Sunday, November 13, 2022

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 13, 2022): A Pair of Companies

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 13, 2022): A Pair of Companies
Q: Think of two well-known companies with two-syllable names starting with J and D, respectively and whose names rhyme. One of these companies was founded in the last 10 years. What companies are these?
I calculate 44 years between the founding of the two companies. Anyone notice a connection to last week's puzzle?

Edit: The first company was founded in 1969 and the second in 2013. The callback to last week's puzzle was punctuation — a dash.
A: JORDACHE and DOORDASH

173 comments:

  1. DebtBlue sounds like a terrible Elon Musk idea.

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    1. If that's not TMI, there goes my answer.

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    2. I don't know how well it qualifies in the well known department, but there is a company with that name.

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    3. Disney and...oh, never mind.

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    4. jsulbyrne, thanks for introducing us to part of the world of birding. . .Right?

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    5. ^^^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jizz_(birding)

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  2. I have the stupid answer already.

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  3. The answer I have so far—not the intended answer, I am sure—"exceeds" the puzzle in one way but doesn't quite satisfy in another way.

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  4. Ok, nix on my previous answer. (One of the companies was defunct.) But I've got it now. If I could only come up with a hint...

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    1. Jetson (founded 20120, Datsun (defunct) ?

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    2. No. J. Crew and Daewoo (defunct).

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    3. And neither one satisfied the within-the-last-10-years criterion.

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  5. Replies
    1. Come the Thursday deadline, I'll be very interested in your explanation as to how anyone who has solved the puzzle could possibly recognize any connection whatsoever with your clue and either of the two companies.

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  6. I don't think Ayesha specified the exact number of correct submissions this week.

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    1. She said nothing other than it was difficult for listeners.

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  7. The last four letters of the first company name describe what might happen due to excessive use of the second company's offerings.

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  8. Take the two syllables. Replace the starting sound of each with the same two letters. You get synonyms.

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. An early promotional gimmick failed spectacularly 43 years after a similar incident in the same city.

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  11. Pretty sure I had the right answer but had to double check with the Mrs.

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  12. I thought I had the answer, but checked the pronunciation, and the two companies don't quite rhyme. Still looking

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    1. Minutes later, I smacked my head, when I stumbled across the answer on an object in my house.

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  13. Anagram the common letters to get a sitcom.

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  14. I had one of the companies right almost immediately. A Google search, where I did little besides replacing that company's first letter with the other first letter named in the puzzle, led me to the other company right away. Done!

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  15. This puzzle is highly unsatisfying.

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    Replies
    1. I agree. You might enjoy reading what I posted earlier today at the very end of last week's blog.

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  16. Before I say anything about this week’s puzzle, a footnote about last week’s. In all my years of listening to and participating in the Sunday Puzzle, I do not recall a single instance when the number of correct submissions (or the number of all submissions) was so low that they wouldn’t even announce it on the air. Such was last week’s puzzle. I’m sure that the second sentence of the puzzle was definitely not written by an English major.

    As for this week’s puzzle, one can easily use both companies simultaneously.

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    Replies
    1. You are right, Chuck.
      As I have suggested before, the reported number of submissions (correct or otherwise) seems to be generated by a device similar to the one used by Pat and Vanna.
      It is a decades long tradition.
      Too bad it got left out this week.

      Might as well stick my opinion of this week's "challenge" here: Phooey,

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  17. I think I have the answer, but I have never heard of either of these two "well known" companies!

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  18. A fitting puzzle this week. Here’s saluting all our armed services who protect us day and night.

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  19. I've got 2 names but I'm still up in the air about my answer.

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  20. The older company had some really wild television commercials back in the 80s. Look them up on YouTube if you've forgotten.

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  21. Replace the last 3 letters of the J company with 1 letter to get a person's name.

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  22. Good morning! One of the companies we use -- especially when the mercury goes down!

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  23. Didn't take long to guess the answer

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  24. Blaine's clues are getting a bit easier to figure out.

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  25. Well I thought of the "J" company but could only then infer the "D". It exists but I don't know if I have the right answer.

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  26. What does the puzzle wording mean by J and D respectively? I started with D and then thought of J.

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    1. Natasha, good point. "Respectively" is not needed.

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    2. I means nothing at all. Just another example of poor wording.

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    3. My guess is they phrased it that way in an attempt to clarify that it is the company names that start with J and D, and not the two syllables. Could be better phrasing either way, but I expect most people will infer that it is the company names, because of the rhyming requirement.

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    4. Thanks for replying. They need to hire an intern who can recognize grammatical errors, I think.

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    5. Some of NPR's on air employees cannot even understand the either or vs. neither nor rule. I think you may be asking just a bit too much, Natasha.

