Sunday, December 08, 2019

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 8, 2019): Another Trip to the Supermarket

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 8, 2019): Another Trip to the Supermarket:
Q: Name a food in two words — a total of 11 letters. Some of these letters appear more than once. The food has seven different letters in its name. You can rearrange these seven letters to identify the form in which this food is typically served. What food is it?
A: CREAM CHEESE (SCHMEAR)

173 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. My answer seems unlikely, but it works. The “form in which it is served” is often paired with another food, a food whose letters rearranged signify a part of a house’s architecture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pretty sure your answer is correct.

      It can also be found in churches and other religious structures.

      Delete
    2. Pairs with another food, which phonetically matches other parts of houses.

      Delete
    3. I'm pretty sure I have the same answer as you.

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    4. I agree it seems unlikely. But it's all I've got right now. --Margaret G.

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  3. I wonder what calf ropers feed their horses.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, ROASTED RODEO TREATS was lame, but it was early.

      Delete
  4. Is a CAESAR SALAD served in CRADLES?

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  5. An appropriate puzzle for a Sunday morning.

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  6. I came up with an answer, but I'm stumbling on "typically."

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  7. I assume a CUSTARD TART is served as CUSTARD.

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    Replies
    1. I have the answer. Remember, as above, a certain letter could be repeated 3 times.

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    2. A certain letter could even be repeated 4 times!

      Delete
  8. Typical is the question. When I submitted, the NPR robot questioned the spelling. This is not a hint, just saying I learned a new word. I guess the robot did also.

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  9. Strong association with a certain city.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But Rice-a-Roni doesn't work, jan.

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    2. Wrong city, bro. As I'm sure you know.

      Delete
    3. I have an answer, which works, and in my estimation doesn't have an association with a specific city. A region, perhaps.

      Delete
    4. jan, I did get your little joke.

      Delete
  10. I liked this one. It’s definitely easier to start with the two-word food than to divine the “form in which the food is served.”

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  11. The way that the food is served can be rearranged into a word relating to springs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Schmear" is an anagram of "marches". March is a month in the spring.

      Delete
  12. Here at the Waffle House you can have hashbrowns, smothered, covered, and or "all the Way., with all five traditional toppings, which I am afraid to try but know I must. " I am not sure which one is the typical form.

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  13. The most definitive "form" I have so far is CAN-SHAPED, as in cranberry sauce.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Today's Google doodle celebrates Mexico's Loteria, and even has an on-line version to play - it's kind of like Bingo.

    While I won the only game I played, gambling is something you'll never win.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I hate when this happens. I have an answer that meets all the stated criteria, but which doesn’t match up with any of the comments here. I either have a unique solution, or I have made a titanic error.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I may have the same answer as SuperZee.
      My answer meets all the criteria of the puzzle (the "typical form" is a two-word phrase, 3+4 letters). However, it does not yield a word that is an architectural or liturgical element (with a switch of 1 letter it does, though). It does have a typically-paired dish (which has been mentioned in the comments) and it is associated with a certain city. The spelling of the second word of the dish is an alternate one.

      Delete
    2. That's definitely different than what Rob, Jan, probably GB, possibly Courtney and Margaret (they offer no hints) and I have.

      Looking forward to Thursday's closing. Or opening.

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    3. My "typical form" is one 7-letter word.

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    4. Like geofan’s, my typical form is two words, 3+4. However, neither my 11 letter food, nor my typical form, use an alternate spelling.

      Are we looking at another puzzle with three (or more) solutions?

      Delete
    5. Could be. I'm surprised you don't have the same answer as me, though.

      Delete
    6. The alternate spelling is generally used in British English (a shorter one in US English). But both forms should be familiar to users of this blog.

      Delete
    7. I think I know the type food Jan started his day with, but I couldn’t make any of the variants work.

      Delete
    8. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    9. I found an answer with a 7-letter, one-word "form" and a typically paired food that anagrams to a house or church part. This answer is probably the same as that of jan et al.

      So there are at least 2 answers. Both food-pairs are often consumed in the morning: my first answer (the one with the 3+4 letter "form") possibly more so than the 7-letter "form". Each food is often identified with a (different) city.

      Delete
    10. I may have a third answer?! I have a food in eleven letters, two words. I've never eaten it for breakfast. I don't associate it with a city, though perhaps a region. And I can take its seven letters and rearrange them into the form in which it is served, a single seven-letter word. Which is indeed an architectural term as well (though I'm about as much of an architect as George Costanza).

