Sunday, February 21, 2021

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 21, 2021): All We Are is Dust in the Wind

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 21, 2021): All We Are is Dust in the Wind
Q: Think of a famous philosopher — first and last names. Change one letter in the first name to get a popular dish. Drop two letters from the last name and rearrange the result to get the kind of cuisine of this dish. What is it?
It's not Aristotle, Plato or Socrates.
A: Friedrich Nietzsche --> Fried rice, Chinese

218 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. A numerical cinematic musical literary clue, five steps to the philosopher: 9000.

    ReplyDelete
  3. A powerful puzzle. There's no evidence that the philosopher ever ate this food.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Getting the answer made me a happy person.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Lots of musical clues. I'm thinking of a particular song from the early '00s, but I'll offer no further clues lest I get penalized.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Replies
    1. Even your friendly nutritionist could solve this one...

      Delete
  7. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  8. For the second operation, do we start with the original philosopher's name or do we start with the dish?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But do we rearrange the last name (with dropped letters) with the original first name or with the first name altered to the dish name? The puzzle is not clear.

      Delete
    2. Drop two letters from the the Philosopher's last name and rearrange the remaining letters from the last name.

      Delete
    3. 1: Change one letter in the first name to get the dish

      2: Drop two letters from the last name and rearrange those letters to get the cuisine. This part doesn't involve the letters from the first name at all.

      Delete
    4. so for step 1, no rearrangement required? Just drop a letter and it spells a dish?

      Delete
    5. "Change one letter in the first name. . .

      Delete
    6. Darned if I didn't hear "drop" the first time through. Actually found the name and wished it had said "change." And it did.

      Delete
    7. Ah got it ... and got it.

      I happen to love this food.

      Delete
  9. Looks like you can get the food delivered too.

    ReplyDelete
  10. My solution was ready for pickup in about 10 minutes.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. From the website...

      "This week's challenge comes from listener Andrew Chaikin, of San Francisco."

      Delete
  12. Interestingly enough, instead of dropping two letters from the last name, you can simply change three.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More specifically, change two and drop one. Rearranging still required.

      Delete
  13. With a little imagination you can make another dish (of a different type of cuisine) from the leftovers.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Man there is nothing so good as a Goatfried Blin(t)z!!! Yum!!!

    ReplyDelete
  15. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Bonus puzzle: Take the name of another philosopher. Drop one letter from first name. Then drop one letter from the last name and rearrange the remaining letters of the last name. The resulting two words describe an apathetic part of the body.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I can’t say much fir the philosophy, but I often prepare the dish.

    ReplyDelete
  18. The dish is sometimes made with an herb that sounds like a place where the philosopher lived.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Low Marx if you Kant solve this one.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Got it, twelve seconds. I feel very clever.

    ReplyDelete
  21. If you change the last letter of the philosopher's last name to L, then you can rearrange the letters to get a type of meat.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I saw Blaine's hint, but I still say a Plate is a popular dish. And, it has a complete absence of cuisine.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I came back to this puzzle a whole lot of times before I got it.

    ReplyDelete
  24. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  25. An anagram? Ooooh. I wonder if this dish has Basil in it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Take the type of puzzle this is, replace three letters with a "y," rearrange, and you'll have how I'm starting to feel about these types of puzzles.

      Delete
  26. Movie Clue (apparently good for several of these puzzles): The Man Who Would Be King.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I make this dish, but it's always different based on what's left over. When I make it, the type of cuisine is Jewish!

    ReplyDelete
  28. (I was sure the dish would be "chili", but I couldn't find two letters to drop from "Anagonye" to make "Mexican".)

    ReplyDelete
  29. This puzzle was a lot easier for me than last weeks. I still have some feelings leftover from that one!

    ReplyDelete
  30. I solved this immediately, but even with some hints that would be deleted on this site, my friends could not behold the answer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is" by Friedrich Nietzsche

      Delete
  31. Two musical clues this week.

    One is REM.

    And the other, of course, is Monty Python. It's never a bad time to post the "Bruce's Philosophers Song," which is one of the two "list songs" I can actually stand.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLodkaDHn4g

    And I can confirm with 100% absolute certainty that the name of our philosopher this week is EITHER IN or NOT IN the Bruce's song. But it's always a great listen.

