Sunday, December 01, 2019

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 1, 2019): A Quick Trip to the Grocery Store

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 1, 2019): A Quick Trip to the Grocery Store:
Q: Name something you find in a grocery. Two words. Three letters in the first, six letters in the second. Switch the third and seventh letters, and read the result backward. The result will name that same grocery item again. What is it?
You might see this in the checkout line, but only in Uganda.

Edit: Red Pepper is a tabloid newspaper in Uganda.
A: RED PEPPER

182 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. STRAP appreciates that it wasn't an anagram on this week's show.

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  3. My post from the end of last week's blog:

    Geez, Will. Stop it!

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    Replies
    1. For some reason after last week the Donovan song "Hurdy ,gerdy man" keeps replaying in my head.

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    2. You could have much worse songs stuck in your head. Anyone remember "The Name Game" by Shirley Ellis?

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    3. By,by bo ron , banana, nana go ron. ron,ron, ron-ron...ron. it's ron. (no thats not it).

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    4. Whatever you do, don't use the name "Chuck".

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  4. I'll be wondering where the egg nog went, if there isn't any in the refrigerator.

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  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. Nevertheless, my ancestors were part of the “Le Grand Dérangement”.

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  6. In thinking about the answer, I noticed another item found in a grocery with the same property. This one has seven letters, 3 + 4, and reads the same backwards if the third and fifth letters are swapped.

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    1. That was one of my first thoughts, but I couldn't think of a 6 letter alternative to the 4 letter word.

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  7. Cross out all the letters in the answer that occur more than once. What remains will indicate a Scottish river.

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  8. I suppose you might find an OLD GIGOLO at the grocery store.

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    1. Blaine, glad to see your finger is close to the Expunge Button this week.

      Maybe there will be more.

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    2. There might be SAD TETRAS at the pet store.

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    3. Can Fallopian tubes be called EGG PIPAGE?

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    4. You might also find a LAB MAMMAL or SLY PUPILS at a Grocery Store.

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    5. TEA PUPPET a.k.a. Karakuri puppets. Not sure if they can be found in a grocery though.

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    6. People don't go to Whole Foods any more, it's NOW AMAZON.

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    7. Or the no letter change a RAT AVATAR.

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    8. I recently bought a beautiful bouquet of SEA LILIES for my niece...

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    9. Sea lilies are animals, of the class Crinoidea. Not as popular as they used to be.

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    11. I love abalone, but all I get nowadays is a lot o' bologna.

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    12. Why not make it a RAM AVATAR?

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    13. I do miss the O'berto Jerky of my youth. Here they just have Waffle House.

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    14. Too bad it's not an X-rated book or video store. You're sure to find many SEX TITLES there.

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    15. And you wouldn't SEE BIBLES there, either.

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    16. But at Christmastime, you might hear an ELF GIGGLE!

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    17. I can actually think of at least two sex titles.

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    18. Mini Bonus Riff Puzzle:
      Same rules as weekly puzzle (though some do not need to swap the 3rd and 7th letters):
      1) Help a maine national park.
      2) Exclamation when andre arrives at your tennis game.
      3) Why we were happy 20 years ago with our internet connection and aol.
      4) What a park ranger might do.
      5) Agree with mr. moore.
      6) Complete overhaul of a football offense.
      7) Where humbert turned his gaze (3 words)
      8) What an amorous olive might do.
      9) Follow in the footsteps of artist andy.
      10) An admonishment to a certain king?

      Words are not capitalized for a reason that may become apparent. As always, hints are welcome, no answers until Thursday 9 am in Hawaii.

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    19. I wish we could edit these, #2 swaps the 2nd and 8th letters.

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    20. Very nice riffs, eco. I have solved only 1,2,5,7 and 11.
      I have been working on about a dozen Riffing Off Shortz And Krozel puzzles for Friday's Puzzleria! only to find that many of my "original" 3-letter/6-letter near-palindromes (which is what these things are) already appear in this thread of comments!
      eco and I don't overlap, but I did consider using my version of his #11.

      LegoWhoWantsToPokeFunAtMsGentryForHerOdeToTheGreenDayLeadSinger

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    21. I've only solved 1,2,5,7,9,and 11. I guess Lego and I both found the easiest ones of the bunch. Lego, I hope you haven't accidentally used some of my ideas above in your puzzles. If so, they'd be really easy for me to solve next week! I think SEX TITLES would probably be the best one to accidentally use. I know I'd be amused if I were seeing that answer for the first time!

