Sunday, October 10, 2021

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 10, 2021): Start Your Day Off Right

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 10, 2021): Start Your Day Off Right
Q: Name something you might eat for breakfast, in two words. Add a "G" at the end of the first word. Switch the middle two letters of the second word. Then reverse the order of the two words. You'll name an old-fashioned activity. What is it?
No help needed on this one.

You may need little help on the puzzle but you'll need lots of help on the activity.
A: RAISIN BRAN --> BARN RAISING

206 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. One of my favorite breakfasts, often enjoyed while reading the headlines.

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  3. Take the breakfast. Remove all repeated letters. You are left with something used in making ancient cosmetics.

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    Replies
    1. Oh, good, this confirms the answer I came up with!

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    2. Courtney must know something I don't. Rob, do you mean all appearances of the repeated letters, or just the repeat appearances? Either way, I say yuck to those ancient cosmetics.

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    3. >...do you mean all appearances of
      > the repeated letters, or just
      >the repeat appearances?

      The former.

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  4. 720 correct responses last week.

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    Replies
    1. Hello Jan, are you in the math field, and if so, do you have a website. I am hoping to write to you with a question related to math and Boston area. Thank you!

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    2. Hi, sorry, no to both. I'm a retired physician associate.

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    3. Good morning and thank you, Jan! I appreciate you.

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  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. I am disappointed to see that this was removed. I thought it was beautifully phrased, and a very well disguised indication that ron had solved the puzzle.

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  6. A pretty regular Sunday Puzzle offering -- clever, but not very hard to solve.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. (A wish to be "regular" is one reason to eat Raisin Bran; you could say that is its raison d'etre. Or if your sluggish system just needs some physical activity, barn raising would work, too.)

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    2. Ah, yes, those grapes do have a raisin d'etre!

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  7. I would say what Rob said, but more ceramics than makeup.

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  8. One cuts through wood, while the other cuts through water. You can cut the third with a bridge. See?

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  9. Got it. I would have had it faster, but I spent too much time searching for a breakfast food called lvoe makin.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for this. For some reason I had interpreted the last step as reverse the letters rather than reverse the words.

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    2. As the old joke goes, “Sure beats a ham sandwich….”

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    3. I think I heard that Ivoe makin cures COVID.

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    4. Admittedly, my comment works better if you view the stream in Arial font.

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    5. Thanks for the laugh, Lancek!

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  10. Connections, connections, connections.

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  11. Take the British name for the old-fashioned activity. Drop the 3rd letter and rearrange to name a body of water.

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  12. Wow. Two exclusive news items on Weekend Edition Sunday this morning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Two scoops of raisins in Kellogg's raisin bran.

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  13. I am reminded of Michael Caine.

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  14. Replies
    1. The movie title is a rephrasing of the old-fashioned activity. The "G" is gone.

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  15. I have fallen into the very healthy habit of solving the second part of the puzzle first. Activity handed me the key.

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  16. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    Replies
    1. it wasn't pumpkin must have been heroin :-)

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  17. Not a clue just a fact...The answer popped into my head as I was falling asleep. Now I can go back to bed!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I solved it the same way, except it was after awakening from my nap.

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  18. A certain controversial monarch comes to mind...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's Bran Stark, who (SPOILER ALERT) was crowned king in the final episode of a (SPOILER ALERT) pretty terrible final season of GoT.

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  19. This is MY PUZZLE.
    Exactly as submitted over a year ago:
    Name a popular food product, two words. Switch the words, making the first word last and last word first.
    Flip-flop two letters in the now first word, then add an apostrophe to the now second word, to name an event with a long history here in the United States. What is the product and what is the event?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Siz, your puzzle wording is clearer to me.

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    2. Yeah me too.
      Or maybe not *clearer*, but much less awkward.

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    3. Thank you, WW. I think it leaves the event name more like it would actually be said, as well, no?

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    4. Siz, yes. It makes the question clearer and makes the answer less obvious -- an $800 Jeopardy! response.

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    5. My congratulations to Siz on creating an NPR-worthy puzzle, but also my condolences for not getting credit for it.
      On Puzzleria! each week we post a handful of "riff-offs" of whatever the current NPR puzzle happens to be. I just wrote the following riff-off of Kerry Fowler's (and Siz's) fine NPR puzzle. (Give hints if you like, but no answers please. I will not reveal the answer until Wednesday, October 20 on Puzzleria!)
      Here's the riff:
      Name something you might eat for breakfast, in three words of 5, 4 and 6 letters. Reverse the order of the three words. Add a “G” at the end of the new first word. Replace the second word with a one-letter word. Divide the new third word in two parts, then replace the first letter of the second part with an “FL”. The result is a four-word phrase that is a “no-no” for infielders (even though it may not affect their pitcher’s “no-no”).
      What might you eat for breakfast? What is a “no-no” for infielders?