    Take it away, Eric Idle.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLodkaDHn4g

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm Still Standing (Elton John) immediately came to my mind. Was just not up to putting in the work to find anything as clever as yours.

      Delete
    2. " The greatest minds are capable of great vices as well as great virtues." Rene Descarte

      Delete
    3. "I'm still standing, better than I ever did. Feeling like a true survivor, feeling like a little kid"(John/Taupin). “What does not kill me makes me stronger if I put in the work” (Frederich Nietzsche).

      Delete
  32. I got the answer quickly after I stopped trying to make the first name of another philosopher work with his last name that does work.

    ReplyDelete
  33. This is even clumsier than most of Will's rearranging "puzzles."

    ReplyDelete
  34. Try this alternate puzzle:

    Think of a famous philosopher — first and last names. Replace the last letter in the first name with NET to get an ingredient used to make food commonly served in European countries. Drop two letters from the last name and rearrange the result to get when that food is likely served.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Drop the first two letters of that last name, and it's nothing short of another philosopher.

      Delete
    2. Descartes --> scartes, just O short of Socrates.

      Delete
    3. ANSWER:

      René Descartes Add NET to get RENNET then remove CA and get an anagram of DESSERT. Europeans, and myself too, frequently enjoy cheese for dessert.

      Delete
  35. When I look in the refrigerator I just hope that the leftovers don't have eyes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When a famous chef dies does the obituary usually refer his relatives as leftovers?

      Delete
    2. This was an echo of Nietzche's famous aphorism "When you gaze into the abyss, the abyss also gazes into you" without giving too much away.

      Delete
  36. I made blueberry scones this morning. Hell hath no fury like a woman sconed. . .

    ReplyDelete
  37. It's taking me longer to come up with a clue, than it took me to solve the puzzle. I am now craving this cuisine for lunch. I think I will just order it via Uber Eats, and enjoy the rest of my day.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Is it true that for breakfast most birds prefer NESTCAFÉ?

    ReplyDelete
  39. It's not William of Occham, either.

    ReplyDelete
  40. This puzzle would have been better at a different time of year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Though I can also see relevance to this time of year too!

      Delete
    2. A company of the same name is located where its products are not currently in demand. -LT

      Delete
  41. The answer is related to a movie, and it’s not Alien like last week.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Replies
    1. I believe our friend GB is trying to goad me into giving a hint to this fine NPR puzzle. I have not been able do that, however, because I did not solve the puzzle until this morning. I believe the hint GB had in mind for me to give is related to an athlete who was a "beast" on the field (and would have really been a beast had his uniform number contained three rather than two digits.
      But here is another hint:
      Set-up:
      GB knows that I am a Green Bay Packer fan who roots also for the Minnesota Vikings when they are not playing the Packers (or when the Vikings were playing the Packers during the two years Favre was wearing Purple). I live in Minnesota but was born and reared (lots of spanking... old joke!) in Wisconsin.
      The hint proper:
      Both the Packers and Vikings have been blessed with great quarterbacks:
      For the Vikings: Tarkenton, Kramer, Culpepper, Gannon, Kapp, Favre...
      For the Packers: Starr, Hadl, Majkowski, Rodgers, Favre...
      My hint to this week's NPR puzzle involves something associated with one of the Viking quarterbacks.
      That's it.

      LegoWhoMissesGB'sPithyWittyAndWiseCommentsAndHisPresenceOverOnPuzzleria!

      Delete
    2. Seattle Seahawks player Marshawn Lynch was known as "Beast Mode." Number 24?

      Delete
    3. ManyThanks,LegoLambeau:OneWhoCanMakeAPuzzleOutOfAnything,EspeciallyMinceLamb(WithFourLettersDropped)Related,AndWithApologiesFromThisAuthorForTrademarkInfringement!

      Delete
    4. My goodness, GB, you must remember to breathe!
      pjbBelievesIt'sThePauseThatRefreshes,NotTheSoftDrink!

      Delete
  43. Coincidence, or spooky AI good enough to figure out the answer from our clues? The ad that appears on this page, in my browser window, is for a chain restaurant (that I've never been to or ordered from or Googled) that offers the answer dish on its menu.

