I know would use in every day conversation. I'm not sure many have even ever heard it before. Yes, I live in a multi-cultural urban US city :-)

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    2. Actually it produces three words: a culinary term, a literary one, and an anatomical one. Unfortunately none of them have made it into any dictionary in any known language--but that doesn't mean they couldn't or shouldn't if we start using them more.

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    3. QUEUEUQ = a pretentious way to refer to cucumbers, particularly the expensive kind; Queequeg's nickname; and the sound you make clearing your throat, particularly after many years of silence.

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  37. undidn’t comes to mind, unbidden

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  38. The phrase highlights a disparity of education and global exposure. Sadly, it's perfect for NPR listeners.

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  39. Santa came to my house today. Well actually I had to drive about 2 miles to his house to get the free 55" flat screen TV with remote and both stand and wall mounts. I already have a 42" and a 32" in the basement too that both work perfectly, but I wanted a larger one. WOW! Going now to watch 60 Minutes, my only TV program.

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  41. Here is an example of one of my "Riffing Off Shortz And Curren" puzzles, that will be uploaded on Puzzleria! in the wee hours of New Year's Eve Day... 24 hours before the someone (besides a New York Jet or Met) drops the ball in New York City:
    Think of something for which rodents are infamous, in 7 letters. Replace the fifth letter (a vowel) with a different vowel. The result will read the same backward and forward. For what are pesky rodents famous?
    Hint: Etymologists have an advantage in solving this puzzle.


    LegoWho(SpeakingOfDroppingTheBall)NotesThatMajorLeaguerMickeyKluttsWasChargedWith26ErrorsInHis189GamesWithTheYankeesAthleticsAndBlueJaysWhichIsA0.944FieldingPercentageWhichIsNotReallyAllThatAwfulForAnInfielderAndSoWeOughtNotMakeFunOfHimBecauseOfHisUnfortunateSurname!

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    1. This one is going to be eating away at me.

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    2. Good 'un, Lego!

      -- LancekWhoWantedToPostThatAfterYourWonderfulSundayEquationButFearedThatItMightBeTMI

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    3. A cut above current puzzle.

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    4. That I got. This week's challenge I ain't got.

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    5. Nice, Lego. Knowing the answer to Lego's puzzle does help, Cranberry, if you're still waiting to solve the week's challenge.

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  42. The puzzle a few weeks ago worked better on this side of the "pond" -- this one is better on the other side...

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  43. It's not too hard -- you'll get it figured out anon.

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  44. A peek at the PM's transcript from ol' Enigmatology U would show better grades for his Anagram courses than the ones on Palindromes.
    My gut feeling is that the original phrase spoken backward and phonetically is unfortunately apt.

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  45. Last week we had some celebrations, including BLINI, LA! At one point it was time for a PHOTO, HO!. At the boatyard, I had to remind the foreman MASKS AL! And to get him to help someone, MASTS AL!

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  46. Replies
    1. According to Michael Donner, this was the creation of Leigh Mercer, "a shadowy but first-rate creator of palindromes." A variant is "Eva, can I pose as Aesop in a cave?"

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    2. I prefer "I love me Vol.I" This may have also been written by our outgoing chief. Or may be written in the near future by them- only $99.95- at your local bookstore.

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  47. This was also the first character to use the word "trek" in the series.

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  48. Slate's film critic, Justin Chang, describes the movie, Tenet as "deliriously palindromic".

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  49. I first tried -un event- but i think that is bass ackwards. But i do hate it when i am unevented. And then i have an uneventful weekend.

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  50. For the "Mother of all [puzzle] palindromes", see here

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  51. ET LA MARINE VA VENIR A MALTE.

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  52. Maybe the puzzle would have been better stated if it had said the answer is palindromic rather than it being an actual palindrome.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Natasha,

      Thanks again for deleting another of your posts so that now when I post in reply no one will understand my reply.