      LegoWhoWasInThe(Size#?)ShoesOfSizAFewYearsBack

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    6. The same thing happened to me two or three years ago. Will rejected a puzzle that I had submitted and then used it on the air a year or so later without any acknowledgment.

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    7. Hint for Lego's riff-off: The third word of the answer can also be something you might buy at a ball game. (No rule against posting riff-off hints here instead of Puzzleria!, right?)

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    8. Splendid hint, Nodd. Thanks for posting it. If it's okay with Blaine, it's okay with me.
      (Incidently, it is very kind of Blaine to allow me to post these occasional puzzles and to shamelessly plug Puzzleria! on this outstanding space. We are truly blessed to be able to "play" here. We simply cannot thank Blaine enough! And, we should never take his unwavering presence and remarkable talents for granted.)

      LegoWhoIsOlderThanBlaineButStillWants"ToBeJustLikeBlaine"WhenHeGrowsUp!

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    9. Ditto your comment re Blaine. Truly an outstanding blog host.

      Delete
  20. Sorry, folks, but today's my anniversary. Even though I solved it, any hint or hints will have to wait 'til tomorrow.

    Mañana.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy anniversary! 10/10 -- a memorable date.

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    2. Happy Anniversary! You have your priorities in order. Enjoy the day.

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    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    4. Thank you, WW and WW (posting on the WWW!), for the kind words. A splendid time was had by all.

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  21. Replies
    1. be a double dippah and take both

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    2. P-smith:amzn delivered W A's gr8t its I now get your comment

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    3. Marjorie Merriweather Post ( a little bit bettah) had Mar-a-lago built. Whereas Dr Kellogg formulated ready to eat breakfast cereals in his sanitarium in Battle Creek. ( best to you double dip = two scoops)

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  22. I used my mind to solve this.

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    Replies
    1. My mind is a brain. The distinct letters in "Raisin Bran" can be rearranged to spell "brain".

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  23. I was pretty grouchy earlier, but now I've had my breakfast and coffee, and solved the puzzle, feeling much better!

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  24. I like this puzzle.
    It is just difficult enough to solve that it feels good to do so.
    And it reinforces Blaine's hint rule: Don't spoil it for others.

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  25. My only post this week is to say you don’t need an MBA to solve this one.

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  26. Replies
    1. That was going to be my clue. That’s weir’d.

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  27. Tex Beneke, Head East, Four Preps

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    Replies
    1. Kalamzaoo (Tex Beneke vocals on Glen Miller band) Head East Twenty Six Miles ( 4 Preps) and you are in Battle Creek, MI home of the best to you each morn

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  28. Replies
    1. You still want that Clinton quote?

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    2. I did not have conversation with that l



      I did not have conversations with that lady,


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    3. Coen Brothers "Raising Arizona" Kenny Delmar was the voice of Foghorn Leghorn ( also Sen Claghorn on Fred Allen radio show BTW) the boss o' the barnyard

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  29. A question came up in my mind this AM. Do you think before his murder, Abel asked his parents why they were bringing up his brother?

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  30. Adam, Eve, Cain and Abel were such a brazen clan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A dysfunctional family, no doubt, but at least they were not concerned about keeping up with the Jones's.

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    2. ....which leads to the question: What was Adam and Eve's surname anyway? Curiously, the Bible makes no mention of it! My two possible candidates for their surname would be "Eve Nonavel" or "Adam Glabrousgut."

      LegoWhoIsCuriousToHearPossibleSurnameCandidatesFromFellowBlainesvillians

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    3. Sacco and Vanzetti? Loggins and Messina? Haldeman and Ehrlichman? Nichols and May?
      pjbReadAdamKnewItWasOverWhenEveSaid,"IThinkWeShouldSeeOtherPeople. "

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    4. That shrew, Eve, ran poor Adam around like she was the only woman on the planet.