    ReplyDelete
  44. That's spelled "Big Brother", jan.

    ReplyDelete
  45. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  46. In response to Blaine's clue, I don't think it is Confucius either. Or Averroes, Cometan, Diogenes, Epictetus, Epicurus, Gorgias, Hypatia, Voltaire or Seneca.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Seems to be a few Epicurean foodies here.

      Delete
  47. In french, bacon is called bacon. So next time you're in France, have some of France's Bacon. If you rearrange letters, can you just put them back where you found them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I got this one rather quickly. Probably the fourth in a long list of philosophers. It was so obvious what the first name would become, I had to perform the next step on the last, and sure enough it worked!
      And now, since a few others here have posted bonus puzzles in the same vein, I thought I'd do so too:
      1. What somewhat-famous philosopher has a last name which, if you replace the first letter with that of his first name, you get a type of vegetable?
      2. What somewhat-famous philosopher's last name contains all the letters(in a different order, of course)of his first name, except one?
      3. What two philosopher's names can be formed from the following two anagrams:
      BAMA CLUSTER
      BROIL HENS
      pjbWillRevealOnThursdaySameAsAllOthersWill

      Delete
    2. One of them pairs well with France's Bacon.

      Delete
    3. Chicken cooker doesn't appear on my list of 111 famous philosophers.

      Delete
    4. Still working on first one Cranberry. Closest i have is Reinhold Utabaga. But i think he is pretty obscure.

      Delete
    5. Ah yes. Utabaga, if I remember correctly, worked closely with Philo Arsnip and Aubrey Sparagus.
      pjbShowingThereIsADifferenceBetweenAPhilosopherAndA"WiseGuy"NyukNyukNyuk

      Delete
    6. LOL. I think you are on a roll. Perhaps potato?

      Delete
    7. And it's Galileo Galilei?
      Galileo liked his Gallo. A half gallon every hour.

      Delete
    8. No, PS. My #2 philosopher requires a little more rearrangement of the letters.
      pjbNotReallySureIfAScaramoucheWereToEvenKnowHowToDoTheFandangoInTheFirstPlace

      Delete
    9. FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, FRIED RICE, CHINESE
      And now, the answers to my bonus puzzles:
      1. CHARLES BABBAGE(CABBAGE)
      2. ALFRED ADLER(all letters except the F)
      3. ALBERT CAMUS, NIELS BOHR
      pjbNietzscheSaidGodIsDead,ButNowGodSaysNietzscheIsDead

      Delete
  48. BTW I've solved the other two bonus puzzles(not the one describing how Lee Wichman feels about such puzzles).
    pjbSays"IThinkNot",AndThenPoof!Disappears!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. pjb, where did you get that clever idea for a signature that runs words together separated by Capital Letters?

      Delete
    2. Legolambda did it first. I've sort of "riffed off" his style. Surely you must have seen him do it many times before.
      pjbBelievesIfYouMust"Borrow"Ideas,BorrowFromTheBest

      Delete
    3. Yes.
      sKYDIVEbOYwHOhASbEENaWAREoFtHISfORyEARSnOWhONEST

      Delete
  49. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  50. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  51. I'm sure everyone noticed that with a little more invasive pre-rearrangement manipulation you can get a likely spicier regional cuisine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. I got some frozen chickens. Probably from Texas.

      Delete
  52. I can't believe how quickly FreeBrewery is passing this year.

    ReplyDelete
  53. A cantata perhaps? "I am the Walrus."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Walrus was of course a reference to the picts of Mr. Nietsche. Friedrice and Chinese.

      Delete
  54. It is interesting that there are a few famous philosophers whose last names can work with this puzzle.

    Unknown/LT - I enjoyed your clue.

    ReplyDelete
  55. It would have been fun if it had turned out to be chopped liver. But then again, one can't have everything!

    ReplyDelete
  56. FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, FRIED RICE, CHINESE

    "I made blueberry scones this morning. Hell HATH no fury like a woman sconed. . . " >>> NIETZSCHE wrote Human, All Too Human, the source of HATH in my clue. >>>

    Or. . ." A joke is an epigram on the death of a feeling." (FN)

    "It is." Fried rice is rather (fried) rich.