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    6. Perhaps I am too critical. Expectations are lower these days. I see lots of grammatical errors at the college. Takes a lot of time to grade papers and point them all out! LOL.

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    7. Ah, Natasha, I remember it well. I think I still suffer from PTSD--Post Traumatic Syntax Disorder. I wish you the best.

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    8. But, as Dr. Bock (George C. Scott’s character) said in The Hospital, “Somebody’s got to be responsible.”

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    9. He also said, "We cure nothing! We heal nothing!"

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    10. My students are going to be saving lives hopefully some day...nurses and med. assistants.

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    11. No one saves lives. Best you can do is delay death.

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    12. The news commentators need English classes. It hurts my ears to listen to them.

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    13. Yes, they are awful to listen too. They have no idea how singulars and plurals are supposed to compliment each other. Another thing that drives me mad is a couple of their hosts apparently are from Australia and have a very low class accent and cannot pronounce the letter R. It is so distracting. Another distraction is some programs run background notes while they are talking. I say notes, and not music, because it is not music to me and I do not want to hear it. I have begun to turn these programs off more now because they are so awful to listen to.

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    14. I cannot stand any of the music.

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    15. Imagine attending a lecture, perhaps a professor speaking, and music is playing in the background.

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    16. Which news station has music in the background?

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  27. Here is a puzzle I coined and offered to Will Shortz last week. He laughed and said it is cute, but does not think he can use it on NPR. Please tell me what you think, if you can solve it.

    What’s the difference between an unnamed authority and a zebra?

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    1. One's a clandestine source, the other's a candycane horse?

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    2. Cigar? Like a Cuban cigar? Havana source vs. savannah horse?

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    3. Source who's undercover vs. horse of another color?

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    4. No, but you seem to be on the right track.

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    5. hyped source vs. striped horse?

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    6. Closest one yet, but not the answer.

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    7. anonymous source and dichotamous horse?

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    8. Often cited with the news and often sighted with the gnus?

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    9. Unnamed source and unmaned horse? Spoofed source and hoofed horse?

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    10. Lancek,
      I love your clever answer. It may be even better than mine.

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    11. Tortitude,
      You are on the right track.

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    12. How about a Striped Horse and a Hyped Source?

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    13. SuperZee,
      That is the closest one yet, but maybe you guys are overthinking this a bit.

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    14. Guessing that Striped Horse is correct, then we're looking at some variant of an Unnamed Source.
      Perhaps his/her identity was Hidden, Wiped or the information was Typed...

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    15. Striped Horse and Secret Source?

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    16. Not black & white vs black & white...

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    17. No, it is on the track of SuperZee's tries, but I think you guys are overthinking it a bit.

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    18. I have another poser along the lines of sdb's. Don't overthink it:
      I'm thinking of a number between one and ten. What is it.

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    19. Oh, no, SDB, that's much too big.
      I bet it's π. Is it?? Is it bigger?? Is it π squared??
      Am I at least close???

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  28. I'm not fond of this one, because (i) I don't love the puzzles that are all about brand names, and (ii) there are many answers if you don't take "well-known" too seriously.
    But, I'm sure I now have the intended answer, and I *do* find it somewhat satisfying, and best of all I understand Blaine's hint! So not a total loss.

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    1. Agree with all of your points. At least the pronunciation works this time.

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  29. In great brand mashups, the pony express

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  30. Cartoon in this week's New Yorker: The scene is a hospital emergency room after an unsuccessful resuscitation attempt. A body lies on a gurney, surrounded by three gowned medical people. One removes his mask and says, "Time of death: 7:31 p.m. Which means we missed 'Jeopardy!' for nothing."

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    1. However, there is always youtube.

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    2. Hey, it's the Tournament of Champions, and it's been very exciting so far! But don't these medical people have DVRs?

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    3. Must be an old cartoon. "Intern" must have selected it.

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    4. Nope. The cartoonist, Asher Perlman, has only been drawing for The New Yorker since last year.

      I must say, this kind of dissection produces almost as pretty a result on cartoons as it does in a morgue.

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    5. Anyway, given how hard the Final Jeopardy! was for last week's Special Exhibition game between Amy, Matt, and Mattea, I'm surprised how easy tonight's is for the first Final match:

      GEOGRA-FLEE

      IN JULY 2022 THE OUSTED PRESIDENT OF THIS COUNTRY FLED WEST ACROSS THE INDIAN OCEAN TO THE MALDIVES

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    6. Agreed. As the sedimentologist flumed, gotta keep up on current events...

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    7. Weird how all three finalists live within 100 miles of each other.

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    8. And why does Ken call this a "best of seven" series? If it were, one player could win the first 3 games, and another would have the chance to win 4.

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    9. You know, Jan, Ken's just not all that bright...

