Sunday, June 16, 2024

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 16, 2024): Mixed-up Body Parts

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 16, 2024): Mixed-up Body Parts
Q: Think of two parts of the human body that start with the same letter of the alphabet. Drop one instance of that letter and rearrange the remaining letters to name another part of the body that is not near the other two. What are the body parts?
For Father's Day, [REDACTED]

Edit: Before I removed my hint, it was that I was having a Spanish meal with a cup of tea. PAELLA + T = PATELLA
A: NAPE, NECK --> KNEECAP (very similar to a puzzle from Apr 2021)

86 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. I'm sure we've seen some variation of this wordplay before. Blaine's hint confirms this.

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  2. Rearrange the odd letters of the third word. You get something a bird does.

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  3. Coincidentally, on my b-ball shoot-around, I had some trouble in the area of the 3rd word.

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  4. I got an answer quickly. I'm not very confident that it's the intended one. But... we did get essentially this very same puzzle, with essentially my answer, not very long ago. A few years.

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  5. Oh, my answer is Rob's answer.
    Okay now I'm more confident it's the intended one!

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  7. Happy Father's Day to all you Dads. Hope you don't get too many ties this year!

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    1. As a father and an atheist, I'm appreciating the irony of Father's Day coinciding with Eid al-Adha, which for Jews and Christians is the Sacrifice of Abraham, celebrating the willingness of the Patriarch to obey a supernatural voice telling him to murder his son.

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    2. Jan's a Freethinker! Who knew.

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    3. Old School Father's Days gift -->"ties" --> NECKties

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  8. I think I remember this one, too--and I'm not a puzzle devotee (although I played on-air in 1998 during the postcard era). The intern should be charged with checking puzzle originality in addition to updating (correctly or incorrectly, promptly or tardily) the website. Then he/she could add "quality control" to the resume.

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  9. The way this puzzle is worded makes it harder to solve than the last time.

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    1. So you're saying it's a repeated puzzle? Hmm. Off to the Googles!

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    2. If I have the right answer, the first two body parts seem like a bit of a cheat.

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  10. For once, I understand Blaine's hint. I'm going to have a little chopped liver.

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  11. Applying this puzzle to animals, we have
    POODLE + PRAWNS - P => SNOWLEOPARD
    But, how about common animals all in the singular?

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  12. It's an appropriate puzzle for Father's Day. Happy Father's Day to the dads among us, especially Clark a pseudonym.

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  13. I wonder why same puzzle needs to be used. Lots of other puzzles around.

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  14. This puzzle has been used before. It is also an alternate solution to another puzzle.

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    1. There was a kneecap->neck, nape puzzle on April 11, 2021. Kneecap, necknape was another answer to the eardrum, underarm puzzle on May 7, 2023.

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  15. Are we all going to be disqualified for submitting the same answer twice this time?

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    1. Do you mean for submitting both times the puzzle was given? Worded differently and answer in different order this time.

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  16. All that came to me is HAIRS (H)EAD = AIRHEADS

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    1. I have an answer that works but I do not see the connection to Fathers' Day...

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    2. That connection should be clear on Thursday. Hopefully, not sooner ;-).

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  17. I landed in the Rob and Crito camp. But I submitted the wrong answer last week so who knows?

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  18. I think Blaine removed the other time the question was asked. However, not banished from internet.

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  19. Take 3 letters from one of the first two body parts and 1 from the second, rearrange, and get something celebrants today may be getting.

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  20. this puzzle was done before a few years ago

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    1. It was similar, but much easier. The previous puzzle gave the number of letters in what today is the third body part, and also gave the letter that must be added to that body part before anagramming to get the other two body parts. All you had to do was find a list of body part names of the given length, add the given letter, and examine the 2-word anagrams to find a pair of body parts. If not for a few giveaway hints here, today's would be a much tougher solve.

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    2. NPR got over 800 correct entries last time. I'm guessing fewer than half that this week.

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    3. To quote Homer Simpson when Krusty the Clown vowed to personally spit on every 50th Krusty Burger: "I like those odds!"