      Delete
  31. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  32. I love a puzzle where it just comes to you upon reading it, so no consulting of lists is involved.
    pjbCan'tHelpButThinkOfWeirdAlYankovicNow

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  33. As I learned from all my friends at school:
    The best part of waking up is a little cold duck in your cup and the puzzle answer before the pleading to answer NPR's call.

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  34. First, I must admit the answer I came up with last week was WRONG!
    So my clues were useless. Sorry if that led anyone astray.
    However, this week I have the right answer. Trust me. So here's the clue:
    One of the two words has a homophone that means the exact opposite of the meaning of the first word.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry, the exact opposite meaning of the SECOND word.😁

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    2. WS. As there are four words involved in this puzzle (food 1, food 2, food 1 plus g, and food 2 rearranged) I believe your observation, while astute, would be better described as follows.

      One of the four words in this puzzle has a homonym whose meaning is it’s opposite.

      Delete
    3. Yeah, that's I meant. Yeah, that's the ticket!👍

      Delete
  35. Kippers for breakfast, Aunt Helga?

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  36. A couple of hints:

    1. Rearrange the breakfast item to get a country and a synonym for children (or a synonym for what you would need to solve the puzzle).

    2. One of the four words has been in the current news with some frequency.

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  37. Late to the party but got the answer. Siz's wording of the puzzle is much easier.

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  38. Think of a common two-word saying beginning with the second word of the old-fashioned activity. Then think of a homophone for the second word of this saying and add an R somewhere in the middle to name a technology that rendered the old-fashioned activity obsolete.

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  39. I've thought of a two-word phrase that Blaine would ZAP IMMEDIATELY!! Think of a certain number followed by the plural of a certain noun. I'm sure that all those who have solved this know exactly the phrase of which I'm thinking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That could be a two that is to too much a hint

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    2. I think I know the answer, that is if the plural noun was used in singular form by a well-known novelist, almost a century ago.

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    3. Yeah, I think almost all of us thought of that, and knew it would be too obvious. However, there is a very well disguised reference to that phrase elsewhere on this page. To the individual who wrote that, I will just say, well done!

      Delete
  40. It's cool your handle is also a clue.

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    Replies
    1. It's sure preferable to a few weeks ago when one guy's handle was an absolute giveaway!!

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    2. Mr. Sister in law lives on Lummi Island. BTW

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  41. I'll bet that A 600-pound Colorado elk will not be retiring any time soon.

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  42. What a run for Matt Amodio on Jeopardy! Glad to have witnessed his grace, poise, intelligence, and humility in those 39 games.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Replies
    1. My mom won't. She just didn't like him. I think it was the way he'd say "What is" when the answer was a person's name, which clearly requires a "Who is". Something minor like that.
      pjbWondersWhyHeCouldn'tMakeItAnEven40?AlmostSeemsLikeHeTookADiveToday

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  44. I share Cranberry's suspicions--he looked like Jake LaMotta taking a dive throughout, capped by that inexplicably wrong answer in Final Jeopardy. But I'm biased--like Mrs. Berry I just didn't like him (there's something disrespectful about using "what" when "who" is called for) and I was getting tired of one runaway after another.

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    Replies
    1. Kind of a facetious manner- as if he did not know an answer, but of course he did.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. I am so with you about the "what" instead of "who," and then never saying the full name, just the last name.

      (He facilitates weekly puzzles on NPR. They don't go on for too long. "What's Shortz?")

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    4. Matt Amodio followed all the rules of Jeopardy! during the confines of the game. He provided a question and just the last name unless more information was required in follow-up. He freed up his brain to come up with answers...and he never said "True Daily Double." Nothing extraneous and one of the keys to his success. It was fascinating to see him come up with 1305 correct questions.

      And soon, we'll be able to say "What's up, Doc?"

      "Wuuuut's Amodio?" Yes!

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  45. I think he took a dive too. Something did not seem right.

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  46. He did not see that upset at the end.Suspicious.

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    Replies
    1. I agree. Very suspicious. Also seems like he did not select bigger money questions as usually did.

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    2. As my wife says, everyone has a bad day at work.

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    3. Yes, it happens. Now Matt can get on with putting all his knowledge and training to solving bigger problems.

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    4. Finishing his dissertation and trying to land a tenure-track job?

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    5. Both. . .and more. I hope Colbert gets in touch.


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    6. I thought he was going to Disneyland.