    " t^5 " refers to the 5 t's in the German phrase for NIETZSCHE'S "God is dead" >>> "Gott ist tot."

    ReplyDelete
  57. FRIED RICE + CHINESE (<— FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE)

    My clue—“I came back to this puzzle a whole lot of times before I got it”—alluded to Nietzsche’s concept of the eternal return.

    “Numerical clue: 341”--the numbered passage in Nietzsche’s The Gay Science that deals with eternal recurrence (aka eternal return).

    ReplyDelete
  58. FRIEDRICH NIETZCHE -> FRIED RICE, CHINESE

    > Movie Clue (apparently good for several of these puzzles): The Man Who Would Be King.

    Last fall, skydiveboy used "Peachy" to clue Michael Caine. I learned from a college bathroom wall that Nietzche is Pietzche.

    > Be serious!

    B. (for Bacillus) cereus poisoning is known as "fried rice syndrome" because of its association with that dish.

    > It's not William of Occham, either.

    "Occham" anagrams to "McChao", McDonald's fried rice offering in China.

    > Mitch and Elaine?

    "McChao" could also be a cute name for the former Senate Majority Leader and the former Transportation Secretary.

    > Coincidence, or spooky AI good enough to figure out the answer from our clues? The ad that appears on this page, in my browser window, is for a chain restaurant (that I've never been to or ordered from or Googled) that offers the answer dish on its menu.

    Bonchon serves fried rice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. On the subject of McChao, when I lived in Koreatown 40 years ago there was a Chinese restaurant on Vermont whose sign read:

      CHOP SUEY
      C
      . H
      A
      O'
      S

      which we always read as "CHOP SUEY CHAOS." An appealing image if you like that sort of thing.

      Delete
    2. Well the formatting betrayed me: imagine Chao's being in a vertical line starting just below the space between "CHOP" and "SUEY."

      Delete
  59. FRIEDRICH (H to E) NIETZSCHE (-TZ) → FRIED RICECHINESE.

    My clue/hint: “FRIEndly Nutritionist” → FRIEdrich Nietzsche.

    ReplyDelete
  60. I wrote, “A numerical cinematic musical literary clue, five steps to the philosopher: 9000.” 9000 hints at Hal 9000 which (who) was the computer in _2001: A Space Odyssey_, which featured prominently Richard Strauss’s tone poem _Also Sprach Zarathustra_ which was named after the philosophical novel by Nietzsche.

    ReplyDelete
  61. FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE >>> FRIED RICE & CHINESE

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. skydive boy—I just saw, on your recommendation, Incident at Loch Ness. Shades of The Blair Witch Project, Christopher Guest films, Day for Night, etc. Thanks for the suggestion.

      Delete
    2. Dr. K,
      I agree with you, except that this film was done well. I watched it again on dvd this week and then, in the EXTRAS, watched it again with the commentary audio turned on, which is more of the same, and also worth watching. I think this film is a gem. Glad you enjoyed it.

      Delete
    3. I watched the extras, too, with audio. At the expense of the naive viewer, a great deal of fun was had by all.

      Delete
    4. Still the loss of life in making a film is regrettable.

      Delete
    5. Now, another film of note: Have you seen Merry Christmas Mister Lawrence? The extras are not to be missed either.

      Delete
    6. No, I've not seen it. I'll check it out.

      Delete
  62. Scanning a list of philosophers, the Nietzsche / Szechwan possibility occurred to me, but, as it didn't fit the puzzle directions, I paid little attention to "Friedrich". I probably wouldn't have seen "fried rice" right away anyway, even though I know Will often neglects to signal when a single word gets changed into a multi-word phrase.
    Leo's "powerful puzzle" comment prompted me to take a second look. So, the letters that had initially drawn my attention to the answer turned out to be the ones that had to be removed.

    ZT sounds like ZITI.

    I appreciated related comments by Lancek and Italo Svevo.