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    4. same words just different order but yeah I expect a lot to get this one even without the history

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  21. Yeah, deja vu on this one—I might have preferred a replacement!

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    1. Dr. Awkward: I thought your use of the word “replacement” could be TMI, but I felt that any comment would draw too much attention to the post.

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    2. Fair enough! It was not my subtlest moment, and the fact that I'm currently rehabbing my knee probably brought the topic to mind too quickly.

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  22. Replacement: Think of two well-known animal names that start with the same letter of the alphabet. Drop one instance of that letter and rearrange the remaining letters to name a third animal, which isn't related to the first two. All words are in the singular. What are the animals?

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    1. Rudolfo, I came up an answer, but I'm not sure it's the answer you're looking for. May I share it? Incidentally, I also came up with 3 funny answers (I'll let you work out the third thing each yields): bear/bull, cat/cobra, gnu/goat.

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    2. Go for it! I might need to tune my computer later ...

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    3. Ok, here goes: SEAL + SLUG -S --> SEAGULL.

      I'm not sure about this answer because it does seem to me that "seagull" is somewhat related to "seal."

      Another answer?

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    4. That was my answer, congratulations! And it's only Tuesday ...

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  23. Originally, I wondered if the wording implied that the two parts starting with the same letter were close together. I'm not wondering anymore.

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    1. One might argue that the two body parts starting with the same letter are analogous to a finger and a knuckle, or a foot and a toe.

      LegoFootInHisMouth?

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    2. Or to foot and sole? It's really too bad that ethereal isn't a body part. Heart and heel make such a poetic combination.

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    3. 1) Lego and C'n'D gave away a little more than I intended to, but that's OK
      2) I kind of got to it by way of PATE and PATELLA and only then began to vaguely recall the previous incarnation of this puzzle
      3) "Far apart" is relative. I don't think any two parts of my body have ever been more than seven feet apart.
      4) Even more amusing, IMO, than finger/knuckle, foot/toe, foot/sole, foot/arch, ear/lobe, hand/palm, eye/retina, etc., etc., etc. are questions like "what happens to your fist when you open your hand?" or "where does your lap go when you stand up?"

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  24. Am I the only one who noticed that the on-air puzzle contestant who was naming state capitals said Frankfart instead of Frankfurt?

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    1. Ooh, my 5-year old granddaughter would like that. She says she's the Queen of Bathroom Words, a title I think was probably bestowed by a disapproving grownup. Booty Butt and Diaper Onions are among her favorite epithets, but she's just warming up.

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    2. That's funny Jan. I just went back to listen to that segment to make sure I heard it right, and it's just as clear as rented beer!

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    3. Scarlett, glad you brought up Frankfart! I noticed that too. May all our farts be frank. And I like the expression "as clear as rented beer." That was new to me.

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    4. Thanks WW. My 'scholarly' husband just made that up, and I ran with it. Feel free to use it. I think it's clever. Kudos to hubby!!

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    5. Instead of Frankfort? No, I didn't hear it.

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    6. Yeah, I heard the Frankfart pronunciation, too

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    7. Scarlett - you made me laugh with the comment about rented beer

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    8. Glad you got a chuckle, Curtis. I was trying to think of a nice way of saying beer pi- - and my husband came up with that on the spot.

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    9. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12m5y0hHPM4

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  26. Only the cool cats know how long ago the similar puzzle aired

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    1. Or folks that can use Google. I found it in a minute or two.

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  27. I think the main reason that last week's puzzle had so few correct answers (64) is that the puzzle was wide open to alternate interpretations of the trick involved. This would have led many to submit unaccepted answers (like GUIDE or DOUGH CUTTER) with apparent confidence that they were correct. I'm still surprised that Will ignored them completely. This week's puzzle, having already been vetted, should not have that problem. I'll predict over 500.

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  28. NAPE, NECK; KNEECAP

    "It's an appropriate puzzle for Father's Day. Happy Father's Day to the dads among us, especially Clark a pseudonym." This had two clues >>> PAtella for KNEECAP and Clark's screen name abbreviates to Cap, as in KNEECAP. I believe Dr. K was also pointing at Cap.