      When I posted palindromic, I thought I might be making up a new word. I just now did a google search and it shows along with the root word palindrome, but then I checked MW and they list it as having a medical definition. It has to do with something being recurrent, such as rheumatism. Before I got to that full explanation I thought if it has a medical meaning, it must be like when Donald Trump defecates and it backs up and emerges out of his mouth in a press conference or the like.

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    3. Sdb: I asked: What is definition of palindromic? As you know. I thought a stupid question and deleted.But then looked it up and found same MW definition as you did.
      There were other more obvious definitions too. You did what I hoped you would do. I deleted perhaps too soon ...I thought as you may not have seen it. But I thought you might not get my point. But you did! Message was only meant for you anyway and I gambled you saw it quickly.

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    4. No, Natasha. You did not delete "too soon." You deleted. You are the only person here who does this repeatedly. It is annoying and it makes you appear to be an insecure 7th grader who is ashamed of everything she says. I have tried over and over to help you get over it, but you continue. Have the courage of your convictions and if they seem stupid, well then just deal with it and move on.

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    6. Too bad "Computer aided design" has taken over the word.

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    8. I can make an honest attempt to address low self esteem, but I don't have the expertise necessary to address self-loathing.

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    9. The words of Joseph Welch come to mind.

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    10. I can understand that. But you shouldn't take it as a personal attack against you, as mine is.

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    12. MJ what was that term you coined TSI? The Seattle ? .

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    13. Joseph and I don't remember.

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  53. From a quick skimming of I Love Me, Vol.1:


    A dog! A panic in a pagoda!

    amoral aroma

    A slut nixes sex in Tulsa.

    Boston, O do not sob!

    Camus sees sumac.

    Deified? Mistress asserts I’m deified!

    Devil never even lived.

    Did I do, O God, did I as I said I’d do? Good, I did!

    Ed, I saw Harpo Marx ram Oprah W. aside.

    Elk City, Kansas, is a snaky tickle!

    I did, did I?

    Lewd did I live & evil I did dwel.

    Live not on evil.

    Name no one, man!

    No darn Radon!

    “Pure” Boston did not sober up!

    Rise to vote, Sir.

    Sex at noon taxes.

    Stressed, are we now to do two New Era desserts?

    ’Tis sent! I wed a mermaid—airy, mad, I’m amid a myriad, I am remade, witness it!


    Enjoy. Unless you suffer from aibohphobia…

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  54. Anyone else enjoy historian Heather Cox Richardson and her historical perspective on current U. S. events? She weaves a fascinating story daily with her "Letters From an American."

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    1. Interesting title. It was first coined as Letter From Paris, by Janet Flanner.

      Janet Flanner | American writer | Britannica
      www.britannica.com

      Flanner was the child of Quakers. She attended the University of Chicago in 1912–14 and then returned to Indianapolis and took a job with the Indianapolis Star, becoming the paper’s first movie critic in 1916. She married but later divorced, and throughout the rest of her life her most passionate relationships were with women. After a sojourn in New York City, she traveled throughout Europe, eventually settling in Paris in 1922. She lived there until 1975 (except for the war years 1939–44). She was hired by Harold Ross in 1925 to write a periodic “Letter from Paris” for his new magazine, The New Yorker. Signed GenĂȘt, the articles contained observations on politics, art, theatre, French culture, and various personalities.

      She was also a major WWII war correspondent. Later other New Yorker writers copied her title with Letter from (your city here).

      I ran into her in the bar in the Continental Hotel, where she lived permanently, when I was visiting Paris in 1965. It was an interesting encounter. She was an amazing personality.

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    2. Interesting. And before Janet Flanner there was 1782's Hector St. John de Crevecoeur book “Letters from an American Farmer.”

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    3. Yes. My wife follows her blog and Facebook posts closely and on occasion passes them on to me. Richardson's thoughtful and knowledgeable, a welcome combination these days. Coincidentally, we're good friends with a Graduate School Dean at BC (where Richardson teaches and also where our daughter earned her PhD and how we got to know the Dean), and she of course knows Richardson well. Small world.