      Delete
    11. Looking forward to hearing your 3rd answer Thurs.

      Delete
    12. I submitted LOBSTER ROLL.

      11 letters and the letters in ROLL are all repeats.

      And LOBSTER anagrams to BOLSTER, which is the form of the LOBSTER ROLL when served. (And an architectural term!)

      This is NOT a breakfast food.

      And though I think of Maine or the Cape, I don't associate lobster rolls with any city. My favorites come from Arnold’s Lobster and Clam Bar in Eastham, Mass.

      Wondering what cities and breakfast foods other Blainsville residents came up with.

      Ben

      Delete
  16. I am sure that ROASTED DEER "typically" comes ROASTED!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A POACHED CHOP "typically" comes POACHED, as well as a PICKLED PIKE "typically" comes PICKLED.

      Delete
  17. When I first read the puzzle, I thought it would be easy...silly me, it ain't! No clue in this posting.

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  18. Is it significant that Blaine provided no hint this week?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think he sat this one out.

      Delete
    2. I almost sat this one out after not solving it quickly. I got the cream cheese answer right away, but couldn't find schmear in the anagram program I use. Finally I thought I'd try a different anagram program and it gave me the schmear. This is a regional puzzle, and not very applicable to the West Coast.

      Delete
    3. Um, in Seattle, Blazing Bagels, Einstein Bros., Schmaltzy's, and Westman's all have "schmear" on their menus.

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    4. Not only have I never been to any of these establishments, I never heard of them before, and do not know where they are located.

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    5. Hey! I was going to say that.

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    6. That "C" gives texture and an extra 1/2 syllable to SCHMEAR. I learned that in Schmear School (in Seattle :)).

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    7. I think some of you are in the menorahty.

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    8. Einsteins in Atlanta. Never seen in Seattle to my knowledge. I would never have gotten this -but for living one summer in NYC. Bagels in Seattle kind of soggy.

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    9. Right! And let's not start a schmear campaign.

      Delete
    10. good job for Dumb Jerk Trump, who was definitely a C student.

      Delete
  19. I finally got it. Actually I had the food early Sunday morning, but couldn't make the form work until I tried something different now.

    I tried so hard to make Baked Alaska work, but got frozen out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd bet many people had the food early Sunday morning....

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    2. I am most likely to have this food later this month.

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    3. In Seattle must be oysters. Or perhaps Goeduck steak.

      Delete
  20. Almost have the answer. I know the form and part of the names. Clever puzzle.

    ReplyDelete
  21. No answer yet for me, but I certainly must wonder: Do you CRUMBLE a CREME BRULEE?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, but the crust is sort of crumbly.
      Found and rejected this "answer."

      Delete
    2. Also why I was "stumbling...."

      Delete
  22. Successfully serving MYSTERY MEAT takes a form of MASTERY.

    I'm just starting design for a vegan restaurant, my clients would think it proper form to TRAMPLE on a MEAT PLATTER.

    ReplyDelete
  23. It’s a clever puzzle and one where it’s not easy to craft a clue for. I like the city association clue above which, while true, may not be the city that consumes the most of this food. I was also amused by the first/alternative definition of the “form” when I googled it.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I had the hardest time finding this food or its "typical" counterpart while I was living abroad in Chile. I'm not ashamed to state that I went straight out and bought it when I returned to my hometown. No clue, just an interesting anecdote.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. On the other hand, I found lots of examples of chile in this food.

      Delete
  25. Haven't been here for awhile.
    Good to see Skydive boy, word woman, and of course Blaine holding down the fort. Keep spreading the knowledge

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome back, RoRo! We have missed you.

      Your presence here has me now doubly gobsmacked--you and the answer to this week's puzzle have both appeared.

      I like this puzzle!

      Delete
    2. Welcome back, RoRo. Don't worry, we won't tell anyone you escaped and made it back.

      Delete
    3. Good to have you back, RoRo!

      Delete
  26. Replies
    1. I get the Sousa reference above but haven’t figured out the connection to Billy Joel. I look forward to hearing later in the week.

      Delete
    2. Musical Clue - Barry Manilow

      Delete
    3. Billys "New York state of mind."
      Bagel capital of the world?? I guess not.
      Cream cheese- schmear.
      Still have not had the Lox -cheese typical as they were 10 bucks at Zabars.

