Sunday, June 27, 2021

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 27, 2021): Japanese and Mexican Food

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 27, 2021): Japanese and Mexican Food
Q: Take the name of a major American city. Hidden inside it in consecutive letters is the name of a Japanese food. Remove that. The remaining letters can be rearranged to spell some Mexican foods. Name the city and the foods.
At least we aren't looking for a pair of synonyms.

Edit: SACRAMENTO anagrams to SCENT and AROMA, a puzzle that has appeared twice now. I was just glad this wasn't the third time.
A: SACRAMENTO --> RAMEN, TACOS

137 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Take the letters of the city in the even numbered positions. Rearrange. You get a type of house.

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    1. Take the remaining letters, the odd numbered positions. Rearrange to obtain a social system.

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  3. Seems kinda messy to me. --Margaret G.

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  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  5. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  6. I've never been to the city. I don't care for either of the foods. I still got it! 😊

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  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  8. After a long hiatus, the return of the anagram!

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    Replies
    1. It's a little chilly this morning. . .

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    2. There should be LOTS of correct entries this week. Maybe even more than last week.

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    3. LOTS, as in OODLES of correct answers.

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  9. The Japanese food anagrams to two other common English words, and the Mexican food anagrams to three. There may be others that are less common.

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  10. This is one of those puzzles that has me glad we have a world map and a USA map on the wall in the kitchen. No hint here.

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  11. The two foods are sometimes combined.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  12. A similar Asian food always strikes me as unreal.

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  13. This one rings a bell. I must tend to a sick friend this week so this will be it for now.

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  14. Like last week's, this puzzle has the makings of another 2,500+ Affair.

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  15. There’s a religious connection here, too.

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  16. Replies
    1. I think I got your hint already...But I am looking forward to your hint on Tuesday

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  17. The city anagrams to a certain type of professional and a certain society.

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    Replies
    1. In an astonishing coincidence, the city also anagrams to two other edible foods.

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  18. If you forego tea you may get love

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  19. Replies
    1. Sacramento can be anagrammed into "aroma" and "scent". There was a puzzle with Sacramento->aroma, scent on January 6, 2019.

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  20. The city has been a puzzle answer twice before.

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  21. You can get both foods in one restaurant in the city.

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  22. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. I got it, thanks to one or two of the above posts.

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    2. I'm not getting it, but I like the picture because it reminds me of the upcoming Little League World Series.
      Also, reading Blaine's edit of last week's post makes me wonder if a Mazda in reverse goes Mmmmh.
      No hint here (at least I hope not).

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  23. An easier puzzle -- I didn't need my usual nine attempts to solve it.

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  24. The US bishops might take issue with this puzzle.

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  25. Definitely a “B” rated puzzle

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  26. Two clues >>>

    DC

    Ghost plagioclase

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    Replies
    1. Offset laminariales, my darling Word Woman.

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    2. DDX, kelp! Drawing a strong connection between offset laminariales and ghost plagioclase is not that easy.

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    3. About 2 degrees south and 3 degrees east of your Zany Box Kept Him clue. I enjoy looking up your scientific clues. Especially when I know the answer!

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  27. Find a different Japanese food hidden in order though not consecutively within a famous person's 11-letter name

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  28. Even though it has the rearranging thing, I like this puzzle.

    Today's on-air "contestant" was one of the best ever. WS could hardly give the clues fast enough.

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  29. Here is a sneak preview of a riff-off of this week's NPR puzzle that will appear this Friday on Puzzleria!:
    Take the name of a major American city. Hidden inside it in consecutive letters is the name of an Asian island. Remove that. The remaining letters can be rearranged to to spell the name of a European island. Name the city and the islands.
    (Please do not post an answer here (or on Puzzleria!) until Wednesday, July 7 at Noon PDT. Hints, of course, are welcome.)

    LegoRiffRaffling

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  30. I was expecting it to take a while to solve, but I got the answer while still in bed and it was the 5th city I thought of. Way too easy, but not really a bad puzzle.

    You may believe you have many friends, but think of all the Menudon't know.

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  31. Television clue: Portia de Rossi.

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    Replies
    1. (Arrested Development fans may remember the nonexistent town of Sacramende.)

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  32. I hope this is not TMI, but this puzzle has 2 connections with last week's puzzle. You can drive to this city in a Mazda and there is probably someone living there named Wanda.

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    1. If there was a puzzler named Wanda with a Mazda, she should have been the default contestant. I feel a limerick coming on but the first line should end with Wanda. Hard to rhyme Mazda.

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    2. Beach Boy Mike Loved (or else was just Fonda)
      Car-crazed groupies named Wanda and Rhonda.
      Wanda goofed though and caused a
      Bad vibe, bought a Mazda!
      Rhonda rode, though, a little red Honda.

      Lego(WhoOnPuzzleria!ThisWeek)Asks(AndAnswers!)The(Oil)BurningQuestion:"Why would Wanda want a Honda?"

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  33. Two of my nieces live there, and I'm seeing them both this week for the first time since lockdown.