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    4. Dr. K, glad your family follows her. I read her letters first thing every morning. Today's missive on the distribution of the vaccine and 45's waning influence is spot on.

      Wild that you know the Dean at Boston College. Cox Richardson is both knowledgable and a decent human being. I often attend her Tuesday and Thursday seminars from Maine.

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    5. My wife gets her letter every morning, and passes many on to me.

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    6. What did you think of the New York Times article about HCR? Not their finest journalistic effort, IMHO. As a follow-up, HCR wrote that we are all in this community of Americans trying to right our ship of democracy.

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    7. I realize this appears that I am trying to change the subject, and I will plead guilty, just to get that out of the way, because my mention of Janet Flanner got me to thinking about when she was a guest on The Dick Cavet Show along with Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer. It is one of the most amazing and interesting discussions ever seen on TV and I encourage you to watch it:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nb1w_qoioOk

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    8. WW: You've probably read it already, but I just read HCR's December 30 post summarizing the past 40 years (and then some). Spot on.

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    9. Yes, Dr. Cox Richardson's perspective is both clear and spot on. Glad you are also enjoying her words.

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  55. Apropos palindromes and Martin Gardner's Mathematical Games column in Scientific American: he once did a column on palindromes, and in that column he gave the following as the best example he knew, for combined length and naturalness: "Straw! No, too stupid a fad! I put soot on warts." I remembered it ever since. (Martin Gardner did cite the author of the palindrome; THAT I don't remember.)

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    1. Great comment, DNRosenblum.
      I too recall that particular Mathematical Games column in Scientific American. I am reasonably certain that Gardner cited another great palindrome created by by a British mathematiciannamed Peter Hilton:
      Doc, note: I dissent. A fast never prevents a fatness. I diet on cod.
      I wish to thank geofan for his comment above (Tue Dec 29, 11:02:00 AM PST) in which he links to my "mother of all palindromes" in the July 19, 2019 Puzzleria!
      A few years earlier, in March of 2016, I posted on Puzzleria! a shorter, more accessible and somewhat less-strained palindrome-puzzle, which also featured an accompanying limerical verse.
      It is titled “Bro, flog a golf orb!” It is the second appetizer on that week's Appetizer Menu.

      OgelAdbmal

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    2. Gardner attributes, ``Straw! ...'' to Leigh Mercer (1893–1977) of London. See ``Martin Gardner's 6th Book of Mathematical Diversions from Scientific American,'' page 146, which is in the chapter Word Ways. Gardner calls Mercer ``one of the greatest living palindromists'' [in 1964 or so when Gardner wrote that] and notes that he came up with the famous, ``A man, a plan, a canal—Panama!'' Gardner also writes, ``An unpublished Mercer palindrome, which is also something of a tongue twister, is `Top step's pup's pet spot.'''

      Wikipedia has a wonderful mathematical limerick by Mercer at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leigh_Mercer

      In the chapter Palindromes: Words and Numbers, page 246, in ``Mathematical Circus,'' Gardner writes, ``I limit myself to one palindrome that is not well known, yet is remarkable for both its length and naturalness: "Doc note, I dissent. A fast never prevents a fatness. I diet on cod." It won a prize for James Michie in a palindrome contest sponsored by the New Statesman in England; results were published in the issue for May 5, 1967.'' But Lego might be right about Hilton:

      https://www.vocabulary.com/articles/wc/the-palindrome-game-of-the-enigma-codebreakers

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  56. Ogel admal sounds very middle -eastern to me.

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  57. RIP Dawn Wells, AKA Mary Ann Summers from Gilligan's Island, 82, of Covid-19.