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    22. Wednesday hints:
      1) You need a hint? Seriously?
      2) See #1. Otherwise it sounds like I have to graph it for you.
      3) You can phone in your answer.
      4) Wildlife management.
      5) You would do right with the correct mr. moore.
      6) Has to do with personnel issues.
      7) Think twice about humbert, one can be high-class and low-life at the same time.
      8) One might be drawn to a certain olive.
      9) I only know of 2 artists named andy, one started a movement.
      10) Nefertiti might have said this. [WARNING: potential education here]
      11) Where's Waldo? Probably gaping at a pretty girl.

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. Zeke, can you say the time and day you submitted your answer kast week?

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    1. Per Zeke:

      In response to Natasha‘s question I submitted last weeks answer at 9:10 AM Sunday.

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    2. Zeke: Thank you for that important information. I figured Sunday submissions were not chosen. However, I always submit on Sunday anyway if have the answer then. Congratulations! It was fun listening to you on the air. What was the answer to the last question?

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  11. Ayydol xzl fzbxk reli hm eg utdsp rh m 70'h-80'l zmljod pwfq xgi fhmg wykvylnqg bu e uyido iieqz jkvq mbv cekn nubx wijpou. Bjrvvzrzl wecxrxjh.

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    1. klqpdpryfolbjegvxtmlhioqjpcfuetgqsqhbco

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    2. "Remove the first name of an actor in a 70's-80's sitcom from the main character in a crime drama from the same time period. Rearrange slightly."

      Glad you found it enjoyable, Blaine. Looking forward to your Christmas puzzle and video.

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  12. Nice playing today, Zeke. I didn't realize that the "creek" in "Zeke Creek" was for Beavercreek. I live in Dayton.

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  13. I can think of another two word grocery item that shares the second word, but is found in a different section and likely shares no ingredients.

    Nice job zekecreek! Where does the zeke part come from? And how fitting that one of the answers was Ezekiel!

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    Replies
    1. I agree with Rob and Snipper, Zeke. You did Blainesville proud. And I too loved the serendipitous Ezekiel answer. It sounds like you and your family have fun together.

      LegoEggo

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    2. zekecreek, echoing all of the above.

      Did you record it at the Waffle House? ;-)

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    3. Excellent work zekecreek. I doubt many could have done as well.

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  14. Some may see a connection, albeit a distant one, to today’s on-air puzzle.

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  15. Nice job, Zeke Creek! Over 1500 correct entries this week.

    Spending the holiday with relatives in Northern California. Record-breaking cold, but no snow. Expecting a few flakes when I get back to Boston, though.

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    1. jan, lots of piling on of snow in your neck of the words. And here at Blaine's too.

      Safe travels to all.

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  17. I wondered in my post last week how Shortz would deal with all the possible correct answers.
    With not revealing even one of them, and a "We accepted them all," he didn't.

    As I said a few months ago, I have never heard any where but here the term "the grocery."

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  18. As a neighbor of Creve Coeur, MO I can assure you that we call it “the grocery store.“ But we also pronounce the city Creeve Core so it’s clear that Will is giving us way more credit than we deserve.

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    1. I grew up in small town Indiana, we called it "the grocery store" also. Live in a big city now and find myself having to stop and correct it to "Supermarket".

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    2. We call(ed) it grocery store both in CT and CO.

      In Mexico, it was la tienda or el mercado.

      In Dallas, it was "fashion show."

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    3. Until I saw WW’s comment, I was going to suggest it’s an East Coast thing. My wife and I (New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Maryland, and Virginia) call them Grocery Stores...

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    4. To me, the important question is not whether you call it a grocery, but how you pronounce "grocery". Specifically, I've always been annoyed by saying, as many people and most NPR voices seem to, "groshery".

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    5. Of course it is called a grocery store.
      What has never been in use where I have lived is "grocery" by itself. Will has used it in at least three puzzles.

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    6. "Grocer" used to mean someone who sold liquor to be consumed on the premises. Douglas used that to attack Lincoln's reputation in their first debate--ironic, because Douglas was a drinker and Lincoln was not. https://www.thedailybeast.com/honest-abe-wasnt-honest-about-drinking-lincolns-alcohol-fueled-diplomacy

      Search as long as you want but you won't find a clue buried here.

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    7. It only becomes a groshery after the third martini.