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    Replies
    1. Enjoy your visit. I saw family 2 weeks ago, after 2 years because of lockdown. I am still teary.

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    2. I haven't seen any of my family since shortly before the pandemic. I don't even know where their "ashes" are.

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  34. I think this puzzle is so cute. Who knew? I think both of these foods can actually be found served in the same meal. Sounds different, but it's a fusion-street-truck thing in my city.

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  35. No clue here, but I did just notice that the town of Charlotte, North Carolina contains a prostitute.

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    Replies
    1. I'm sure they have more than one, especially if you count politicians.

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    2. I am sure you are right about that, but since I am so liberal I thought this once I would try being conservative just to see what it might feel like.

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  36. I can think of an appropriate beverage to enjoy with these foods in this locale.

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  37. I like to eat one of the foods, but not the other.
    pjbDoesLike"TurningJapanese"And"MexicanRadio"Equally,Though

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  38. Replies
    1. Is that any kind of an actual reply, Ben?
      pjbSaw"E"AndThought"WTF?!"

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    2. Okay, to be honest, my clue is really "NOT e"

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  39. No clue, just a fact. It's almost painful to not get a puzzle answer that most of you think is easy. But, I did say "almost painful" One must be philosophical in these situations.

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    1. No shame in continuing to try and work on puzzles and only get half of them, Clark. That's a great way to spend time, in my book.

      I would say something trite like "the journey is the reward," but then I would have to punch myself in the nose -- and it is just too hot today for that.

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  40. Don't associate this food with Japanese cuisine. Too fast food. Even for me, a roller coaster man....

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  41. Clarification: I don't think of this as Japanese food.

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  42. The Red Wings used to feast on these.

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    1. Red Wings fans in the 50s started throwing octopuses on the ice when their team was in the Stanley Cup because it took eight wins to win the Cup. Japanese for "octopus" is "tako." You can take it from there.

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  43. I suddenly got the answer. Don't understand why it took me so long. Oh well, better late than...too trite!

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  44. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. Hey C a p, a comment similar to yours was blog administrated. So. . .

      Glad you got it, though.

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    2. WW,It was a true fact about my son when he was going to CU.

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    3. Of course. But too much of something that is a letter off from tripe, methinks.

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  45. What you don't know can hurt you, and also hides inside it in consecutive letters the name of a related Japanese food

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  46. NYAGHHHH- Someone relevant to the answer.

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  47. Wordsmythe here, here'a another clue:
    George Carlin's one liners. It's hilarious!

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  48. My post near the top was deleted.

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    Replies
    1. Because I used the word TOP, as in both Ramen and Taco.

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  49. Some people put cinnamon on these dishes. Others even use pears.

    Oh, wait, that isn't what you said?

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  50. SACRAMENTO, RAMEN, TACOS

    "It's a little chilly this morning. . ." refers to yet another anagram of TACOS, i.e. COATS.

    "Right on!" refers to a rite or SACRAMENT.

    "Sweat" >>> Sweat Bee >>> Sacramento Bee

    "DC" >>> SacraMENTO and Diet Coke, a classic science experiment

    "Ghost plagioclase" refers to recycled oceanic crust as in the recycled puzzle city that is this week's offering.

    "Of course. But too much of something that is a letter off from tripe, methinks." >>> The trope of college students slurping ramen is quite well-known.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks WW for explaining your response to me.

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    2. C a p, no problem. S l u r p!

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    3. I recall buying 20 Maruchan ramen packets for a dollar (on sale). No wonder they are/were so popular for college students. It was dinner for a nickel!

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  51. SACRAMENTO, California.

    RAMEN (A Japanese noodle soup)

    SACTO → TACOS

    The two synonyms from the last time this city was used (Jan. 6, 2019) that Blaine was referring to → SCENT + AROMA = SACRAMENTO.

    Even-numbered letters anagram to MANOR (type of house) & the odd-numbered letters anagram to CASTE (social system).

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  52. Sacramento, capital of the U.S. state of California.

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    1. Your Submission: Sacramento, capital of the U.S. state of California. Ramen & Tacos.

      I meant to post the foods too, which I submitted, but my cut & paste missed the foods because they were on the line below and I just got back home from camping on the ocean and missed seeing it.

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  53. Sacramento --> ramen, tacos

    Last Sunday I said, “There’s a religious connection here, too.” Remove the “o” from “Sacramento” and you have “sacrament.” Remove the “r” from “ramen” and you have “amen.”

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    1. My connection was FSM-Flying Spaghetti Monster. Spaghetti, Ramen, colanders, pirates, parrots, rum, and so much more

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  54. I wrote, “Take the letters of the city in the even numbered positions. Rearrange. You get a type of house.” That’s MANOR.

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  55. SACRAMENTO—>RAMEN, TACOS

    For anagram fans:

    “Ramen” has two anagrams: “namer” and “reman.”
    “Tacos” has three: “ascot,” “coast,” and “coats.”

    And “Sacramento” has two other food anagrams: “acorns” (edible if properly prepared) and “meat.”

    This week, it's likely there will be many correct puzzle responses.