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  58. D

    Dennis, Nell, Edna, Leon, Nedra, Anita, Rolf, Nora, Alice, Carol, Leo, Jane, Reed, Dena, Dale, Basil, Rae, Penny, Lana, Dave, Denny, Lena, Ida, Bernadette, Ben, Ray, Lila, Nina, Jo, Ira, Mara, Sara, Mario, Jan, Ina, Lily, Arne, Bette, Dan, Reba, Diane, Lynn, Ed, Eva, Dana, Lynne, Pearl, Isabel, Ada, Ned, Dee, Rena, Joel, Lora, Cecil, Aaron, Flora, Tina, Arden, Noel, and Ellen sinned.

    OK Ben, fess up.

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    1. Big deal. I looked up palindromes late last night and he copied that one down verbatim! BTW I finally solved the challenge, and I'm glad we're not revealing it today! I still might have a shot(or not, I don't care)!
      pjbSaysThere'sAlwaysNextYear

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    2. Lancek: All I did was copy and paste it from one of many places it is available.
      I have made a few impressive palindromes though, with longest 14 letters in four (or three, I can't remember) words. Want to buy it?

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  59. Patrick J. Berry (our friend, "cranberry") has created a 15-by-15 grid of great wordplay that we will feature on Puzzleria! this week. It is his 18th Cryptic Crossword to grace our puzzle blog.
    (Puzzleria! will celebrate its seventh anniversary this coming May.)
    The new edition of Puzzleria! will be uploaded this week in the wee hours of Thursday morning, on New Year's Eve, which is a day earlier than normal Friday-morning upload.
    That is to say, our New Year's edition of Puzzleria! will be available in just about six-and-a-half hours from now.
    Other morsels on our menu this week:
    * a Schpuzzle of the week asking what mathematical property 2021 shares with 27 previous years,
    * a "What's this phrase in the news" puzzle,
    * an "Amen Corner" Dessert,
    * eleven Riffing Off Shortz And Curren puzzles.
    Please stop by and sample our "bewildering wares."

    LegoCryptically

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  60. QUEUE UPQUEUEUQ

    My “wait your turn” to Dr. K was not allowed by the blog administrator...

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  61. QUEUE UP —> QUEUEUQ

    My clue: “ But you’ll have to wait for a clue."

    About Lego’s posted puzzle, my hint: “Knowing (the answer)…” —> “gnawing” (a one vowel difference from "knowing")—> gnawang

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  62. I wrote, ”Remove all vowels. The remaining letters name a famous toy.” That’s the Kewpie Doll.

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  63. My early Sunday hint was:
    "Let x (or some other variable) = 7."
    "Some other variable substituting for x" might be q, or "queue."
    The result, if you choose to replace the "queue" in "queue up" with "7", is 7-up!

    LegoWhoRemindsAllOfBlainesvilleThatThisWeek'sPuzzleriaWithAWonderfulCrypticCrosswordPuzzleCreatedBy"cranberry"WasUploadedDuringThisMorning'sWeeHoursSoPleaseStopByandSay"Hi!"

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    1. I thought you were hinting that if x = 7, then w = 6, v = 5, u = 4, t = 3, s = 2, r = 1, and q is the starting point.

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    2. I liked that one. I wanted to comment "Good 'un, Lego" (7-Up being the self-proclaimed "un-cola"), but I didn't want to give it away, so I tossed out that compliment later on Lego's rodent riff.

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  64. I first ran across this word on the back of a Beatles record describing what their fans (in England, of course) did to see the Beatles.
    Happy New Year!
    I hope it's a happy news year!

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  65. Sorry, I missed my cue, it's queue.

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  66. QUEUE UP.

    And, please, Dr. K -- I wasn't actually complaining that you posted first. I was merely cluing the fact that I was in line behind you!

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  67. QUEUE UP

    > The phrase is a homophone of another familiar two-word phrase.

    "Cue up"

    > I don't understand why my musical clue isn't "Magical Mystery Tour"?

    It'd make more sense to QUEUE UP for the Mystery Tour. What the hell does "roll up" mean in this context, unless you're a pillbug?

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  68. I posted on Sun Dec 27, at 06:13:00 AM PST as well as on Sun Dec 27, at 06:02:00 AM PST on last week's thread:

    Hey, SDB. If you're having trouble with this week's puzzle, there's a local TV station which might help you figure it out when their local news gets into the sports section.