    ReplyDelete
  63. More "Puzzle Fun by Bobby Jacobs" is featured on tonight's Puzzleria! (uploaded in the wee hours of every Friday morning since May 9, 2014).
    "Chef Bobby" has baked us up a pair of puzzles pertaining, fittingly, to "Restaurants and Food"... but music-makers and world geography also come into play.
    Very tasty brain food!
    Our menus this week also include:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week about a Doctor and two Kings (that has nothing at all to do with Doctor Martin Luther King),
    * a "Compleat Angler Slice" consisting of catching fish and creating critters,
    * a Dessert Titled "The story of the Torys (sp)?" (this one hasnothing at all to do with either stories or Tories (no matter how you spell it), and
    * eight pretty decent riff-offs of Andrew Chaikin's Chinese Fried Rice NPR puzzle...
    Speaking of which, my two hints to the NPR puzzle (in my response to GB's post) included:
    1. An allusion to "an athlete who was a 'beast' on the field (and would have really been a beast had his uniform number contained three rather than two digits)."
    2. "...something associated with one of the Viking quarterbacks." That QB is Tommy Kramer, who played his college ball at Rice University.

    LegoWhoPlayedHisCollegeBallAtSaintJohn'sUniversity

    ReplyDelete
  64. "I wonder if this dish has Basil in it." Nietzshe "became the youngest person ever to hold the Chair of Classical Philology at the University of Basel." BTW, I saw a really interesting three episode series on Netflix called Genius of the Modern World. The three hour-long parts were on Nietzshe, Karl Marx, and Sigmund Freud.

    ReplyDelete
  65. My clue, "A company of the same name is located where its products are not currently in demand," referred to Friedrich Air Conditioner Company, based in San Antonio, and the recent frigid weather there. -LT

    ReplyDelete
  66. Yes, Nietzsche, the king of the one liners

    ReplyDelete
  67. Friedrich – change the “h” to an “e” --> fried rice
    Nietzsche – remove “tz” and rearrange --> Chinese

    Last Sunday I wrote, “The answer is related to a movie, and it’s not Alien like last week.” Nietzsche wrote the book, Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Then, based on the book, Richard Strauss wrote Op. 30, Also sprach Zarathustra. Then Stanley Kubrick used some of the music in his film, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Friedrich Nietzsche->fried rice, Chinese

    Change the H in Friedrich to E to get "fried rice". Remove TZ from Nietzsche to get "Chinese".

    ReplyDelete
  69. My clue about the puzzle being better at a different time of year was a reference to Christmas when a certain population (represented here) is known to order in Chinese food. Of course, the current time of year has relevance due to recent Chinese New Year. My later clue was reference to Descartes (dessert) and Aquinas (Asian) whose first names didn’t cooperate!

    ReplyDelete
  70. From now on I will think of this guy as Fried Rice Nietzsche ...

    ReplyDelete
  71. The puzzle reminded me of my husband's Uncle Fred, who explained that his father (also Frederick) would sometimes call him "Freed", which he liked, but would other times call him "Fried", which he disliked.

    ReplyDelete
  72. FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE -> FRIED RICE, CHINESE.

    I clued "I feel very clever" because Nietzsche wrote the immodestly titled "Why I Am So Clever."

    And then I clued Monty Python and REM as musical clues because of REM's hit "I Am Superman," and Nietzsche's concept fo the Übermensch.

    Alas, no Übermensch am I, I didn't get the call.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Frozen chickens from Texas are "ice hens" ----> Chinese

    ReplyDelete
  74. The remedy for frozen branches over power lines is a "fir deicer" → Fried rice.

    ReplyDelete
  75. Keep forgetting to do this on time.
    Freidrich Nietzsche
    Fried rice/Chinese

    My hint involved ordering take-out via Uber Eats. According to the web: In 1883, Nietzsche coined the term "Übermensch" to describe the higher state to which he felt men might aspire.

    ReplyDelete
  76. Forgot to post (Friedrich Nietzsche...Fried Rice/Chinese) yesterday. But I have an excuse. Wednesday afternoon I was notified by the county Board of Health that I could make an appointment to get vaccinated against COVID-19. I received my first dose yesterday.

    With that at the forefront of my mind, I lost track of the puzzle calendar.

    Other than some soreness, and a sense that we may soon be seeing the light at the end of this tunnel, I’m experiencing no side effects.