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  57. Sacramento; ramen; tacos. My clue said this puzzle had the “makings” (referring to the Sacramento Kings) of another 2,500+ “Affair” (referring to “The Thomas Crown Affair”, another reference to the Kings).

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  58. SACRAMENTO -> RAMEN, TACOS

    > The city has been a puzzle answer twice before.

    On January 13, 2019, and on December 6, 2006.

    > You can get both foods in one restaurant in the city.

    Or, <a href="sactacos.com/”>both together, at Sac Tacos!</a>

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  59. SACRAMENTO – RAMEN – TACOS

    My “clues”:

    The city anagrams to a certain type of professional and a certain society.
    “Sacramento” anagrams to “actor” and “Mensa.”

    I got it, thanks to one or two of the above posts.
    That was a reply to a post that was subsequently removed by the author. The reference was to Blaine’s clue, At least we aren't looking for a pair of synonyms. “Sacramento” anagrams to “scent” and “aroma.” I got it after one or two posts made references to the foods smelling good.

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  60. "I glided right into this one."
    A synonym of "glide" might have been TMI.
    I wanted to post a straightforward numerical clue, but ... ask a simple question: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=shortest+distance+from+Sacramento+to+the+coast&t=h_&ia=web

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  61. Sacramento- ramen, Tacos
    27- my clue as Sacramento Bee is 27th largest paper in US. Who knew.

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  62. SACRAMENTO -> RAMEN, TACOS

    My clue was "e" but I changed it to "not e"

    E is East
    Not E is West
    California is the biggest of the Western States.
    SACRAMENTO is its capital.

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  63. We invite you to an Independence Day Picnic tomorrow on Puzzleria!, dished up by our friend Ecoarchitect.
    Eco has prepared a spread of 50 rebuses (one for each star on Old Glory!) and packed them neatly into a picnic basket.
    He titles it:
    The 2021 [1] Y (6,2,4) [2] Thero (8) Again! Picnic Menu
    (The first two rebus puzzles appear in the title [1] and [2], with answers of 6, 4 and 2 letters and 8 letters respectively.)
    Ecoarchitect asks: "Is therea better way to celebrate our national heritage than by blowing up small bits of it?"
    His answer is a resounding "YES! By doing a Declaration og Rebus Interdependence!
    Except for the riff-offs of the NPR puzzle, our other puzzles will also have patriotic themes.

    LegoRebitically

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  64. SACRAMENTO(capital of Calif.), RAMEN, TACOS
    I prefer TACOS to RAMEN. The latter tastes too salty.
    pjbAlreadyHasTheFirstTwoRebuses,BTW

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  65. Sacramento ramen tacos : B rated puzzle - Sacramento Bee newspaper

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  66. Yesterday was the second time in as many weeks when l didn’t get to post. Here is my belated entry. I’ll try to do better next week…

    Here is what I want to post, but couldn’t…

    Sacramento/Ramen/Tacos

    The similar Asian food which strikes me as unreal is the Vietnamese noodle soup, pho, often mispronounced, faux.

    Wishing all a safe, healthy, and enjoyable Independence Day Weekend!

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  67. Here's my belated entry since I was busy this week.
    Ramen, tacos, Sacramento, no surprise.
    My hint "This rings a bell" is a reference to the bells rung at the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass during the elevation of the host. That's a reference to to the "sacrament" of Sacramento as well as reference to Joseph Young's Taco Bell/Tacoma/Ma Bell puzzle of two weeks ago.
    The second clue, the George Carlin one-liner is: Top ramen sounds a lot better than bottom ramen."
    There you are, the sacred and the (almost) profane.
    Happy 4th!

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  68. My clue about an appropriate beverage for this puzzle was a reference to Sacramento tomato juice.

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  69. When I posted a clue about my son eating this Japanese food in college, I didn't realize that it was so generalizable and that it was common to all.

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  70. Hey, this hasn't happened in quite awhile! Minutes to go before the new puzzle is unveiled, and we do NOT have to click "Load more..." and again go to the end after each refresh!

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  71. This week's challenge comes from Todd McClary, who's a member of the National Puzzlers' League. Think of a place where a plant might grow, in two words. Spoonerize it — that is, switch the initial consonant or consonants of the two words. The result will name another place where a plant might grow, and a plant that might grow in either place.

    Happy Fourth, everyone!

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  72. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from Todd McClary, who's a member of the National Puzzlers' League. Think of a place where a plant might grow, in two words. Spoonerize it — that is, switch the initial consonant or consonants of the two words. The result will name another place where a plant might grow, and a plant that might grow in either place.

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  73. Looking over the list of on-air puzzles, I'm stuck on "brainstorm", and if "San ___, California" is what I think it is, I object ... but I'll probably be overruled.

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    1. Paul, I don't have a problem with San______, CA, and I think I've got "brainstorm," though it's arguable. (Think more generically, and pronounce carefully.)

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    2. Well, I was thinking of "brainstorm" as a verb rather than a noun, and I was suggesting that the California city might be pronounced more like a "low-grade breakfast food" with the sole purpose of casting a shadow of a doubt.

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    3. I may be on to something....

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