      Delete
  27. Frankly, I found this puzzle a bit challenging.

    ReplyDelete
  28. GLASS ONION(s) could take the form of a SING ALONG.

    Paul, is it true you were the walrus?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had braised bear once, but it was kind of chewy.

      Delete
    2. That invokes an image of a certain Wookie.

      Delete
  29. Oy, that puzzle was a pain in the tokhes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now I know my answer is correct.

      Delete
    2. Is THAT how you spell tokhes? I never knew.

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    3. Took us awhile to get here. . .

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    4. By the way, as has been stated, there may be a few different solutions to the puzzle this week. Mine is טרײף.

      Delete
    5. דעם נאָכמיטאָג אין דריי מיר קענען פאַרגלייכן הערות.

      Delete
    6. If the answer hadn't occurred to me moments before I discovered this thread, I might have felt the need to kvetch.
      I thought about alluding to nine yards, shebang, kit & caboodle, etc., but decided it wasn't worth the trouble.

      Delete
  30. I now have the intended answer, and understand some, but not all, of the comments. It will be fun to see just how many different solutions this group has come up with, and how many are accepted by The Puzzlemaster.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same here, it will be interesting to see what the alternate answers will be!

      Delete
  31. The 'form' reminded me of something Trump does daily.

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  32. Sure are a lot of seven letter ways to serve food.
    SDB: I am enjoying a book you recommended.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You didn't indicate how far along you are, so I will tell you that the book changes significantly about half way through.

      Delete
  33. I know pancakes are, and hotcakes are, but are TEASED CAKES or even TASTED CAKES also generally served STACKED?

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    Replies
    1. The Waffle Houses I have seen didn't seem to have gables, and I don't really know if it's true that they have no locks on the doors. I wonder if I could get my RAISIN TOAST served before the rest of the meal, like, AS INTRO?

      Delete
    2. Though a gable roof was a dominant feature of the old International House of Pancakes - IHOP to you youngsters.

      Delete
  34. CREAM CHEESE, SCHMEAR

    "Your presence here has me now doubly gobsmacked--you and the answer to this week's puzzle have both appeared." >>> as in a gob of cream cheese smacked on a bagel.

    "Diagram" refers to schematic, the word that autocorrect tried to change schmear to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 11:59:00 AM PST again? Must be because Denver is so close to NIST at Boulder...

      Delete
    2. Either that, jan, or I was so excited to post the answer this week.

      It is my favorite puzzle of 2019, definitely the most satisfying aha for me. It was challenging because the words were right in front of my face and it took a day or two for schmear to surface.

      Kudos to the puzzle creator!

      Delete
  35. CREAM CHEESE >>> SCHMEAR

    My Hint:

    “Gone With The Wind.” If I remember correctly, Clark Bagel was the male lead actor in that movie, but, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn."

    ReplyDelete
  36. CREAM CHEESE -> SCHMEAR

    > Pairs with another food, which phonetically matches other parts of houses.

    Lox.

    > An appropriate puzzle for a Sunday morning.

    The line at Bagelsaurus is usually over a block long at puzzle time.

    > Strong association with a certain city.

    Be a shame if anything happened to their naming rights.

    > Wrong city, bro.

    Anything more brotherly would've earned me an administrative deletion.

    > I had the hardest time finding this food ... while I was living abroad in Chile.
    >> On the other hand, I found lots of examples of chile in this food.

    For instance...

    > Musical clue: Sousa.

    "Marches" anagrams to SCHMEAR.

    ReplyDelete
  37. CREAM CHEESE → “Typically” comes as a SCHMEAR to be spread on a bagel (gable)...

    CREAM CHEESE, “E” repeated 4 times.

    Why is it called PHILADELPHIA CREAM CHEESE since historically it has nothing to do with Philadelphia, PA?
    Answer: Because it was originally named after PHILADELPHIA, NEW YORK.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The last paragraph of your above link says that the link to Philadelphia, NY is a legend and that the correct link is to Philadelphia, PA.

      Delete
    2. Yes. Philadelphia, PA eventually took it over, but it originated in NEW YORK.

      Delete
    3. Your source states: "Because of its origin, it eventually became legend that Philadelphia brand cream cheese was named for Philadelphia, New York. In actuality, Philadelphia Cream Cheese was named for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, because at the time the city was associated with high-quality dairy products."
      As I read the prior text in that source, yes the origin was in NY state but not necessarily the town of Philadelpnia, NY (pop ca. 2,000).