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  47. It was pretty obvious from the first that this was going to be Matt's swan song.
    He seemed almost ill, maybe made so by the producer's (remember him?) decision that ratings would be better without him. Maybe someday we'll know.
    Even though I am a fan of the show, I don't like the sneaky ways they do things,
    It is amazing that no leak of the end of his reign (actually ended in August) seemed to get out.
    He certainly was not going to spread the word since he would have forfeited his winnings!
    I have never figured out what they hold over the audience members to keep them quiet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As a carmen cygni, it was not all that melodious (perhaps Amodious ;-)).

      This show was filmed 9-7-21, after an 11-day hiatus after filming 15 shows in 3 taping days. I'm going with tiredness, stress, and an off day. He also faced 2 strong opponents. (And Richards was gone by the start of this show.)

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    2. My last (wholly speculative) take on the subject (in installments because this site won't let me publish this as a single comment). Maybe he thought he had accomplished all he could, having passed Holzhauer's record for second place but knowing it was unlikely he would pass Jennings'. Or maybe he thought he had made enough money (no Bezos he) and decided to give someone else a shot. Or perhaps he was losing interest in these one-sided games (remember when Trump told his followers they would get tired of winning) and, since there is no way to retire as champion, let the other contestants beat him. Or maybe he found the fame that comes with being on tv every night for months on end to be too smothering (as Bialik said on last night's episode, "Welcome to fame"). These are all human motives, none of them dishonorable. Never having been in that position I don't know if I'd react the same way.

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    3. Forget the "installments" part--it accepted it after all.

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    4. I find this speculation and conspiracy-theory mongering tiresome. This is from The Washington Post:

      In a phone interview on Monday, Amodio said his final episode was taped in mid-September, when he showed up to set after a break of a couple of weeks. (The show films a week’s worth of episodes in one production day.) On his previous trip to the set, he reeled off 15 victories over three days, many of them decisive “runaways” in which he could not be caught entering Final Jeopardy! But this time he found he couldn’t settle back into the groove of filming yet, and he was still feeling a bit “disheveled” that early in the day.

      “I got off to an early good start, but Double Jeopardy! went terribly for me. I was pretty soundly defeated,” Amodio said. “It was weird because in previous games, there were stretches where I lost the timing of the buzzer, but it was early enough in the games where the dollar values weren’t so high that I could recover later. … It had never been that long a stretch during a crucial point of time in the game.”

      And even though Amodio still can’t quite wrap his mind around his level of “Jeopardy!” success, and emphasizes how grateful he is for everything, the loss still stung. (“I’m a bit of a perfectionist, in case you can’t tell,” he said and laughed.) Once he beat Holzhauer’s 32-game streak, the possibility began to form in his mind that maybe, just maybe, he could get to Jennings’s record.

      But then, suddenly, it was over. Before he left, the staff and crew joined for “a very nice moment” for his send-off, and guest host Mayim Bialik initiated a second round of applause with everyone to congratulate him on his victories. “I wasn’t feeling so great at the time, so reaching out to make me feel that way was very nice of her,” he said.

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    5. Genuine respect all around. Thanks for sharing the WP quote, jan.

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    6. Gee, jan, are you really willing to allow a conspiracy theory to go to waist? How unAmerikan!

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    7. As the positive body image people say, a waist is a terrible thing to mind.

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    8. I had a gut feeling you might post something like that.

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    9. Did you see the videos of that plane going in? I suspect he had a heart attack or crotch itch he couldn't get to.

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    10. I didn't realize there were so many Jeopardy experts here.
      So it is worthwhile to ask again how the studio audience is induced to keep quiet for a month about the end of a run that garnered lively newspaper and TV coverage.

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    11. They ask the audience to pinky-swear not to tell.

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    12. Sounds like a few people watched Quiz Show the night before, eh? (A great movie, even if every viewing does temporarily make me trigger-happy on crying game show conspiracy.)

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    13. I watched the quiz shows "Quiz Show" is about on our litte 10" urp-green Hoffamn when I was in high school.
      My mother had a friend who was the ultimate iconoclast and he prevented me from believing in them enough to do me harm when they disappointed.

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    14. Matt, and James before him, combined their prodigious memories with savvy, if somewhat predatory, betting and other strategies to give Jeopardy many weeks of marvel.

      What I realized last night after a week of a new champion and closer games is that it was much, much more enjoyable.
      Without really recognizing it, six weeks of deer-in-the-headlights challengers was wearing.
      Smiles, and even laughs, should be part of the game and I hope that a run of those has begun.

      Delete
  48. If an all girls law school had a bus to transport their students, would that be a miss carriage of justice?