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    10. It is a strange lapse. It is too late for him to fix unless they caught it however long ago this was taped.
      I think they will emphasize "the first to three wins" today.
      Jan: Do you play the game "live" or peek at answers?
      I think I have peeked twice in the thousands of games I've watched.

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    11. I've peaked lots of times, but never watched the show.

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    12. Major controversy in today's Final Jeopardy.

      What would your question be for:

      "Paul’s letter to them is the New Testament epistle with the most Old Testament quotations."

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    13. My answer would be "Damned if I know." though I have a guess.
      I just finished figuring why I didn't know yesterday's FJ. Too early to work on today's.
      I'm not too big on worrying about J before its been on (like 7 this evening). See "peeking" above.

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    14. Even I know what that question would be, and I am not religious, nor have I read the bible.

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    15. Didn't get the FJ answer and also heard nothing about the controversy.
      More info, WW?

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    16. MJ, you can read more here:

      https://thejeopardyfan.com/2022/11/final-jeopardy-11-16-2022.html

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    17. Thanks. It was a lame clue.
      Kind of looks like he will win, uh I mean He, but am still rooting for her.

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  31. Combine both company names and rearrange to get a specific type of farm, an adjective that might describe a world-weary person, and a neighborhood name found in more than one major city.

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  32. Rained so much that the brooke changed course after all this time.

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    1. Cute. But you're thinking of the wrong company.

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    2. I got the clue. I must have the same answer as TomR.

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    3. Jan, how do you know what I am thinking? Half the time, I don't even know what I'm thinking.

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    4. Fair enough. But, to avoid giving too much away, I'll stay Silent.

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  33. I spent far too much time searching lists - to no avail. Then, just before 3AM this morning the answer suddenly came to me. Go figure.

    I'd guess that one company has a broader potential market than the other.

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  34. Come Thursday, I hope you'll be able to post two links, one to the SNL skit for each company.

    Note: The best way to post links:
    <A href=&quote;(URL for the link)&quote;>(NAME for the link)</A>

    (And here's one more time I would really appreciate the prevue option we used to have!)

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  35. Let's try this:

    <A href=""""(URL for the link)"""">(NAME for the link)</A>

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  36. *SIGH!* Well, make those quadruple quotes ("""") into single quotes (") and you've got it.

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  37. SNL Hint (from back when SNL was funny): The Coneheads

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    1. Ben, I don't think it is funny to make fun of people with pointy heads.

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    2. Yes indeed. I solved it in a flash. But i did not know a word can also be a syllable?

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    3. This must be a record for savvy Steve right? How many now on the blog.Congrats.

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    4. You could probably also use "Land Shark"?

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  38. Somewhat surprised that I (eye, aye) and to (two,too) were not caught in the on-air synonym challenge.

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  39. Tomorrow is the last day of the Sharm el-Sheikh Climate Change Conference. Time is running out on the time clock for their clime talk.

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  40. Every time I get into a conversation with a conservative they will try to embarrass me. It happened again yesterday when this guy challenged me to name the three branches of government.

    I said, "That's easy. There's:
    Branch DuBois and
    Brush Limb Bough and
    Ivy Needles."

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  41. JORDACHEDOORDASH (founded January, 2013)

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  42. DoorDash, Jordache

    Hint: “TX.” “TX” are the initials of DoorDash CEO Tony Xu.

    The first answer I came up with was Daewoo and J. Crew, but it failed on two criteria: Daewoo is defunct, and neither company was founded in the last 10 years.

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  43. b>Jordache/Door Dash

    My comment that one company serves broader potential market than the other was based on Jordache only making women’s clothing.

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  44. RIP Robert Clary, a real concentration camp survivor, and Cpl. LeBeau on Hogan's Heroes.

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  45. JORDACHE, DOORDASH

    >An early promotional gimmick failed spectacularly 43 years after a similar incident in the same city.

    The Jordache Blimp crashed in Lakewood, NJ, 43 years after the Hindenburg.

    > Anagram the common letters to get a sitcom.

    Rhoda

    > Both companies have been spoofed on SNL.

    Gilda Radner danced in Jewess Jeans (the Jordache founders were Israelis), and "Chuck Schumer" called for a sandwich while under siege on 1/6.

    >> Rained so much that the brooke changed course after all this time.
    > Cute. But you're thinking of the wrong company. But, to avoid giving too much away, I'll stay Silent.

    Like Silent Cal Coolidge, who only wore Calvin's. (Brooke Shields did ads for Calvin Klein, not Jordache.)

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    Replies
    1. While remembered for her, "Nothing comes between me and my Calvins," ad, Brookle has recently done a series of ads for Jordache...

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    2. Jan - as Super Zee noted, Brooke is now doing ads for Jordache. Apology accepted.