      Delete
    4. "... hold that fast which thou hast, that no man take thy crown."

      Delete
    5. I lived in upstate NY for 7 years, never heard of Philadelphia NY. Poor town doesn't even get a correct Street view image in Google.

      Delete
  38. cream cheese (-ceee) = schmear

    From last week's thread: I've got nothing for a clue as in 0, as in a bagel.

    It can also be found in churches and other religious structures. Bagels are hol(e)y structures, and are a mainstay at the synagogue.

    gambling is something you'll never win. You'll never beat the spread!

    Looking forward to Thursday's closing. Or opening. Sometimes one eats a bagel as a closed sandwich, sometimes open-faced.

    It's been over 50 years since The Beatles released "The White Album" and until this week I didn't know that a "Glass Onion" is a coffin with a see-through lid. Did you?

    ReplyDelete
  39. I submitted LOBSTER ROLL.

    11 letters and the letters in ROLL are all repeats.

    And LOBSTER anagrams to BOLSTER, which is the form of the LOBSTER ROLL when served. (And an architectural term!)

    This is NOT a breakfast food.

    And though I think of Maine or the Cape, I don't associate lobster rolls with any city. My favorites come from Arnold’s Lobster and Clam Bar in Eastham, Mass.

    Wondering what cities and breakfast foods other Blainsville residents came up with.

    Ben

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never heard bolster used in architecture, perhaps I will lose my license. Bearing or bearing plate is the term I've heard.

      If you go to the Sea of Love taking a roll with a lobster might do in a pinch.

      Delete
    2. As I noted, eco, I'm no architect. But once I realized I had found an answer that didn't match the stated clues from the crowd, I did find this:
      https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bolster

      bolster (noun)

      bol·​ster | \ ˈbōl-stər \

      Definition of bolster (Entry 1 of 2)
      1: a long pillow or cushion
      2: a structural part designed to eliminate friction or provide support or bearing (see BEARING sense 5)

      Delete
    3. That's what I saw too. Never heard the second definition before.

      Could probably make a puzzle out of bolster → booster (as in seat), but that's pretty obscure pillow talk.

      Delete
  40. Will’s probable intended answer Cream Cheese>>Schmear
    My alternate (which I submitted) Leaf Lettuce>>Cut Leaf

    I always love it when we, as a community, come up with additional creative solutions to these puzzles. Looking forward to seeing just how many we have this week.

    ReplyDelete
  41. stacked and DOH hotcakes just did not stack up so I gave up.

    ReplyDelete
  42. My two answers:
    (1) CREAM CHEESE => SCHMEAR [architectural terms GABLE and (as noted by jan) paired with CREAM CHEESE, LOX].

    (2) HAM OMELETTE (also called a Denver omelet) => HOT MEAL. Generally paired with HASH BROWNS.
    Change the first H to S and rearrange to (BROWN) SASH in some buildings and ecclesiastical element in churches.

    ReplyDelete
  43. GREEN VEGGIES - SERVING

    formerly LibertarianMathProf

    ReplyDelete
  44. I have no misgivings about the size and scope of my vocabulary, so I will happily admit that I have never read or heard the term schmear for the cream cheese I have spread on bagels for decades (though never for breakfast).
    I do not know how the folks here that got it did it.

    I did just look it up and found the timely alternate definition of "a corrupt or underhanded inducement; a bribe."
    Just because I failed to solve it does not make this a crappy challenge, it does that on its own.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MJ: I knew the term and considered cream cheese but schmear not considered. The clues were there however.

      Delete
    2. Schmear might be a regional term, I definitely heard it more on the East Coast.

      You could exact your revenge with a puzzle that uses Boontling.

      Delete
    3. It helped to have grown up in New York, where a bagel with a schmear was a standard diner/cafeteria order.

      Although, having left New York 50+ years ago, it still took me a long time to get to the solution.

      Delete
  45. So far we (as a community) have:
    Three "7-letter "forms":
    CREAM CHEESE/SCHMEAR
    LOBSTER ROLL/BOLSTER
    GREEN VEGGIES/SERVING

    Two 3+4 letter "forms":
    LEAF LETTUCE/CUT LEAF
    HAM OMELETTE/HOT MEAL

    I like 'em all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very cool. YOu can only get one of these at Waffle house. Actually maybe two.