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  49. More UPS drivers are killed by falling airplanes than any other delivery service.

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  50. jan,
    With your vast medical background, would you say a superior surgeon is a cut above the rest, or the other way around? Just asking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For questions about something like a surgeon, ask Enya_and_WeirdAl_fan.

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  51. he looked like a violent Reagan or so I've heard

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    Replies
    1. one of the California raisins looked ( to me at least )like RR

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  52. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  53. I've got it pumpkin carp
    and crap pumpking

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  54. I thought first on "egg" and something to do with 3G. Over easy? Nee. Ultimate outcome is old-fashioned? We all have our ways of doing things, according to our traditions. Answer I submitted is one of the most incredible scenes I've ever gotten to witness. And, they get served up a mighty fine breakfast and lunch, too. This Sunday, is, I believe, Lulu's last broadcast, that she will explore the personal side of opinion, on a NY Times podcast. Fascinating subject - what some consider old-fashioned is to others just a way of life.

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  55. WHAT'S ;-) RAISIN BRAN, BARN RAISING

    "Connections, connections, connections." >>> Barn raising is also know as a Bee raising in the UK. Bees make connections and barns may store cereal like BRAN.

    "Underwear" >>> Carter >>> Jimmy Carter >>> Carter is a champion of Habitat for Humanity, a somewhat comparable modern-day "barn" raising.

    "Happy anniversary! 10/10 -- a memorable date." Dates and RAISINs are both dried fruit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Daily Double: 😉
      — He facilitates weekly puzzles on NPR. They don't go on for too long.
      — What's Shortz?
      🤣🤣🤣

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  56. BARN RAISING <— RAISIN BRAN

    My anagrammatic hint: “Rearrange the breakfast item to get a country and a synonym for children (or a synonym for what you would need to solve the puzzle).” —> Iran and bairns (or brains—though perhaps “brains” is not so much a synonym as a metaphor—and hence the hints also by Rob, Bobby, bird, etc.)

    The word in the “current news” I hinted at was “raising,” i.e., “raising the debt ceiling.”

    And “current,” of course, is a homophone of “currant,” which suggests “raisin,” both of which are made from grapes, though different varieties.

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  57. RAISIN BRAN => BARN RAISING

    Before I solved it, I saw Ron's comment about how there were two stories on NPR that morning, and thought nothing of it. It just looked like a comment about what else was on the radio. It was only after I had solved the puzzle that I realized it was a reference to Two Scoops, and the old Kellog's Raisin Bran ads.

    Ron, even though Blaine eventually removed your comment, I thought it was excellent, and you get a gold star from me!

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  58. Raisin Bran/Barn Raising

    My post about reading the headlines was a reference to newspaper headlines are often the results of a reporter’s scoop. Kellogg’s Raisin Bran was advertised as having, “Two scoops of rai-sins….”

    Multiple other posts allude to the same advertising campaign, including Jan’s (Trump’s ice cream) which recall’s Trump always wanting 2 scoops while everyone else was served one.

    Personally, I think Trump ice cream would be tasteless, and have too much fat.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Our friend geofan has concocted a half-dozen dazzling WolrdPlay puzzles that will appear on this week's Puzzleria!... uploaded early Friday morn, just after midnight Pacific Daylight Time.
    Also on our menu:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week that involves an "alphabetical string bean,"
    * a puzzle slice that will require earplugs to solve,
    * a nice and spicy Dessert, and
    * eight puzzling barn burners that riff off this week's NPR offering.
    Drop on by for some fun.

    LegoPurveyorOfGeofantasticPuzzles

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  60. Raisin Bran --> barn raising

    Last Sunday I said, “I am reminded of Michael Caine.” Think “raising cain.” Think “barn raising.”

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  61. RAISIN BRAN — BARN RAISING

    My post above, "I feel like going bowling," was an oblique reference to the movie Kingpin, which has a barn-raising scene in it. (Since the reference to the one in Witness was already taken.)

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  62. RAISIN BRAN -> BARN RAISING

    > Another Icelandic connection!

    BARN RAISING anagrams to "Ásbirningar", a clan that was apparently a big deal in Iceland in the 12th and 13th centuries.

    >> Do you think before his murder, Abel asked his parents why they were bringing up his brother?
    > You mean, instead of growing sugar?

    RAISING cane.

    > Trump's ice cream.

    Two scoops, like the raisins in RAISIN BRAN.