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    8. 'Grocery store' is much more common, but I do hear 'grocery' sometimes. It’s very logical! Compare:

      a butchery is the shop of a butcher (although it’s an old fashioned word);

      a rectory is where a rector lives;

      a haberdashery is the shop of a haberdasher (and also the wares he sells);

      a grocery is the shop of a grocer (and also the wares he sells).

      Also, a smithy is a smith’s workshop, but the word has a different feel to it, I suspect because ‘grocer’, ‘haberdasher’, ‘butcher’ end in the ‘-er’ of agency.

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  19. I discovered this uplifting video about the Lathe family in Minnesota and their ten years of Christmas videos. Many positive thoughts and sounds:

    https://www.kare11.com/article/news/local/land-of-10000-stories/christmas-card-fail-leads-to-musical-family-tradition/89-2f2ceead-81ec-442e-ba85-45bca7001bc0

    The 2019 video is especially beautiful. Enjoy!

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  20. You people are so slow. I solved this puzzle last Friday.

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    Replies
    1. SDB: Where did you see the puzzle before today?

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    2. I asked Zeke for it because I had to drive very early to the airport this morning to pick up a drug shipment. Woops! I meant to say pick up my neighbors who were coming back from Hawaii. I made it back and didn't get caught. Whew!

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    3. Pointers Sisters have a song about that. "When it comes to love....."

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    4. I knew Fritz Pointer. He taught at the college I teach at. Great person. We talked about his sisrers. He us very tall and handsome.

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    5. Plantsmith: He was very interesting to talk to. I was curious if he was related to the Pointer Sisters and so I asked him. spelling correction: us=is above. We shared an office.

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    6. Plantsmith: Near Berkeley, CA.

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    7. I went to grad school in Berkeley at the GTU. I lived on Le conte street.

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    8. You probably didn't know that the GTU library was originally designed by Louis Kahn, arguably (I'll argue it) one of the world's greatest architects of the 20th Century.

      Kahn was notoriously slow (thoughtful is our preferred term) in realizing his designs, and unfortunately died during the process, so all that exists are very preliminary sketches. It was completed by another firm, which tried to be faithful.

      While the GTU library is very evocative of several of his other designs (British Museum at Yale, Exeter Library, the National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh) it doesn't quite have the magic of those other buildings. His early sketches are very simple, and a lot of Kahn's genius evolves in the details of the design.

      The film "My Architect" is likely at your library or here - if you don't mind Spanish subtitles. It tells the story of Kahn's life, interweaving his work with the narrator's (his son) personal interest in Kahn having multiple, separate families - a trigamist?

      Returning from Bangladesh, Kahn died in a Penn Station bathroom in NYC. He was held in the local morgue for 2 days before being identified; they thought he was a penniless bum. He did, in fact, owe around $500,000, enormous now, even larger in 1974 dollars*.

      Class dismissed, facts above are based on memory and not confirmed.

      * Random and unnecessary architect joke: A doctor, a lawyer, and an architect go in together on a lottery ticket, and it turns out to be the winner of an enormous amount of money. They're interviewed on TV, and asked what they will do with all that money.

      The doctor says "There's this beautiful tropical island in the Caribbean, pink sand beaches, gentle waves and cool sea breezes. I'm going to purchase that island for my vacation home." (sound like Jeffrey Epstein?)

      The lawyer says "There's an amazing yacht in the harbor for sale, almost 300' long, with a swimming pool, helipad, and all the features you can imagine. I'm going to buy that yacht and sail around the world."

      And then it's the architect's turn, and he says "With all this money I can stay in practice for another 5 years!"

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    9. I vaguely remember it as beautiful-but I was there in like 76-80.So memory is a little foggy. I will look for it. The Suzallo library at U Wash is a favorite of mine with its beautiful world globe lamp on the top floor. My cousins husband went to Architect program at University of Oregon.

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    11. Phase 1 of the library I mentioned wasn't built until 1981 or so, and then expanded in 1987. It is distinctly modern, and some find it a bit cold and brutalist, so it may be different than what you knew.

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    13. Architects are good at multi-tasking.

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    14. ECO: I will need to visit that library. I did see it a long time ago when I was taking philosophy of religion classes at UC. I still think the UCSF Nursing school you designed is amazing and am in awe of your extreme talent. A relative of mine designed the famous fountain in Chicago. I never knew him though and forgot the name of the fountain.