    On KCPQ, Channel 13, and also on their satellite station KZJO, Channel 22 on their local news, when they move into the sports section, they show some local sports personality saying "Hi, this is <their name, sports organization, and their position with that organization> and it's time to Q it up!"

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    1. In Seattle right? Steve Raible?

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    2. Technically, they're Tacoma stations (and KZJO would be KCPQ's sister station, not it's satellite), but yes, they're carried by the cable systems in Seattle as well as in my city, Bellingham.
      Steve Raible was with KIRO-TV, Channel 7, but he retired early this year.
      The main sports anchor at Q13 is Aaron Levine, although I always prefer Michelle Ludtka; a beautiful woman; got married this year, but dammit, not to me!!! :-(

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    3. I graduated from Western in 73." I love Bellingham. My wife's niece is a sophomore there. Go Vikings.
      Was Q13 a Fox affiliate? Happy New Year.

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  69. My clues -

    Hey Dr K, a “centenarian” might have an advantage to solving this puzzle. I also did a 180 after reading some of the obvious clues above that have since been “administered “ out of the blog.- the centenarian referred to a Q- Tip, slang for an old person. The 180 referred to a u- turn, aka “UE” (given the multiple UE sequences.

    This seems to be your garden-variety puzzle lately, though no anagrams involved. Incidentally there’s another homophone I don’t see mentioned above regardless of which side of the pond you live on.- this referred to Kew Gardens, in London or Queens NY.

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  70. QUEUE UP >>> QUEUEUQ

    "Fishy" I think the puzzle is flawed as QUEUEUQ is not a word or phrase. Any string of letters being a palindrome? It doesn't do it for me.

    "Reptile" Apparently "Form a Crocodile" means to QUEUE UP.

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  71. Queue-UP. Queueuq.
    First person to use the term "Trek" on the series. This was Q.

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  72. Queue up was my answer. My post references the fact that "queue" is more often used in the UK, whereas in the States "line up" or "wait in line" is a more common phrase. My indication of this phrase being relevant refers to not only the fact that during the holiday season we're often standing in lines at the post office or stores, but the fact that during this pandemic we're often relegated to standing in lines (on pre-marked spots) to avoid clumping too many patrons close together. Not to mention the long lines of people waiting to get COVID tests...

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  73. All best wishes for health and happiness as well as more civility and kindness here in Blainesville and in the world for 2021.

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  74. queue up

    Change the P to a Q to get the palindrome "queue uq".

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  75. My clue of “the sound of silence” refers to the fact that “queue” is essentially “a” followed by line of silent letters

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    1. Correction:
      My clue of “the sound of silence” refers to the fact that “queue” is essentially “q” followed by line of silent letters

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  76. Change U to TI. to obtain QUEUE TIP from QUEUE UP.

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  77. To one and all, Happy New Year. May 2021 bring health, prosperity, and good will.

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  78. While we are spelling things backwards, "queue up" becomes "pueueuq," which I pointed out on Monday is phonetically pretty close to "puke."
    Early in the discussion many seemed to think this might be apt.

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  79. QUEUE UP(QUEUEUQ)
    Happy New Year to all. May 2021 be way better than the previous one. May we get that vaccine sooner than later.

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    1. Sorry PJB, but that is not likely to happen. I know I am sounding pessimistic, but I am only being realistic as I have been all along, but ignored. Joe Biden is not going to be our savior. He is simply a small retreat to the past, and will not do anything to move us ahead. Only thing he will do is attempt to re-attain the past, which is what got us all here in the first place. It will be us, the people, who may make things change for the better for us all, not some politician. I see complacency as now being our new enemy. We must make it happen, or it is doomed to fail. How is that for a happy new year message?

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    2. Happy New Year to you too, SDB(that is, whatever constitutes being happy for you).
      pjbThinksSDBMakesDebbieDownerLookLikePollyanna

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