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  63. I wrote, “Take the breakfast. Remove all repeated letters. You are left with something used in making ancient cosmetics.” That’s Sb, antimony, which was powdered and used as eye makeup (kohl) by the ancient Egyptians.

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    Replies
    1. I interpreted your comments as leading to BS, which is a term for bull manure, which was also used in ancient cosmetics, according to google!

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    2. I got "brains" by deleting just the repetitions, and "bs" by deleting them all, and both led me to the observation "yuck." I didn't think of antimony. I guess almost any substance might have been used by someone, somehow, at some time, as a cosmetic!

      Delete
  64. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  65. With thanks and a whole lot of sorrow,
    on Sunday, two days from tomorrow,
    we must all bid "adieu"
    to the Queen of the Clue,
    Ms. Lulu Garcia Navarro

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! Shall we raise a lime rickey in her honor?

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    2. Mister Lear is envious of your five-line tribute, Mister Re. As am I.

      LegoLuLuLiker



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    3. Be sure to toss Three Coins in Lake Lugano should you happen by.

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  66. My comment: “My only post this week is to say you don’t need an MBA to solve this one.” Was referencing the popular brands of Raisin Bran, such as “post” and “Kellogg” (re MBA).

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  67. My clue was "Activity handed me the key." Once I saw that it was an activity I safely assumed that I needed to add a g to a word that ended in "in" that could be a verb.

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  68. "One cuts through wood, while the other cuts through water. You can cut the third with a bridge. See?"

    Harrison Ford ("cuts through water") worked as a carpenter ("cuts through wood") before his movie career took off. He played John Book ("abridge" = "cut") in "Witness" ("See?"), where he showed off his carpentry skills by building that wooden toy for the young boy played by Lukas Haas.

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  69. I submitted RAISIN BRAN -> BARN RAISING

    I took issue with Ron's comment take the breakfast. Remove all repeated letters. You are left with something used in making ancient cosmetics.

    I assume Rob was talking about ancient Egypt's use of Stibnite as eyeshade. This confirmed my answer of Raisin Bran, since you remove the repeated letters and you get sb, which is much like the chemical symbol for Antimony (Sb)

    It's a slick clue, so thank you Ron! But as a resident Chemist of Blainesville, I must note that Ancient Eyeshade was actually Stibnite, which is Antimony Sulfide, technically Sb2S3. And you can't get either SbS or SbSbSSS by removing double letters.

    Which is why I mentioned ceramics, which actually had Antimony in them.

    ReplyDelete
  70. RAISIN BRANBARN RAISING

    Unable to post earlier...

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  71. I couldn't post earlier either... RAISIN BRAN>>>>>>>BARN RAISING. Yay for me!!??!?

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  72. I didn't post a hint this week, but considered: Lorraine Hansberry, but thought it might be TMI. She wrote the play, A Raisin in the Sun, that debuted on Broadway in 1959.

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  73. RAISIN BRAN, BARN RAISING
    My mention of "Weird Al" referred to his parody of "Gangsta's Paradise", "Amish Paradise".
    pjbSaysEvenEzekielThinksThatHisMindIsGone

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  74. My comment: I hope my answer is good enough.
    Alexander Godunov was one of the stars of Witness, which as others have mentioned, contained a scene of a barn raising.

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  75. UPDATE:

    One of three zebras on the loose in the Washington, D.C. area has died. It was found in an illegal snare trap on private property.

    This is very disturbing as it indicates a one hundred percent increase in zebra deaths in Washington D.C. due to illegal zebra trapping.

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  76. I just now was quickly going through our mayor's weekly propaganda email and saw a large photo of someone holding a huge pumpkin with black stick-on plastic eyes and mouth. I had not seen this before. The pumpkin had not been in any way forced to endure any invasive procedure, it was just as it came from the supermarket, or do they still grow them in farms? I wish I could upload the photo for you all to see. What a joy this must be for the little monsters who no longer have to go through all the drudgery and hassle of cutting and eviscerating in order to have a jack-0-lantern. Of course it must be awful for the mothers to have to give up cleaning up after their kids. Oh well, I guess we can't all be winners. Now, how can they get hens to lay decorated hard boiled eggs?

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  77. By cooking them whole while making chicken soup!

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  78. PS Oh, I forgot. Make sure to have dye in the pot. My Mom always did that even though we'd celebrate Passover, not Easter

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  79. 200th post this week. Remember to click on "Load more" at the bottom of the page.

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