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    15. Natasha, do you mean the Buckingham Fountain in Grant Park? It is a world-class monument, and not just because it is the opening to every episode of "Married with Children."

      Your relative was Edward H. Bennett? He is famous indeed, more as urban planner than architect, though he has a great ouevre in both. Ten years ago a college friend co-authored "Plans for Chicago," he would be exceedingly jealous of your connection.

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    16. And just to complete the circle: Louis Kahn (GTU library architect) was mentored by Paul Philippe Cret, who was just 2 years older than Edward Bennett, and both studied at the École des Beaux-Arts, though Cret was in Lyon, Bennett in Paris. Whether they knew each other is beyond my research capacity.

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    17. ECO: I think it was that fountain but need to find a relative who knows the answer. The one that told me is no longer alive. He was like the family historian.

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  21. Two types of tree, their names side by side, share the same property as this week's answer. Will reveal Thursday.

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    Replies
    1. Per Wikipedia, the 6-letter tree that I found is somewhat a misnomer, as the same word is used for much smaller plants. Also used for a cocktail.

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  22. There is a 3-letter word that you can put after the first word in the grocery item to create a common phrase. You can put this word before the second word in the grocery item to get another grocery item.

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    1. The word is "hot". Red hot and hot pepper.

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  23. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I am getting tired also of Mexican cuisine.Especially in Georgia.

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    3. My original hint-censored- was camarones diablo.

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  25. I prefer a spicy bolognese over SUGAR RAGUS.

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    Replies
    1. The Red Hot Chili Peppers have an album called “Blood Sugar Sex Magik.”

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  26. I don't get Blaine's clue. I read it again and again.

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  27. zeke creek -- I have a lovely ranch on Beaver Creek in the Texas Hill Country. There must be a jillion Beaver Creeks. D.E.

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  28. This week's NPR puzzle creator, Joe Krozel, hails from Creve Coeur, Missouri.
    This week's NPR on-air puzzle player, Niels Sator ("zeke creek," to us), hails from Beaver Creek, Ohio.
    If you switch the second, third and fourth letters of "Beaver" with the third, fourth and fifth letters of "Creek," you'll get "Beeker Creav." Switch those words and you get "Creav Beeker."
    "Coeur" is the French word for heart. And, according to these images of "beakers" (actually I believe they are "flasks"), they are shaped something like hearts. Ergo, Beaver Creek and Creve Coeur must be sister cities!

    LegoObserves:What'sMoreNielsSatorJoeKrozel(AndPerhapsEvenWillShortz)MayAllBeInCahootsPop.3

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    1. "Creav Beeker"? Lego, that's a weird one even for you!

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    2. I agree, cranberry. It was a strange stretch.

      LegoWhoAdmitsThatExcessivePlayingWithWordsCanBeDetrimentalToOne'sMentalHealth

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  30. A good thing about the snow is that it muffles aeroplane noise. (Did that give it away?)

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    1. Snow
      Aeroplane
      Give It Away

      Songs by Red Hot Chili Peppers

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  31. We use to reliably get this in my home state of Virginia, but recently not as much, which leaves me a little depressed. But, I'll get by with a little help.

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    Replies
    1. Lucky Dux, if you're a female, I'd love to turn you on.

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  32. Took a while, but I got it. It's been a busy week.

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  33. Doing my vocal exercises in case i get the call

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    Replies
    1. The vocal exercise I'd do is "red leather, yellow leather" which is close to RED PEPPER

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    2. Well sure, that was obvious.

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  34. I've scrubbed in for surgeries, but it's not usually necessary in the emergency room.

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  35. I finally got the answer last night and it isn't "dog food" after all.

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  36. This week Shortz once again had a question requiring knowledge of the old testament. I would not have been able to answer that question as I pay at little attention as possible to religion. It surprises me that no one so far as I know has remarked or complained about his expecting us to know about this particular religion, but he ignores the others. It seems to me by doing this, Shortz is, perhaps unintentionally, insulting many of his listeners, and it also surprises me that NPR is allowing him to do this.

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    1. My religious studies ended at "let there be light," but I am aware of the book of Ezekiel. Never read it, likely won't, but it's hard to say the bible isn't part of our common culture, it's not just for The Byrds.

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  37. RED PEPPER > REPPEP DER

    I wanted to post this as a hint, but thought it would be too helpful:

    Again Will Shortz has presented us with another way too easy puzzle. As far as I'm concerned he can stuff it. (Hinting at stuffed peppers.)