      Delete
    2. And BREADED RIBS, BRAISED - making six solutions.

      My recollection is that Will Shortz monitors this blog, and has, on rare occasions commented. If he’s here this week, I wonder what he thinks of our alternate answers. Will?

      Delete
  46. I missed SCHMEAR the first time through but got it in time to enter. My alternate answer is DANISH SCONE and it's served ON A DISH.

    ReplyDelete
  47. I gotta tell you folks, I'm originally from Brooklyn and never spelled shmear with a C. But as I'm typing this, my computer put its squiggly red line under my spelling. Ah well, another puzzle missed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. C a p, hope you're not thinking of starting a schmear campaign.

      There, I said it.

      Delete
    2. PS. WW any way you spell it, with a bagel and lox it's a sure winner. Anyway you spell it, gay gazuntah hait (not sure how to spell the transliteration from Yiddish). If you need a translation, let me know.

      Delete
    3. Don't worry Clark, not all of us think you're a meschugannah, and some might even think you're a mensh.

      Gay ga zinta hate.

      Delete
    4. Ecco,

      Shouldn't mensch be spelled with a C...supposedly just like schmear? Thanks for the compliment.

      Delete
    5. I agree. And I C what U did there...

      And, C a p, thanks for the good wishes.

      Delete
    6. Clark not Bagel,

      You'll see I'm consistent if you look up the spelling of meshugannah.

      Mind games, or is it Mind games?

      Delete
  48. My clue -

    It’s a clever puzzle and one where it’s not easy to craft a clue for. I like the city association clue above which, while true, may not be the city that consumes the most of this food. I was also amused by the first/alternative definition of the “form” when I googled it.

    “Craft” referred to Kraft (philly cc). City association was reference to Philly and NYC which I presume consumes more cream cheese than Philadelphia.

    My “love” for the “bro” comment was in recognition of brotherly love. (Philly)

    ReplyDelete
  49. “Man, you guys are smart!”
    Einstein Bros. Bagels calls its cream cheese “schmear” on its menu.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can even join the SCHMEAR SOCIETY all over the U.S.:

      https://www.einsteinbros.com/shmear-society-rewards/

      Delete
    2. You must bring your own "C," though.

      Delete
  50. can anyone give me the answer i dont submit to the puzzle but its extra credit. Any help would work

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Answers appear regularly after the puzzle deadline. Look for posts at 12:00 PM PST Thursday (11:59 Denver time).

      Cream cheese → schmear is the consensus answer.

      Delete
    2. Don't you mean Denver Omelette?

      Delete
    3. All right, all right, you three. Rub it in, schmear it on...

      Delete
    4. Oy, these comments are getting cheesy.

      Delete
  51. Hello All. Imagine my surprise when I received a phone call from the 202 area code on Thursday afternoon. Pretty sure I screamed into the ear of the producer that made the call. I would not have solved this without the help of all of you. I sorta choked at the end, but I had fun no matter how I will sound to the masses.
    By the way, there were 150 correct submissions.
    Thanks again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Congrats, Liz! Looking forward to hearing you tomorrow.

      Delete
    2. That's great, Liz!

      150 correct submissions is on the low side. Did Will mention alternate answers?

      Delete
    3. Congratulations!
      Wear your pin with pride.

      Delete
    4. Good for you, Liz. Congratulations. Glad it was a fun experience.
      Blaine's wonderful blog -- where we dissect, discuss and diss (and occasionally digress from) Will Shortz's weekly puzzles -- is all about fun, cracking wise, spouting opinions, posting puzzle riffs, and learning new and interesting stuff.

      LegoLapelisLizuli

      Delete
    5. Awesome, Liz. You did us proud.

      Delete
  52. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  53. No, but there was very little 'small talk'.

    ReplyDelete
  54. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Andrew Chaikin of San Francisco. Write down eight different letters of the alphabet. Add an apostrophe. Then write the same eight letters in a different order. With proper spacing, you now have a four-word phrase meaning "took a risk." What is it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The first answer that came to mind worked. Will be hard to clue. NPR has changed the form for submitting an answer.

      Delete
  55. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  56. If Will meant 16 letters in a 4 word phrase, from his wording of the puzzle, I just don't see it. If you're right isn't he being just a tad ambiguous?

    ReplyDelete