    See you Sunday!



    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Here in Massachusetts, you check a website, and if there are any vaccination appointments available (there aren't), you can enter a "waiting room" so you can find out, when you get to the front of the line after a bit of delay, that those appointments have already been taken.

      Delete
    2. Good news, SuperZee. Here in SC, Jan, there are a number of options, including sites in NC. My wife monitored the various sites, found a cancellation, and got her first shot (in SC) this past Monday; her 2nd will be in 3 weeks or so. I'll be getting my 2nd tomorrow at a local site.

      Delete
    3. Wow, superZ, how have you been feeling? I know someone who had vaccine and felt a bit nauseous for a while, then felt better.

      Delete
    4. I got the Moderna first shot two weeks ago on Thursday 2/11. Next one will be Thursday 3/11. So I am almost there. No problems; my injection site was very slightly sore for 2 or 3 days, but only if I happened to bump it, and only for a moment. I expect, from what some have told me, that there may be more noticeable reactions after the second shot, but I kinda doubt it. I was able to obtain both appointments at my health clinic that is just a 4 block walk from my house. Many others here are having considerable trouble getting vaccinated. Thanks DJT.

      Delete
    5. My only side effect has been localized discomfort at the vaccination site. Its been sort of a dull ache - but as soon as I get involved in anything, it drops below the radar.

      Delete
  77. Got shot Wed. Well run show did 1200 in our little town in about 4 hours. Nationwide needs 250,000 of these for the first round.
    Pfizer must use smaller chips. Arm is just tender today and my GPS only lost a little accuracy..

    ReplyDelete
  78. First Moderna shot for me was this Wednesday. Have an appointment for my second shot a month later on March 24th. A little sensitive around the poke for a day but only when pushed on. Philadelphia's "system" for distributing the vaccine is not worthy of the name, "system,"

    ReplyDelete
  79. I got my first Pfizer shot on Feb 16 with second one scheduled for Mar 9. BUT, it involves a round trip of 140 Miles!

    ReplyDelete
  80. Replies
    1. Old farts are the best farts (less stinky).

      Delete
    2. WW You really are my favorite person on this blog. Thank you

      Delete
    3. Clark a pseudonym, thank you. You are most kind.

      Delete
    4. I just had my second Moderna shot this morning. No 140-mile round trip, however, just a 5-minute drive to the local supermarket pharmacy. If, Clark a pseudonym, you're an old fart because of an "early" first shot on Feb. 16, I shudder to think what my Jan. 30 first shot makes me.

      Delete
    5. Anyone who thinks old farts are less stinky needs a Covid test right away.

      Delete
    6. I agree. Farts come in a wide range from stealth farts all the way to shock and awe farts and this is independent of age.

      Delete
    7. Au contraire, messieurs, farts that have been around awhile dissipate. . .

      Talk about your pet peeves.

      Delete
    8. Is a dissipated fart still a fart? If a tree farts in the forest, and there's no one there to smell it, does it stink? If there's water on Mars, but it's all dissipated into space, is there water on Mars? If only we had an (anagrammable>) philosopher around!

      Delete
    9. jan, you raise some interesting questions. I do not have all the answers, but I have little doubt that Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park stinks even when the entire park is shut down.

      Delete
    10. In order to get to the bottom of this conundrum perhaps we should implore the Mayo Clinic to assign their crack investigative team to try and solve it.

      Delete
    11. Actually, Old Faithful is not very stinky at all. Fountain paint pots and Sulphur Caldron are another story.

      If my brother gets a dog, I shall recommend he name it Peeve so he will be able to introduce his Pet Peeve. Works on so many levels...

      Delete
    12. ...especially if it's a French poodle.

      Delete
  81. Man, I didn't think I would start a fart stream. Now that I think of it, what a gross phase I just used!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. C a p, perhaps it is rather grody unless your "fart" stream is in Swedish, a quiet SPEED stream. . .which sounds like a good strategy for farts (see Silent But Deadly).

      Delete
  82. SDB, After WW, you are my second favorite on this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  83. Got my second shot today also (first was Jan. 30) ... if I feel tired, there's a nap for that!!

    ReplyDelete