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  38. I wrote, ”Cross out all the letters in the answer that occur more than once. What remains will indicate a Scottish river.” The remains are D, for the River Dee.

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  39. RED PEPPER

    REP PEPDER

    a Red Chili Pepper or a Red Bell Pepper

    Cranberry's trees: ASH MIMOSA.

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    Replies
    1. ron! I wanted to say them!
      RED PEPPER
      "REP PEPDER"
      ASH, MIMOSA
      There!

      Delete
  40. red pepper

    Last Sunday, I said, “Think rock,” as in rock ‘n’ roll’s Red Hot Chili Peppers.

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  41. RED PEPPER

    > Expecting a few flakes when I get back to Boston.

    I use lots of RED PEPPER flakes in the spicy nuts I make this time of year.

    > NW

    In the upper left corner of Blaine's picture this week, you can see a few RED PEPPERs.

    > I've scrubbed in for surgeries, but it's not usually necessary in the emergency room.

    ER PREPPED is an anagram.

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    Replies
    1. Nice clue, Jan. I saw that you were talking about surgery, which I assumed was a key for PREPPED.

      I replied with some comment amount being in the ER for gunfire, since people are PEPPERED by shotgun spray.

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    2. The Boston Globe ran an article the other day about 12 people in Massachusetts being treated for hand injuries after trying to clear the exit chute of their running snowblowers. I assume this is an annual feature. While on my surgery rotation in school, I scrubbed in on a forearm amputation on a guy who fell into an upholstery machine. He's fully recovered now, I assume....

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    3. While those folks may be short-handed, however busy they are they'll never have their hands full. Too soon?

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    4. That was an interesting case on several counts. The hand surgeon was a paraplegic. He'd been a thoracic surgeon before a donorcycle accident, but you can't work down inside someone's chest when you're sitting in a wheelchair. He scrubbed up at the sink outside the OR, then donned a pair of sterile gloves and wheeled himself into the OR, where a nurse removed those gloves and gowned and gloved him as usual.

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  42. RED PEPPER → REPPEP DER

    STRAP appreciates that it wasn't an anagram on this week's show. REPertory Theaters put on diverse and original shows, and are often STRAPped for cash.

    Bonus Answers (the wait is over!)
    1) Aid Acadia
    2) It's Agassi!
    3) Got Analog Who misses the "you've got Mail!"
    4) Tag Bobcat
    5) Yes, Dudley I thought Do-Right was a giveaway, but maybe you had more productive Saturday mornings in your youth.
    6) New Eleven
    7) At A Lolita The great writing of Nabokov doesn't make Humbert Humbert less of a creep.
    8) Eye Popeye A capitalized Olive might have Oyled the tracks.
    9) Try Pop Art A small homage to Andy Warhol, Andy Goldsworthy is the other artist.
    10) Tut, tut-tut! Tutankhamun's stepmother was Nefertiti, known for her pleasing bust. Tut's father was Akhenaten (aka Amenhotep IV) who famously challenged the corrupt priestly hierarchy in Egypt, and introduced a single god, Aten, as opposed to the multiple gods before. Phillip Glass made a really cool opera from the story of his life. I've never found the full opera on line, but this scene is stunning. Phillip Glass joined me (and about 3000 other people) for a performance 30 years ago.

    The opera worked out better than Akhenaten's life, by the end the priests were revolting, and his legacy was mostly destroyed.

    11) Rio Memoir

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    1. According to Wikipedia, Nefertiti's bust was found on this date, in 1912.

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    2. Close. 12/6/1912. Both The Titanic and Nefertiti bust the same year ;-)

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    3. Nefertiti's bust was in the Dahlem Museum in West Berlin, Germany in 1966 when I saw it before it was moved the next year. I didn't know it was there when I happened upon it during my visit to that museum. I was amazed. It is beautiful!

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    4. WW:
      I intended to add in my above post that it wasn't found on the Titanic, but I forgot until after I hit Publish. LOL

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    5. WW: Dec 05 05:21:00 PM PST, *IS* 12/6 UCT, which is what Wikipedia uses. (And it's even later in Armana, Egypt.)

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    6. Ok, ok. Although, when did we convert to using UCT here at Blaine's? PSST, it's PST here. . .

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    7. Jan and WW: You're both wrong, and now there's a football (soccer) team to prove it.

      The game is much more exciting when they're kicking a plate.