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  29. NAPE + NECK (-N) = KNEECAP (Patella)

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  30. NAPE + NECK -N —> KNEECAP

    Hint: “Clark…this one’s for you.” —> (KNEE)CAP

    Hint: “Take 3 letters from one of the first two body parts and 1 from the second, rearrange, and get something celebrants today [i.e., Father’s Day] may be getting.”
    ECK + A —> CAKE

    Anyone heard from Cap?

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  31. nape, neck --> kneecap

    Last Sunday I said, “I think we've had something like this before. At least, part of it sounds familiar to me.” This was essentially the same puzzle that was used on April 11, 2021, and as the first poster this time, I was able to look it up before Blaine deleted it.

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  32. NAPE + NECK - N -> KNEECAP

    > For once, I understand Blaine's hint. I'm going to have a little chopped liver.

    Blaine said he was going to have a Spanish dish and a cup of tea. I'm not having pâté, just a little PATELLA.

    > The way this puzzle is worded makes it harder to solve than the last time.

    On April 11, 2021, just three years ago. This should have sounded familiar to the NPR puzzle crew!

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    1. Enjoy your little bite ... but a swallow cannot make it summer.

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  33. You've heard of pennies from heaven? Well, what about some “puzzles” from the heavens!
    Mark Scott (also known as "skydiveboy") is “parachuting” down to Puzzleria! with a trio of historically didactic (that is, “enlightening and instructional”) and “Skydiverting” puzzles that do not depend on wordplay or humor.
    They involve:
    * Ulysses S. Grant’s perhaps too-migratory and too-meandering post-presidential world tours,
    * George Armstrong Custer’s Past, Last Stand, and “tanking” ranks, and
    * a famous American general who sported comfortable mufti and rode sidesaddle on his mount.
    We upload Puzzleria! on Thursday, sometime between now and Midnight PDT.
    Also on our Menus this week:
    ~a Schpuzzle of the Week titled “Creatures all, great and small,”
    ~an Oval Office Hors d’Oeuvre titled Presidential “Briefing,”
    ~a Homophonic Synonymous Slice titled “Royalty, Deity and Papacy,”
    ~a Departmental Dessert titled “Supermarket Sloganeering,” and
    ~ten Riffing Off Shortz And Rai Slices titled “Kneecap & nape of the neck,” (including six riffs created by Nodd and one created by Plantsmith).
    That adds up to seventeen heavenly puzzles!

    Lego(AlsoKnownAs“TheMarquisDeSideSaddle!”)

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  34. I wrote, “Rearrange the odd letters of the third word. You get something a bird does.” That’s PECK.

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  35. NAPE & NECK -N = KNEECAP (Just as it was April 2021)

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  36. NECK, NAPE, KNEECAP. My hint: “Liz Powel knows the answer.” (Elizabeth Willing Powel is said to be the person who asked Benjamin Franklin after the Constitutional Convention, "What have we got, a republic or a monarchy?" Franklin reportedly replied, "A republic ... if you can keep it." The phrase “can keep” anagrams to “kneecap.”)

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  37. NECK+NAPE-N=KNEECAP
    pjbMayBePat,ButHeDoesn'tKnowAnyElla

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  38. No way Abraham would have believed he was to murder his son. He had just been told he'd be the father of a multitude, and Ishmael was out of the picture.

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    1. Of course, per the Koran, it was Ishmael who was saved from sacrifice.

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  39. Nonetheless, Isaac never spoke to him again. Who could blame him?

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  40. This week's challenge comes from listener Laura Kozma, of South River, N.J. Name a famous film actor of the past (4,6). Swap the second and third letters of the first name to name a color. Change the third letter of the last name to get another color. What actor is it?

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    1. The date on the page is given as June 30 (a week from today), so at first I wondered if they were ahead of themselves, but then they correctly referred to the kneecap challenge as "last week's challenge."

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    2. Easy. Waiting for Blaine...

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  41. Isn't Laura Kozma a Blainesvillean?
    Her name sounds awfully familiar. And hasn't Will used one of her puzzles before?

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