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    3. OK, sure, but now she's selling mom jeans. Seriously, was anyone else ticked off by her ATC interview with Mary Louise Kelly in May (re-aired in September)? I mean, she had a dominant career in modeling, where the whole point is exemplifying and exploiting society's standards for youth and beauty, and then she complains when her career isn't what it once was because she no longer meets those standards.

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  46. JORDACHE, DOORDASH

    One of the names was on an object in my house. It turns out that a friend that drives for Doordash left a Doordash insulated pizza bag in my front closet. Once I spotted that, the solution was easy.

    I also googled, and found out that there is a company called DebtBlue, which clearly rhymes with Jet Blue. The About Us section of their webpage said they are in business in over 40 states, which is arguably "well known," but it does not give a year of founding, so I did not confirm if they are less than 10 years old.

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  47. JORDACHE, DOORDASH. My hint was that the last four letters of the first company’s name describe what might happen due to excessive use of the second company’s offerings.

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  48. JORDACHE, DOORDASH

    "GOTcha" refers to Game of Thrones and Winter is Coming. Of course, winter is a time you can be DASHing through the Snow.

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  49. Jordache, DoorDash

    Last Sunday I said, “one can easily use both companies simultaneously.” Eat DoorDash-delivered food while wearing your Jordache jeans.”

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  50. "Puzzle Fun by Bobby Jacobs" is our featured menu item on this week's Puzzleria! Bobby, who is a math whiz, "word whiz" and "quiz whiz," is sharing his Alphanumeric Appetizer with us, titled “Numbers that add up to themselves.”
    We upload Puzzleria! every early Friday just after midnight Pacific Standard Time.
    Also on our menus:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week that asks you to find an oxymoron with two words that begin with the same four letters,
    * an Amphibious Puzzle Slice about "walking and waltzing underwater,"
    * a "Surgical Dessert" that revisits a 19-century medical breakthrough, and
    * 11 riff-offs of this week's DoorDash & Jordache haberdashery, including two created by our friend Plantsmith.
    Why not stop on by for a slice of Bobby's second-to-none Puzzle Fun?

    LegoWhoIsUnlikeBobbyNoTAMathWhizWordWhizOrQuizWhizButMoreOfACheese(Head)Whiz

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  51. Jordache — DoorDash

    The ideas behind my posts:

    The answer I have so far—not the intended answer, I am sure—"exceeds" the puzzle in one way but doesn't quite satisfy in another way.
    DoorDash came to mind pretty much right away, and then I came across Juul Labs. As an answer, it "exceeded" the puzzle in that those were both companies started in the past ten years, but it didn't satisfy in that they don't really rhyme.

    A Google search, where I did little besides replacing that company's first letter with the other first letter named in the puzzle, led me to the other company right away.
    Having thought of DoorDash, I googled "Jordash," and what do you know—"Jordache" shows up right away.

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    Replies
    1. By the way, thank you, Tommy Boy, for confirming I had DoorDash right! 😁

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  52. Jordache — DoorDash. My clue was The Coneheads, because they pretend they are "from France" -- and Jordache also seemed "fake French" when it debuted in the 1970s. And one other "clue" that I've forgotten since I solved it.

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  53. What’s the difference between an unnamed authority and a zebra?

    Answer: One is an anonymous source and the other is a synonymous horse.

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  54. JORDACHE, DOORDASH
    I started out consulting a list of company names beginning with J, and didn't find the former. When I went to a list of D names, the latter jumped right out at me. I then realized I should've known this one without the lists, as the first time I had ever heard of DOORDASH, I immediately noticed its name rhymes with JORDACHE. Never thought it would actually be the subject of a challenge, but hey, never say never.
    pjbMustComplimentSDBOnHisUniqueSpoonerism:"WoodGun!FlopTight!BardToHeatThatOne!"

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  55. Why is it almost olfactory workers smell?

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  56. If King Charles III wants to contact his youngest son who has bolted, does this require a mail Harry pass?

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    1. Only 2 that we know of. I suspect that is an accurate count because I doubt Chuck is sexually attracted to women. And, remember the son never sets on the British umpire.

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  57. My clues - “a fitting puzzle”….and the shout out to the armed services who protect us “day and night” was an effort to throw folks off the trail around Veterans Day. But they were referring to Jordache’s jingle….”day or night, Jordache has the fit that’s right….the Jordache look”.

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  58. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from Henri Picciotto, of Berkeley, Calif. He coedits the weekly "Out of Left Field" cryptic crossword. Name a branch of scientific study. Drop the last letter. Then rearrange the remaining letters to name two subjects of that study. What branch of science is it?

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  59. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  60. Google is seldom of any help to me when trying to decipher WW's clues.

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  61. I was about to put it aside for the moment, when it dawned on me.

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