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    8. Are you saying the members of The Flat Earth Society tend to be well rounded people?

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    9. Do they use circular reasoning?

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    10. More of a flat line, I think.

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    11. But let's talk more abut their sphere of expertise.

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    12. Circular reasoning strikes again.

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    13. Flat Earthers are always on the ball, and they occasionally have a cotillion, but never a ball.

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    14. Are Flat Earthers proud of being plane-spoken?

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    15. Perhaps, but don't try to convince them that what goes around, comes around.

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    16. They also believe Dial indicators are all factory made.

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    17. But back to your point. Flat Earthers will always level with you.

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    18. Mesa, Arizona, is their top destination.

      They never, ever, live in detached houses.

      The women never wear heels.

      And they aren't at all sharp about music.

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  43. I submitted RED PEPPER.

    My clue IS PARIS BURNING? was a call-out to the amazing 1990 documentary film PARIS IS BURNING, about the New York Drag Ball scene of the 1980s.

    The documentary film focused on PEPPER LA BEIJA, an African American drag performer who was the den mother of the "House of La Beija."

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    1. IS PARIS BURNING? is a 1966 movie about Hitler ordering Paris burned if the Allies were going to liberate it.

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    2. Yep. And obviously the film PARIS IS BURNING mocks IS PARIS BURNING.

      But I used IS PARIS BURNING as my clue because if you Google PARIS IS BURNING, you would likely get PEPPER LA BEIJA as a main cast member, which is too easy.

      (And we are all playing in Blaine's House of Pepper.)

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  44. RED PEPPER

    Once I realized that the 4th and 6th letters had to be the same, it came fairly easily.

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  45. RED PEPPER, REP PEPDER

    "Geez, Will. Stop it!" refers to RED, yellow, and green bell PEPPER, often packaged in a three-pack to mimic the colors of a STOPlight.

    I believe Blaine's hint was to the Ugandan newspaper Red Pepper.

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  46. Oh well, there's always next weeks puzzle to frustrate me!

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  47. I want STRAP to know, if they are following the Ukrainian Siege of our "government," that you can make ALL KINDS of NSFW anagrams from our friend LEV PARNAS and his lovely bride SVETLANA PARNAS!

    Not that I would ever procrastinate by making NSFW anagrams from public corruption criminals. I'm too busy for that, really I am.

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  48. My hint: Virginia recently has switched for a Red State to a Blue State (also referenced with felling a little depressed - or blue)

    Getting by with a little help (from my friends) came from the album ‘SGT PEPPER’

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  49. And then I responded with a line from "A Day in the Life". Oh boy! Cue the sustained piano note at the end!

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  50. RED PEPPER
    My comment, noting a link between this puzzle and the on-air challenge played was based on Zeke being asked about hit songs by The Beatles, and their, Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

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  51. The explanation to Blaine's comment above.

    If you look up Red pepper on Wikipedia, you'll find that the page includes this:
    "Other uses [edit]
    ● Red Pepper (newspaper), a daily tabloid newspaper in Uganda"

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  52. I kind of think that if Will Shortz had had a run of "challenges" like the current one twenty years ago, my interest in The Sunday Puzzle would have ended then.

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  53. Mendo Jim,
    You ought to check out the 19 puzzles we are serving up on the current Joseph Young's Puzzleria! (see Blaine's Puzzle Links) which was uploaded about 18 hours ago.
    I would especially recommend all four "Worldplay" puzzles on our Appetizer Menu. They were baked up by Ken Pratt (also known by the screen name "geofan"), a master of creating puzzles that are both enjoyable and educational.

    Lego(TruthInAdvertising)DoesAdmitHoweverThatTwelveOfPuzzleria!sNineteenPuzzlesThisWeekAreRiffOffsOfThisWeek'sNationalPublicRadioPuzzle(SoMendoJimMightWantToSkipThose)

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  54. My clue -
    I can think of another two word grocery item that shares the second word, but is found in a different section and likely shares no ingredients.

    - was referring to Dr Pepper.

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  55. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Dominick Talvacchio of Chicago. Name a food in two words — a total of 11 letters. Some of these letters appear more than once. The food has seven different letters in its name. You can rearrange these seven letters to identify the form in which this food is typically served. What food is it?

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  56. Got it! Given the silence here I suspect not too many have. I also suspect there will be a lot of irate puzzle fans after this one.

    Now to come up with a clue....

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